Pine Forest Inn: Winter Resort (1909)

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    . . The . . Pine Forest Inn Winter Resort Summerville, S.C. 1909 D.P. Co.
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    . . The . . Pine Forest Inn Winter Resort Summerville, S.C. 1909 D.P. Co.
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    THE PINE FOREST INN, SUMMERVILLE, S. C
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    The traveller to reach Summerville can board a parlor vestibule train in New York with its buffet and all its modern luxuries and in twenty-four hours dine at the Pine Forest Inn. The climate of Summerville being so equable, the absence of conditions of dampness or extreme dryness, renders it so remarkably exempt from epidemic and endemic diseases. The hydrometer registers none of the humidity of Florida, the thermometer none of the variable temperature caused by chilling blasts and keen winds, as at places farther north. The atmosphere is stimulating and yet unparalled in its soothing effect upon the nerves, consequently nervous prostration is unknown; the sweet repose is conducive to equanimity of spirit and thorough recuperation. If you are an invalid let me prescribe a visit to the Pine Forest Inn, if you are a tourist, let me assure you, that there are few places in America of so charming.a climate, of such interesting surroundings, so worthy a visit. SOME FACTS WHICH PROVE SUMMERVILLE, S. C, THE MOST DESIRABLE HEALTH RESORT IN THE UNITED STATES. CLIMATOLOGY. Conditions of climate forms one of the first considerations in a place that sets up a claim as a resort for tourists. The advantages of Summerville in this respect have long been recognized: years and years ago, it attained a widespread local reputation for healthfulness. Early in the present century the Pine Ridge, which stretches across from the Cooper to the Ashley River, wherein our pretty little village lies, was sought as a refuge from the fever lands of the low country. 9
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    and three less than Aiken. The air does not become saturated with moisture as it does elsewhere, being as dry soon after a shower as though it had not rained. Dr. Robert Harvey, now holding a leading position in the medical corps of the British army in India, after making a thorough examination of the climate and porous soil of Summerville, states that it is superior to both Acachon and Bornemouth, the celebrated French and English resorts, because it is dryer and has a more equable temperature. In addition to the sandy porous soil, which quickly dries, Summerville is built on a succession of small hills; of gentle declivity, the configuration of the surface running off the water very rapidly. TEMPERATURE. Its average mean maximum and minimum temperature for sixteen years was 71.6 degrees and 58.9 degrees. In winter it is out of the influence of the east winds, which frequently prevail on the coast, making the temperature mild and equable; yet it is tempered by the breeze from the ocean, twenty-two miles distant, and the atmosphere loses the extreme aridity of a sandy plain, or the dryness of a barren. But Summerville never has that hot temperature and heavy atmosphere which produce the enervating and debilitating features peculiar to Florida and points further South. OUR PINES. Summerville lies in the heart of a very forest of towering pines, which stand as rigid sentinels to guard the public health, stringent laws prohibiting their being cut down, even in private grounds, summerville is the only town THAT HAS SUCH A LAW. 11
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    `WHAT SUMMERVILLE IS NOT. It is not a hot climate, enervating and debilitating. It is not a cold climate, where chilly blasts and keen winds keep the visitor indoors. It is not a little village with a depot, a side track and an overgrown hotel its only attractions; where the monotonous life necessarily grows tiresome and there is no incentive for exercise. But it is a large place with a palatial hotel, handsome residences, pretty walks, fine drives, accessible to many points famous in story and verse; only twenty-two miles from Charleston, one of the most historic and interesting cities in the United States. The visitor combines necessary exercise with sight-seeing, thus lending variety to his sojourn. It is thoroughly inland, sheltered entirely from the coast, yet but forty minutes' distance from an entirely different climate, where the tourist may promenade on the Charleston Battery, and gaze upon one of the most beautiful bays on the Atlantic coast. WHAT SUMMERVILLE HAS. A population of five thousand. Churches of almost every denomination. Excellent schools, both public and private, well organized, with not only competent but highly cultured teachers. An art school; a circulating library. A newspaper; a literary magazine. An efficient fire department. Lodges of Knights of Pythias, and Knights of Honor. Well Lighted by Electricity. Pure and delicious water. A perfect system of sanitary drainage. No mud, the soil being sandy and porous. A longer season than Florida resorts. Cordial and hospitable citizens, at all times ready to oblige strangers and assist them in their plans. 12
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    A postoffice with money order department and five deliveries daily. An express and telegraph office. Excellent stores, whose stock is replenished daily from the markets of Charleston and New York. Very able physicians. HOTELS It has the finest hotel in the South. The palatial Pine Forest Inn, equipped with every modern convenience, its appointments combining tastefulness and elegance with every luxury and comfort. Electric lights. Elevator. Unexcelled cuisine, pure water, perfect drainage. Billiard room. Tennis court. Good livery. Complete service. Lawn tennis, three fine bowling alleys, a very fine eighteen hole golf link and hardly a day during the season that golf cannot be enjoyed not like places further north where cold weather and snows often prevent out door amusements. ITS ACCESSIBILITY. Summerville is distant from Charleston but twenty- two miles in space, and forty minutes time; and is connected with that city by eight daily trains each way. It is connected by the Southern Railway with Charleston, Columbia and Augusta, and is but twenty-two hours from the great Northern and Western centers of population. The Southern Railway also makes connections with the A. C. L. and Clyde Line, giving outlets in every direction. Via the Southern Railway two through trains arrive from the North daily. It is a short route to the West and Northwest. Via the Atlantic Coast Line through trains arrive daily; the magnificent Vestibule Train, with Parlor and Buffet service, leaves Charleston and arrives there three times a week each way, giving the tourist every luxury of modern travel. 13
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    japonica, violets and many other fine flowers are in bloom; indeed, every month of the year has its blossems to make joyous its own season. POINTS OF INTEREST. Ruins of the Old Fort and Church of the ancient Town of Dorchester, of Colonial and Revolutionary fame, known to have been standing since 1719, four miles distant. It was built of shell rock on a high bluff overlooking the Ashley River. The present scene is worthy an artist's study. Schultz Lake, a picturesque spot, famous for fishing, within easy driving distance. "Pinehurst," skirting the town limits, the experimental tea farm and gardens of Dr. Chas. U. Shepard, containing 500 acres, here and there dotted with picturesque little cottages, beautiful drives winding through tea, fruit and floral farms, bordered on either side by gorgeous blossoms. The Old White Church, four miles distant, the oldest of its order in the State. It is now a mass of picturesque ruins. Built in 1696. Along the banks of the Ashley made memorable by many Revolutionary skirmishes, beautified by many fine residences and the most beautiful gardens in the United States, among the most noted, the far-famed Magnolia-on the-Ashley, which few tourists fail to visit. Besides many rare trees and shrubs there may be seen there forests of camelias of every variety, many of them twenty feet in height. But the glory of the garden is in the gorgeous coloring of its azaleas, some of the bushes being nineteen and twenty feet wide and thirteen feet high, solid masses of blossoms in all shades, from palest pink to deepest crimson, and now and then a pure white bush, '' like a bride in her snowy lace." The imagination cannot paint the gorgeous grandeur of this garden. The Northwestern visitor must see to believe possible the magic effect of this wonderous wealth of magnificent blossoms. This scene alone is worthy a very long trip and many tourists return at different times to take a peep at Magnolia-on-the-Ashley in its many phases. Like Magnolia Gardens, the Middleton Place has remained in the same family since the days of the Revolution. 15
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    It is noted for its beautiful lawn and stately terraces. Here is the tomb of Arthur Middleton, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. Drayton Hall, a spacious and imposing brick residence built in 1740, still kept in excellent preservation, the property having been in the present family since 1671. On it are located extensive phosphate mines. It was Cornwallis' headquarters in 1780. St. Andrew's Church, built in 1706, still well preserved, is a quaint little structure. Colonel Washington's Fort, memorable in the annals of 1776. GogsE Creek Church, built in 1711, kept always in excellent repair, standing at the present day with things as of yore. The Royal Arms of Great Britain are emblazoned in the walls, as also the coat of arms of the neighboring families. Old Oak Avenue, on "Oaks" plantation, near Goose Creek Church, the scene of many stirring events, graphically described in Gilmore Simms' novels. Crowfield Plantation, where are the ruins of perhaps the finest colonial establishment in South Carolina. Yeaman's Hall, the residence of Landgrave Smith, Colonial Governor of South Carolina, with its secret underground passages beneath the garden to the river. Also a secret chamber where prisoners and treasures have been safely concealed through the Revolutionary and recent wars. Old Colonial Oak at Ingleside. This huge tree is the marvel of tourists. Tradition says that nnder its historic shade General Marion invited the British officers to partake of his dinner of sweet potatoes. Here is also the family burying ground with tombstones over a century old. The old brick mansion still remains in perfect preservation and is now used as a Club House for the guests of the Inn. There are 1700 acres in the Ingleside track and a fine lake which give guests of the Inn who are fond of hunting a fine private preserve to hunt on. It is impossible, in this limited space, to mention the numerous points of interest around Charleston, whose conspicuous place on the pages of American history have made their names household words. 16
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Title:
Pine Forest Inn: Winter Resort (1909)
Date:
1909
Description:
1909 booklet advertising the Pine Forest Inn, a Summerville, S.C. resort which opened in 1891. The description emphasizes the Inn's luxury accomodations, and the beneficial climate and health benefits of wintering in Summerville
Collection:
Lowcountry Tourism
Contributing Institution:
College of Charleston Libraries
Media Type:
Images
Personal or Corporate Subject:
Pine Forest Inn (Summerville, S.C.)
Topical Subject:
Winter resorts -- South Carolina – Summerville
Geographic Subject:
Summerville (S.C.) -- Description and travel, Low Country
Shelving Locator:
F279.S9 P5 1909
S.C. County:
Charleston County (S.C.)
Material Type:
image/jpeg
Digitization Specifications:
300 ppi, 24-bit depth, color, Epson Expression 10000XL, Archival Masters are tiffs
Copyright Status Statement:
Digital image copyright 2010, The College of Charleston. All rights reserved. For more information contact The College of Charleston Library, Charleston, SC 29424