Letter from C.C. Tseng to Laura M. Bragg, February 20, 1928

  • Image 01
    The Citadel Charleston, S.C. Feb. 20, 1928 Dear Miss Bragg, Forgive me for my ingratitude! Forgive me for my hard-heartedness! You are trying to do everything to make us happy; you have sacrificed your welfare to make a home for us in a land of strangers. You have done everything, nay more than everything, that a mother does to her children, but I, ho, how it pains me! I am the only infilial [sic] son! In return I have made you exceedingly unhappy, especially when you are very ill. It is a great sin! No one can ever give his forgive--ness to such an unkind heart! I repent, but too late. The deed is done. What else can I do? There is no way left but repentance and begging for forgiveness, forgiveness for my ingratitude, forgiveness for my hard-heartedness! But, dear Miss Bragg, don't think that I don't have a heart, hard as it may be sometimes. I am always thinking about your health. I am always thinking about how to make [2] you happy. True or untrue, the other boys will tell. I have never been happy in my life, I confess, and never shall be! I had lost my dear mother in my boyhood. I have had a hard struggle with the old society. I have fought for my economic independence. I nearly lost my life three times for my country. I have been a strong sympathizer with the poor masses, still is and shall ever be. I know I have a great task and a hard time, waiting for me. When-ever my mind is unoccupied, all these dark thoughts would appear in vividness. But before you I always keep up a cheerful countenance though sometimes entirely against my hear, because I fear that I might damp the happy atmosphere. That comment, oh that hateful comment-I made has all of a sudden overshadowed all what I have attempted for a long time to create and forever cast a stain upon me. What can I do to defend myself, but asking for forgiveness.[3] But, dear Miss Bragg, that comment was never meant to be a personal attack. It is only the language of an aching soul; it is only a fractional portion of my intense feeling toward the large suffering masses. I would be exceedingly unkind if I have such sinful meaning against you who are so motherly to me. I only raise my voice against this unfriendly world, this unjust world. I know what you are. I know what you are doing. I know what you are struggling for. I cannot be so blind and so ignorant as to shift a personal attack against you, although I have used or misquoted some of your words and phrases. You are trying by every means to help china and to create better understanding between the U.S. and China. I appreciate your work with gratitude. Please don't think that I am so heartless as to say that you can not sympathize with the poor masses. I was exceedingly unhappy last few weeks [4] news from home always brings to me stories of murder and blood-shed. My dearest friend, Miss Lin, is again in prison. The negro [sic] spirituals always haunt me, because their faces, their voices, and the words in the songs, always make me think about that greatest tragedy in human history. Last Sunday I alone drove to Folly Beach and spent few hours there to cool my scorched brain and to soothe my aching soul. When coming back, I therefore started to read "The Right to be Happy." Your comments there naturally gave me a chance to utter some painful cry from my heart. During the time when I wrote my comments, I was entirely under the sway of my strong feeling and intense hatred against the unjust world. I did not know what I was doing. But one thing is certain, that I don't have any meaning of a personal attack. Dear Miss Bragg, do believe me and understand me! You and I are all sufferers. I was unhappy [5] and made you unhappy; I am therefore the more un--happy. But anyhow I am not courteous; I am not sensible that you are still ill. I have committed a great sin. I can't for give myself, but I still keep on asking for your motherly forgiveness. Oh, my poor pen! I can not express one thousandth of my heart. But still for give me! Forgive me, I pray! Hoping you will recover soon! Very truly yours, Ching-Chi Tseng
  • Image 01
    The Citadel Charleston, S.C. Feb. 20, 1928 Dear Miss Bragg, Forgive me for my ingratitude! Forgive me for my hard-heartedness! You are trying to do everything to make us happy; you have sacrificed your welfare to make a home for us in a land of strangers. You have done everything, nay more than everything, that a mother does to her children, but I, ho, how it pains me! I am the only infilial [sic] son! In return I have made you exceedingly unhappy, especially when you are very ill. It is a great sin! No one can ever give his forgive--ness to such an unkind heart! I repent, but too late. The deed is done. What else can I do? There is no way left but repentance and begging for forgiveness, forgiveness for my ingratitude, forgiveness for my hard-heartedness! But, dear Miss Bragg, don't think that I don't have a heart, hard as it may be sometimes. I am always thinking about your health. I am always thinking about how to make [2] you happy. True or untrue, the other boys will tell. I have never been happy in my life, I confess, and never shall be! I had lost my dear mother in my boyhood. I have had a hard struggle with the old society. I have fought for my economic independence. I nearly lost my life three times for my country. I have been a strong sympathizer with the poor masses, still is and shall ever be. I know I have a great task and a hard time, waiting for me. When-ever my mind is unoccupied, all these dark thoughts would appear in vividness. But before you I always keep up a cheerful countenance though sometimes entirely against my hear, because I fear that I might damp the happy atmosphere. That comment, oh that hateful comment-I made has all of a sudden overshadowed all what I have attempted for a long time to create and forever cast a stain upon me. What can I do to defend myself, but asking for forgiveness.[3] But, dear Miss Bragg, that comment was never meant to be a personal attack. It is only the language of an aching soul; it is only a fractional portion of my intense feeling toward the large suffering masses. I would be exceedingly unkind if I have such sinful meaning against you who are so motherly to me. I only raise my voice against this unfriendly world, this unjust world. I know what you are. I know what you are doing. I know what you are struggling for. I cannot be so blind and so ignorant as to shift a personal attack against you, although I have used or misquoted some of your words and phrases. You are trying by every means to help china and to create better understanding between the U.S. and China. I appreciate your work with gratitude. Please don't think that I am so heartless as to say that you can not sympathize with the poor masses. I was exceedingly unhappy last few weeks [4] news from home always brings to me stories of murder and blood-shed. My dearest friend, Miss Lin, is again in prison. The negro [sic] spirituals always haunt me, because their faces, their voices, and the words in the songs, always make me think about that greatest tragedy in human history. Last Sunday I alone drove to Folly Beach and spent few hours there to cool my scorched brain and to soothe my aching soul. When coming back, I therefore started to read "The Right to be Happy." Your comments there naturally gave me a chance to utter some painful cry from my heart. During the time when I wrote my comments, I was entirely under the sway of my strong feeling and intense hatred against the unjust world. I did not know what I was doing. But one thing is certain, that I don't have any meaning of a personal attack. Dear Miss Bragg, do believe me and understand me! You and I are all sufferers. I was unhappy [5] and made you unhappy; I am therefore the more un--happy. But anyhow I am not courteous; I am not sensible that you are still ill. I have committed a great sin. I can't for give myself, but I still keep on asking for your motherly forgiveness. Oh, my poor pen! I can not express one thousandth of my heart. But still for give me! Forgive me, I pray! Hoping you will recover soon! Very truly yours, Ching-Chi Tseng
  • Image 01
    The Citadel Charleston, S.C. Feb. 20, 1928 Dear Miss Bragg, Forgive me for my ingratitude! Forgive me for my hard-heartedness! You are trying to do everything to make us happy; you have sacrificed your welfare to make a home for us in a land of strangers. You have done everything, nay more than everything, that a mother does to her children, but I, ho, how it pains me! I am the only infilial [sic] son! In return I have made you exceedingly unhappy, especially when you are very ill. It is a great sin! No one can ever give his forgive--ness to such an unkind heart! I repent, but too late. The deed is done. What else can I do? There is no way left but repentance and begging for forgiveness, forgiveness for my ingratitude, forgiveness for my hard-heartedness! But, dear Miss Bragg, don't think that I don't have a heart, hard as it may be sometimes. I am always thinking about your health. I am always thinking about how to make [2] you happy. True or untrue, the other boys will tell. I have never been happy in my life, I confess, and never shall be! I had lost my dear mother in my boyhood. I have had a hard struggle with the old society. I have fought for my economic independence. I nearly lost my life three times for my country. I have been a strong sympathizer with the poor masses, still is and shall ever be. I know I have a great task and a hard time, waiting for me. When-ever my mind is unoccupied, all these dark thoughts would appear in vividness. But before you I always keep up a cheerful countenance though sometimes entirely against my hear, because I fear that I might damp the happy atmosphere. That comment, oh that hateful comment-I made has all of a sudden overshadowed all what I have attempted for a long time to create and forever cast a stain upon me. What can I do to defend myself, but asking for forgiveness.[3] But, dear Miss Bragg, that comment was never meant to be a personal attack. It is only the language of an aching soul; it is only a fractional portion of my intense feeling toward the large suffering masses. I would be exceedingly unkind if I have such sinful meaning against you who are so motherly to me. I only raise my voice against this unfriendly world, this unjust world. I know what you are. I know what you are doing. I know what you are struggling for. I cannot be so blind and so ignorant as to shift a personal attack against you, although I have used or misquoted some of your words and phrases. You are trying by every means to help china and to create better understanding between the U.S. and China. I appreciate your work with gratitude. Please don't think that I am so heartless as to say that you can not sympathize with the poor masses. I was exceedingly unhappy last few weeks [4] news from home always brings to me stories of murder and blood-shed. My dearest friend, Miss Lin, is again in prison. The negro [sic] spirituals always haunt me, because their faces, their voices, and the words in the songs, always make me think about that greatest tragedy in human history. Last Sunday I alone drove to Folly Beach and spent few hours there to cool my scorched brain and to soothe my aching soul. When coming back, I therefore started to read "The Right to be Happy." Your comments there naturally gave me a chance to utter some painful cry from my heart. During the time when I wrote my comments, I was entirely under the sway of my strong feeling and intense hatred against the unjust world. I did not know what I was doing. But one thing is certain, that I don't have any meaning of a personal attack. Dear Miss Bragg, do believe me and understand me! You and I are all sufferers. I was unhappy [5] and made you unhappy; I am therefore the more un--happy. But anyhow I am not courteous; I am not sensible that you are still ill. I have committed a great sin. I can't for give myself, but I still keep on asking for your motherly forgiveness. Oh, my poor pen! I can not express one thousandth of my heart. But still for give me! Forgive me, I pray! Hoping you will recover soon! Very truly yours, Ching-Chi Tseng
  • Image 01
    The Citadel Charleston, S.C. Feb. 20, 1928 Dear Miss Bragg, Forgive me for my ingratitude! Forgive me for my hard-heartedness! You are trying to do everything to make us happy; you have sacrificed your welfare to make a home for us in a land of strangers. You have done everything, nay more than everything, that a mother does to her children, but I, ho, how it pains me! I am the only infilial [sic] son! In return I have made you exceedingly unhappy, especially when you are very ill. It is a great sin! No one can ever give his forgive--ness to such an unkind heart! I repent, but too late. The deed is done. What else can I do? There is no way left but repentance and begging for forgiveness, forgiveness for my ingratitude, forgiveness for my hard-heartedness! But, dear Miss Bragg, don't think that I don't have a heart, hard as it may be sometimes. I am always thinking about your health. I am always thinking about how to make [2] you happy. True or untrue, the other boys will tell. I have never been happy in my life, I confess, and never shall be! I had lost my dear mother in my boyhood. I have had a hard struggle with the old society. I have fought for my economic independence. I nearly lost my life three times for my country. I have been a strong sympathizer with the poor masses, still is and shall ever be. I know I have a great task and a hard time, waiting for me. When-ever my mind is unoccupied, all these dark thoughts would appear in vividness. But before you I always keep up a cheerful countenance though sometimes entirely against my hear, because I fear that I might damp the happy atmosphere. That comment, oh that hateful comment-I made has all of a sudden overshadowed all what I have attempted for a long time to create and forever cast a stain upon me. What can I do to defend myself, but asking for forgiveness.[3] But, dear Miss Bragg, that comment was never meant to be a personal attack. It is only the language of an aching soul; it is only a fractional portion of my intense feeling toward the large suffering masses. I would be exceedingly unkind if I have such sinful meaning against you who are so motherly to me. I only raise my voice against this unfriendly world, this unjust world. I know what you are. I know what you are doing. I know what you are struggling for. I cannot be so blind and so ignorant as to shift a personal attack against you, although I have used or misquoted some of your words and phrases. You are trying by every means to help china and to create better understanding between the U.S. and China. I appreciate your work with gratitude. Please don't think that I am so heartless as to say that you can not sympathize with the poor masses. I was exceedingly unhappy last few weeks [4] news from home always brings to me stories of murder and blood-shed. My dearest friend, Miss Lin, is again in prison. The negro [sic] spirituals always haunt me, because their faces, their voices, and the words in the songs, always make me think about that greatest tragedy in human history. Last Sunday I alone drove to Folly Beach and spent few hours there to cool my scorched brain and to soothe my aching soul. When coming back, I therefore started to read "The Right to be Happy." Your comments there naturally gave me a chance to utter some painful cry from my heart. During the time when I wrote my comments, I was entirely under the sway of my strong feeling and intense hatred against the unjust world. I did not know what I was doing. But one thing is certain, that I don't have any meaning of a personal attack. Dear Miss Bragg, do believe me and understand me! You and I are all sufferers. I was unhappy [5] and made you unhappy; I am therefore the more un--happy. But anyhow I am not courteous; I am not sensible that you are still ill. I have committed a great sin. I can't for give myself, but I still keep on asking for your motherly forgiveness. Oh, my poor pen! I can not express one thousandth of my heart. But still for give me! Forgive me, I pray! Hoping you will recover soon! Very truly yours, Ching-Chi Tseng
  • Image 01
    The Citadel Charleston, S.C. Feb. 20, 1928 Dear Miss Bragg, Forgive me for my ingratitude! Forgive me for my hard-heartedness! You are trying to do everything to make us happy; you have sacrificed your welfare to make a home for us in a land of strangers. You have done everything, nay more than everything, that a mother does to her children, but I, ho, how it pains me! I am the only infilial [sic] son! In return I have made you exceedingly unhappy, especially when you are very ill. It is a great sin! No one can ever give his forgive--ness to such an unkind heart! I repent, but too late. The deed is done. What else can I do? There is no way left but repentance and begging for forgiveness, forgiveness for my ingratitude, forgiveness for my hard-heartedness! But, dear Miss Bragg, don't think that I don't have a heart, hard as it may be sometimes. I am always thinking about your health. I am always thinking about how to make [2] you happy. True or untrue, the other boys will tell. I have never been happy in my life, I confess, and never shall be! I had lost my dear mother in my boyhood. I have had a hard struggle with the old society. I have fought for my economic independence. I nearly lost my life three times for my country. I have been a strong sympathizer with the poor masses, still is and shall ever be. I know I have a great task and a hard time, waiting for me. When-ever my mind is unoccupied, all these dark thoughts would appear in vividness. But before you I always keep up a cheerful countenance though sometimes entirely against my hear, because I fear that I might damp the happy atmosphere. That comment, oh that hateful comment-I made has all of a sudden overshadowed all what I have attempted for a long time to create and forever cast a stain upon me. What can I do to defend myself, but asking for forgiveness.[3] But, dear Miss Bragg, that comment was never meant to be a personal attack. It is only the language of an aching soul; it is only a fractional portion of my intense feeling toward the large suffering masses. I would be exceedingly unkind if I have such sinful meaning against you who are so motherly to me. I only raise my voice against this unfriendly world, this unjust world. I know what you are. I know what you are doing. I know what you are struggling for. I cannot be so blind and so ignorant as to shift a personal attack against you, although I have used or misquoted some of your words and phrases. You are trying by every means to help china and to create better understanding between the U.S. and China. I appreciate your work with gratitude. Please don't think that I am so heartless as to say that you can not sympathize with the poor masses. I was exceedingly unhappy last few weeks [4] news from home always brings to me stories of murder and blood-shed. My dearest friend, Miss Lin, is again in prison. The negro [sic] spirituals always haunt me, because their faces, their voices, and the words in the songs, always make me think about that greatest tragedy in human history. Last Sunday I alone drove to Folly Beach and spent few hours there to cool my scorched brain and to soothe my aching soul. When coming back, I therefore started to read "The Right to be Happy." Your comments there naturally gave me a chance to utter some painful cry from my heart. During the time when I wrote my comments, I was entirely under the sway of my strong feeling and intense hatred against the unjust world. I did not know what I was doing. But one thing is certain, that I don't have any meaning of a personal attack. Dear Miss Bragg, do believe me and understand me! You and I are all sufferers. I was unhappy [5] and made you unhappy; I am therefore the more un--happy. But anyhow I am not courteous; I am not sensible that you are still ill. I have committed a great sin. I can't for give myself, but I still keep on asking for your motherly forgiveness. Oh, my poor pen! I can not express one thousandth of my heart. But still for give me! Forgive me, I pray! Hoping you will recover soon! Very truly yours, Ching-Chi Tseng
Title:
Letter from C.C. Tseng to Laura M. Bragg, February 20, 1928
Creator:
Tseng, Ching-Chi
Date:
1928-02-20
Description:
In this five-page handwritten letter, C.C. Tseng apologizes for a remark made to Miss Bragg. He writes of his concern for the imprisoned Miss Lin.
Collection:
Laura Bragg Papers
Contributing Institution:
The Citadel Archives & Museum
Media Type:
Manuscripts
Personal or Corporate Subject:
Bragg, Laura M. (Laura Mary), 1881-1978, Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina
Topical Subject:
Forgiveness
Geographic Subject:
Charleston (S.C.)
Language:
English
Shelving Locator:
Bragg Box 5 Folder 1-003(1)
S.C. County:
Charleston County (S.C.)
Internet Media Type:
image/jpeg
Digitization Specifications:
600 dpi, 24-bit depth, color, Epson Expression 10000XL, Archival masters are tiffs.
Copyright Status Statement:
Copyright © The Citadel Archives and Museum.
Access Information:
For more information contact The Citadel Archives and Museum at Daniel Library, The Citadel, 171 Moultrie Street, Charleston, SC 29409.