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Roswell T. Logan Journal, 1852-1865

Roswell T. Logan Journal, 1852-1865

Roswell T. Logan's Journal, 1852-1865, begins in 1852 with an address before his Charleston High School debate club, the Philomathic Society. Among the many speeches, poems and essays included in the journal are three essays published in the Charleston College Magazine: "Mohammed and His religion" and "College life" in the April 1855 issue and "Goodbye" in May 1855. Poems include a requiem to Logan's old horse John Randolph and a commentary on the contentious election of 1860 titled "The Presidential canvas of 1860." In his last dated entry, July 11th, 1865, Logan says goodbye to his beloved journal with the poem "Farewell to this Book."

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Journal of Charles Cotesworth Pinckney's plantations, 1818-1819

Journal of Charles Cotesworth Pinckney's plantations, 1818-1819

The Charles Cotesworth Pinckney Journal (1818 April 6-May 16, with a few scattered entries in late 1818 and early 1819) consists of journal entries on pages interleaved in Hoff's Agricultural Almanac (1818). The journal records daily activities on Pinckney's plantation. Pinckney not only planted cotton, sweet potatoes, Irish potatoes, corn, and oats, but relied heavily on fish for food. Several pages of the journal contain a list of slaves at "The Crescent," "the old Place," "the Point," and Pinckney Island.

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John F. Riley Papers, 1849-1855

John F. Riley Papers, 1849-1855

Collection consists of papers, including a handwritten "Journal" [diary], exercises, and lecture notes written by physician, J.F.R. The diary commences at New Orleans, Louisiana and includes entries about classes, students, and faculty at the medical department of the University of Louisiana. In May 1853 the author became the medical officer on the steamer Falcon and traveled to Panama, New Granada, Havana (includes descriptions of the houses and customs), and New York (with a stop in Charleston, S.C.). In New York he appeared before the Board of Medical Examiners to obtain a permit, then went to Philadelphia for two months until he obtained his results. After obtaining his permit the author proceeded to Washington, then was ordered to report to New Orleans and was assigned (March 1854) to the military asylum at East Pascagoula, Mississippi. When this branch was broken up in 1855 and the inmates were transferred to Harrodsburg, Kentucky, the author was briefly put in charge of the remaining men. Entries for October 1855 describe the author's passage on the Ben Franklin (ship) from New Orleans to Louisville, and the people he encounters.

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Vincent P. Lannie Collection, 1733-1974

Vincent P. Lannie Collection, 1733-1974

The Vincent P. Lannie Collection consists of five separate manuscripts by plantation owner Elizabeth Allston Pringle: (1) Partial draft of a chapter ("Baby Woes") from "Chronicles of Chicora Wood." (2) A story entitled "The Innocents at Home and the Furniture Fiend Abroad" written under her pen name, Patience Pennington, and intended to be the first in a series of "Peaceville Happenings." (3) A story entitled "My Dogs" for a projected series of "Plantation Sketches." (4) An incomplete rough draft of an untitled short story about Pompey Green and his disobedient wife Doll. (5) Miscellaneous notes on owners of plantations on the Pee Dee, Waccamaw and Black Rivers, with the fullest notes on White House Plantation.

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Small-Whaley Family Papers, 1796-1994

Small-Whaley Family Papers, 1796-1994

The Diary of a Voyage to China, 1850-1851, the private diary of Captain Thomas Small, reveals the intense loneliness of command and details the longing he feels for the wife and newborn son he left behind. He comments on marriage, child-rearing, and religion, and frequently expresses his desire to find employment "ashore" to better provide for his family. In addition to these personal entries, he provides rich details of a mid-nineteenth century life at sea. Daily nautical annotations are augmented with comments about the crew, rations, frequent communications with passing ships, and his waning hope in obtaining a profitable cargo of tea in China.

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Charles Fraser Book of Precedents, 1800-1819

Charles Fraser Book of Precedents, 1800-1819

Charles Fraser's Book of Precedents, 1800-1819, was apparently handwritten by Charleston miniaturist Fraser as a reference work for his legal studies. Compiled mostly from 1800 -1807, the book contains copies of writs, pleas and judgments and includes cases adjudicated from 1736-1819, almost all of which were heard in Charleston district courts.

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Thomas J. Tobias Papers, ca. 1790-1970

Thomas J. Tobias Papers, ca. 1790-1970

The Thomas J. Tobias Papers contain six diaries written by three members of the same family, in the mid-19th century. The Joseph Lyons diary (1833-1834), written when he was between the ages of 19-21, contains Lyons' ruminations on his future career, his beliefs on state's rights, some poetry, and his thoughts on his Jewish faith. Joseph Lyons' nephew, David Henry Mordecai, wrote in four diaries between 1849 and 1858, detailing his travels to Cuba and the Florida Keys, in addition to extensive travels through Europe, and his treatment for tuberculosis. After David Henry Mordecai's death from tuberculosis in 1859, his sister Hortensia journalized her travels in Europe with her family and her diary records her thoughts on art and other sightseeing in Italy, Germany, and France.

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Goldberg Family Papers, 1902-1953

Translation: Here is buried, Pictures of Moshe Yidel Gelbart

Two memorial photograph albums documenting the funeral of Moshe Yidel Gelbart. Gelbart died of appendicitis on February 25, 1935, in Mogielnica, Poland. The albums, made of fabric and paper, contain black and white photographs that chronicle Gelbart's funeral procession, his casket, mourners, and gravesite, including an image of Gelbart with his wife and son eight days before his death. The cover of each book pictures a broken candle and a broken tree, symbolic of a life cut short. Each page includes decorative labels in Hebrew that describe the photographs. The albums were sent to his two brothers, George Goldberg and Israel Geldbart, in South Carolina.

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Miriam DeCosta Seabrook and Herbert U. Seabrook Papers, 1882-1995

Miriam Decosta

This collection includes correspondence, certificates, photographs, and other materials related to Miriam DeCosta Seabrook's education at Avery Institute and elsewhere, teaching career, and civic involvement; correspondence, speeches, and reports related to Dr. Herbert Seabrook, Sr.'s community and fraternal affiliations and to his medical career as a private practitioner and director of the Hospital and Training School for Nurses; and correspondence, memorabilia, and financial documents related to the marriage of Miriam and Herbert Seabrook. The collection also contains correspondence, photographs, and other materials related to their son, Dr. Herbert Seabrook, Jr.  Amerintha Alston Seabrook, Kenneth Seabrook, and other Seabrook family members are also represented. The collection also contains scrapbooks and photographs of Miriam DeCosta Seabrook's relatives, the DeCosta family of Charleston, South Carolina.

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William Henry Johnson Scrapbook

Black and white image of the exterior of Palmer's plantation

This scrapbook by William Henry Johnson is part of a collection three, which document the history of a large array of Lowcountry plantations and places of interest. In this book - compiled, 1928-1932 - Johnson focuses on the Cooper River region and in the Parishes of St Stephen, St James Goose Creek, St James Santee and St. John Berkeley. The scrapbook draws together published historical research, maps, contemporary anecdotes and includes photographs Johnson took while visiting each location.

Subjects covered in this scrapbook include locations in Berkeley County, St. Johns (Berkeley) Parish, Goose Creek, and along the Cooper River. Other sites and subjects include Belmont, Black Oak Church, Bluford, Casada, Cedar Grove, Cedar Spring, Comingtee, a Prioleau family burial ground, Crowfield, Dean Hall Plantation, Dockon Plantation, Eutaw, Eutaw Springs, Exeter, Fairspring, Fort Dorchester, Four Hole Swamp, Gippy, Gravel Hill, the gravestone of Susan Bee, Hanover Plantation, Indian Fields Campground, Ingleside, Indianfield, Liberty Hall Club, Lewisfield, Magnolia Cemetery, monument of Col. Hezekiah Maham, grave of Major Majoribanks, Medway Plantation, Mepkin, a milestone by the Cooper River, Moorfield, Mount Pleasant Plantation, Mulberry Castle, North Hampton, Numertia, The Oaks Plantation, Ophir, Otranto Hunting Club, Parnassus, Pimlico, Pinegrove, Pond Bluff, Pooshee Plantation, John Poppenheim's plantation, Quarter house, Red Bank Hunting Club, an Episcopal church in Pineville, Rice Hope Plantation, The Rocks, St. James Goose Creek church, St. Johns Berkeley rectory site, St. Johns AME Church, a St. Julien family house, a Santee Canal lock, "Sarrazin house," a shanty, Somerset Plantation, Somerton Plantation, "Francis Marion spring," Springfield, Stoney Landing, Strawberry Chapel, Ten Mile Hill, Thoroughgood, Wadboo Barony, Wadboo bridge, Walnut Grove, Walworth, Wampee, Wampoolah, Wappetaw, Washington Plantation, the Whaley place, White Hall, Wiskinboo, Woodlawn, and Yeamans Hall.

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