Pine Forest Inn: Winter Resort (1893)

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    Pine Forest Inn Summerville, S.C. A Winter Resort Harvey Denison, Manager
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    Pine Forest Inn
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    Summerville, South Carolina (From the News and Courier of Charleston, S. C, Dec. 5th, 1890.) Summerville was discovered, so to speak, by neighboring planters. They found while hunting on this ridge of pines, which lies between the Ashley and Cooper Rivers, and which arises to a height of about seventy feet above the sea, a peculiarly soft and balmy atmosphere, and a freedom from annoying insects not elsewhere observable in this section of the State. Soon afterwards they built summer houses here, and from that beginning the place has slowly reached its present proportions, and its population of about 3,000 souls. Although famous for its healthfulness for more than half a century, its reputation was practically confined to South Carolina, until some two years ago it was telegraphed throughout the world that the physicians then attending
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    Front Porch
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    the Tuberculosis Congress, at Paris, had pronounced it to be one of the two best resorts on earth for the cure of throat and lung disorder. They might have said the best, for it is the only place of the kind where the pines are protected by law, and where they are thickly scattered throughout the town instead of bordering upon it. There is on file here a letter from Dr. Robert Harvey (now holding a leading position in the medical corps of the British army in India), written after he had made a thorough examination of the climate and porous soil of Summerville, which states that it is superior to both Acachon and Bornemouth, the celebrated French and English resorts, because it is dryer and has a more equable temperature. Its mean rain-fall for nineteen years was 56.76 inches, and its average mean maximum and minimum temperature for sixteen years was 71.6 degrees and 58.9 degrees.
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    Parlor
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    The endorsement of the physicians of the Parisian Congress naturally caused the people of Summerville, who had for years been aware of the wonderful curative and invigorating properties of their pine- land air, to prepare the town for its manifest destiny. The local government successfully completed a very perfect system of drainage. It placed lamps upon the streets and enforced sanitary laws to meet the prospective change of conditions. Aside from its climate, which is conceded to be free from the enervating feature peculiar to points further South, articles were published from time to time to show the eligibility of Summerville to become a great health resort, and some of these advantages are briefly referred to, as follows:
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    Main Dining Room
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    Its Accessibility 1 Summerville is connected- by the South Carolina Railway from Charleston, Columbia and Augusta, and is but twenty-four hours from the great North-Western centres of population. 2 It is Distant from Charleston but twenty-two miles in space, and but forty minutes time and is connected with that city by seven daily trains each way. 3 Although Summerville is furnished with churches, representing nearly all religious denominations, together with good schools, market stores, boarding houses and liveries, and is also a telegraph and express station, its proximity to Charleston adds greatly to its attractiveness, because its residents can procure all the comforts, luxuries and amusements that belong to a Rotunda
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    large city. It should make some difference to an invalid whether he goes to a pine-land hotel provided with one resident physician, or whether he can consult a medical fraternity that has given the illustrious Sims and other distinguished practitioners to the country. 4 The fact that Summerville, Charleston and Sullivan's Island, although within an hour of each other, provide three distinct and different phases of climate, and also that the season here will be longer than it is at Florida resorts. 5 The natural beauts of Summerville and its interesting surroundings, the tea, fruit and floral farms of Professor Shepard, the ruins of the fort and of the tower of Dorchester, the ancient churches of Goose Creek and St. Andrews, Middleton place, Drayton Hall, the Gardens at Magnolia, and other colonial places, will all prove of interest to tourists. The Drives are extensive and charming.
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    These and other advantages, together with the reflection that the population of the United States now number 60,000,000, and that (as compared with other diseases) a large percentage of the people are afflicted with throat or lung trouble, gave rise to the determination to build at Summerville the UMne jForest Unn. Nervousness and insomnia yield quickly to the beneficial influence of the pine-laden atmosphere. The worst cases of asthma are permanently benefited and mild ones cured. The Pine Forest Inn is a handsome and superbly constructed building standing upon a plateau of fifty- two acres, beautifully wooded with pines interspersed with live-oaks, from which the rain-fall naturally flows into an adjacent creek, affording perfect drainage of the entire property and its surroundings.
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    It is a modern structure in every respect and has all the latest improvements for comfort and convenience. The arrangement of rooms is such, that there are single rooms with or without private bath, as well, as suites for family parties. The lighting is by an Edison improved electric plant. The heating is amply secured by a combination of open fires, steam radiators, and the fan system of hot air, this latter also insuring perfect ventilation. Every sleeping-room in the house has direct sunshine upon it during some portion of the day, and nearly every room has fire-place 4 for pine-knot open fire. The stables
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    The parlor, rotunda and Dining-room are beautifully finished in Southern curly pine which is very pleasing. The design of the owners and the aim of the manager is to provide here a model home possessing so far as possible all the composure and refinement found usually in such. The large and cosily furnished sun parlor will be found a popular apartment. A telegraph office with through wires is provided. The elevator is one of Whittier Machine Co's., best hydraulic constructions. The milk supply is from our own herd of Jerseys, insuring the best quality of that important requisite. The supplies of meats and other foods will be brought from New York markets. Fresh fish and other supplies of suitable nature will be brought from Charleston markets as that city is only forty minutes distant by frequent trains. The water supply is ample and is from an Artesian well, while the table water is charcoal filtered. Pinery
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    A Cottage at Summerville An orchestra of selected artists will be a feature during the season. With the popular amusements of billiards, bowling, tennis etc., there are coupled those of Delightful Drives through adjacent pine country, and saddle rides over interesting bridle paths. A livery stable with first class appointments, safe horses and competent drivers is conducted in connection with the Inn. Saddle horses suitable for ladies use, and for fox hunting will be provided. The shooting is of a very satisfactory character. The game consisting of quail, wild turkeys, foxes and deer. Guests bringing their own horses and dogs can have them well cared for at our stables and kennels at reasonable rates. Fishing also can be enjoyed at Shultz Lake, near by. 13
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    What do I think of Summerville? I think it is the earthly paradise. I shall never forget its balmy, life-giving air, and the lovely drives through its pine woods, which I am always hoping to take over again. I recall, with a sigh of longing, spring days or winter days that seemed like spring, when I have driven for hours through those balm-breathing forests, never quite ready to turn back and go indoors again. I can think of nothing that would be pleasanter than to repeat these experiences. As a question of health the place has done so much good to certain invalids I, myself know, that I could hardly speak of it too strongly from that point of view. Louise Chandler Moulton 15
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    Pine Forest Inn Winter Resort Summerville, South Carolina Announcement The season of 1893-4, the third of this hotel, will begin November 15th. The property has been put in the best condition by a general renovation and the purchase of much new equipment. The management has been placed in the hands of Mr. Harvey S. Denison, formerly of the New Grand Hotel, Catskill Mountains, the Piney Woods Hotel, Thomasville, Georgia, and the Huntsville Hotel, Huntsville, Alabama, whose success in handling these well-known resorts insures good results here. Until November 15th Mr. Denison will have his offices at Murray Hill Hotel, New York City, and Hotel Richelieu, Chicago. The Transient are $4.00 per day. Weekly rates according to location of room will be quoted on application. Art Press Longhead Co.: Philadelphia
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Title:
Pine Forest Inn: Winter Resort (1893)
Date:
1893
Description:
1893 booklet advertising the Pine Forest Inn, a Summerville, S.C. resort which opened in 1891. Includes several images of the Inn and its grounds, and describes the Inn's accomodations and the health benefits of Summerville
Collection:
Lowcountry Tourism
Contributing Institution:
College of Charleston Libraries
Media Type:
Images
Personal or Corporate Subject:
Pine Forest Inn (Summerville, S.C.)
Topical Subject:
Winter resorts -- South Carolina – Summerville
Geographic Subject:
Summerville (S.C.) -- Description and travel, Low Country
Shelving Locator:
F279.S9 P5 1893
S.C. County:
Charleston County (S.C.)
Material Type:
image/jpeg
Digitization Specifications:
300 ppi, 24-bit depth, color, Epson Expression 10000XL, Archival Masters are tiffs
Copyright Status Statement:
Digital image copyright 2010, The College of Charleston. All rights reserved. For more information contact The College of Charleston Library, Charleston, SC 29424