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Nathaniel Russel Middleton Papers, 1823-1881

Nathaniel Russel Middleton’s writings consist of poems, essays, and addresses about Christianity, the fine arts, philosophical materialism, temperance, secession, fame, the U.S. Constitution, and other subjects, many of which were probably delivered to the students of the College of Charleston during his tenure there as professor and president.

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John C. Calhoun Letters, 1824-1850

In this collection are 23 letters written by John Caldwell Calhoun between the years 1824 and 1850. The majority of these letters were written during Calhoun’s second term as South Carolina’s U.S. Senator.  Calhoun divulges his political concerns with confidant Henry Workman Conner, who at the time was the president of the Bank of Charleston, […]

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Alexander Glennie Journal, 1831-1859

Journal kept by Alexander Glennie concerning his activities as rector of All Saints (Episcopal) Church, Waccamaw, South Carolina. Includes a list of plantation chapels (Woodbourne, Laurel Hill, Brookgreen, Oaks, Litchfield, Waverly, Midway, True Blue, Hagley, Fairfield, Sandy Knoll, Cedar Grove, and Mount Arena); the constitution (1832) and minutes (1832-1838) of All Saints Sunday School (an […]

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Gertrude Sanford Legendre Papers, 1836-2000

Gertrude Sanford Legendre (1902–2000) was an American socialite who served as an OSS operative during World War II. She was also a noted explorer, big-game hunter, environmentalist, and owner of Medway plantation in South Carolina. The collection includes scrapbooks of Gertrude’s travels and family life, loose photographs ranging in date from the mid to late […]

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Esau Jenkins Papers, 1963-2003

Esau Jenkins (1910-1972) was born and raised on Johns Island, South Carolina. With very little formal education, he became a businessman and civil rights leader. Jenkins founded the Progressive Club in 1948, which encouraged local African Americans to register to vote, through the aid of Citizenship Schools, a topic he was educated in by his […]

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Philip Simmons Collection

Philip Simmons (1912-2009) was an African American blacksmith and artisan specializing in the craft of ironwork in Charleston, South Carolina. Simmons spent seventy-seven years crafting utilitarian and ornamental ironwork. His work is recognized within the state of South Carolina, nationally, and internationally.  This collection, donated by the Philip Simmons Foundation, holds personal papers with photographs […]

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Newton Plantation Collection

This collection details the inner workings of Newton Plantation in the 1800s and contains several account and transaction ledgers. Specifically, this collection includes several day books (including the Newton Day Book or the Newton Plantation Day Book) originating between 1854-1872. These books provide records of monetary transactions on the plantation, including accounts payable and accounts […]

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South Carolinians at Work

The South Carolina Historical Society’s South Carolinians at Work collection is comprised of correspondence and other records, constitutions, and by-laws of organizations in Charleston, South Carolina. The organizations include Charleston Iron Works, American Federation of Musicians Local 502, Mechanics’ Union No. 1, Charleston Fire Department, and the Bricklayers, Masons and Plasterers International Union of America. […]

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Isaiah Bennett Papers, ca. 1932-2002

Isaiah Bennett (1926-2002) served as a union representative for tobacco workers at the American Tobacco Company’s “Cigar Factory” and as a leader and negotiator of the Charleston Hospital Workers’ Strike of 1969. Bennett also founded and was president of the Charleston chapter of the A. Phillip Randolph Institute, an umbrella organization for black trade unions. […]

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The Fundamental Constitutions of Carolina, 1669

One of a number of versions, the 1669 Fundamental Constitutions was a theoretical instrument of rule. These documents, attributed to the young philosopher John Locke, provided for a feudal system in the new colony, with colonial nobility carrying hereditary titles such as “cacique” and “landgrave,” and the eight proprietors forming the highest level of rule.  […]