Letter from C.C. Tseng to Laura M. Bragg, September 1, 1928

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    Snug Harbor, Sept. 1, 1928. Dear Miss Bragg, I have tried to write to you several times, but all attempts failed. My heart is full; yet my tongue seems to be extremely lacking of words. I sup-pose this is always the case with those who are experiencing sudden joy or deep grief. My decision to leave this dear place has long been made, everything is now well arranged, and a new world is waiting for me, ---- an unknown world; but my heart begins to feel the great loss i am going to suffer. You said that I am wise to go. I think so too. I got too few Chinese friends here who have the same ideals, same believes [sic] and same habits with me. I suffered greatly, yet silently because I respect all of them in some other ways. I craved for my spiritual freedom long ago.Now I have marked out my own emancipation. [2] On the other hand this spiritual liber-ation is too dearly bought. I am leaving away your warm friendship, kindness, sympathy, encouragement, and affection if I deserve it, which have softened my heart which has become hardened when young through various encoun-ters with the indifferent world. I was not prepared to find such kindness, especially in the foreign land. It at first made me cry because I have been ac-customed to coldness, indifferences, and struggle, and have acquired the charac-ter of being independant, to always stand on my own feet and defy the whole world single-handedly if it needs be. I cried, not because you did not give enough, but because your kindness sometimes made me feel my sufferings the keener and feel myself the more alone. Dear Miss Bragg, please don't misunderstand me here if my poor language is liable to be misunderstood. I have received and will receive your kindness [3] with all my heart and will deepest grati-tude, although I feel a little timid sometimes to express myself. Please always be kind to me so that I can make myself believe that beside family affection and love there is still innocent, disinterested, warm friendship in this world. I will always remember you in the time of despair, in this country or in the distant lands. I plan to leave Charleston as soon as possible, and will meet you at the time and place suggested. I always felt exceedingly happy when you said something about Miss Lin {Tien-Shu -- her name. It means the essence of the sky, or as pure as the azure sky.}. She is not in Shanghai now, but is directing the party affairs in Tientsin. We all removed to town this morning because I am going to leave Charleston very soon. Mr. An always has the in-tention to go. I hope you will keep the car and we are not in need of [4] money. Mr. Lin is very certain now that he will stay here for one more year. Your "family" is only dwindled somewhat, but not yet broken up. Miss Richardson will be away to Flor-ida next Monday for her vacation and I also learned that Helen has been back from N.C. I think we will see her to-morrow in the museum. Some flowers in your garden have been destroyed by that storm we had about three weeks ago. But the gar-den is just as pretty and fresh as usual. I look forward to the seventh in Washington. I remain, Yours truly, I-Men. [Postscript] Thank you for the pictures you sent me. They were very pretty. [5] [From] C.C. Tseng, 38 Chalmers St. Charleston, S.C. [Addressed] Miss Laura M. Bragg, Epping, N.H.{lined out} The Valentine Museum Richmond, Virginia
  • Image 01
    Snug Harbor, Sept. 1, 1928. Dear Miss Bragg, I have tried to write to you several times, but all attempts failed. My heart is full; yet my tongue seems to be extremely lacking of words. I sup-pose this is always the case with those who are experiencing sudden joy or deep grief. My decision to leave this dear place has long been made, everything is now well arranged, and a new world is waiting for me, ---- an unknown world; but my heart begins to feel the great loss i am going to suffer. You said that I am wise to go. I think so too. I got too few Chinese friends here who have the same ideals, same believes [sic] and same habits with me. I suffered greatly, yet silently because I respect all of them in some other ways. I craved for my spiritual freedom long ago.Now I have marked out my own emancipation. [2] On the other hand this spiritual liber-ation is too dearly bought. I am leaving away your warm friendship, kindness, sympathy, encouragement, and affection if I deserve it, which have softened my heart which has become hardened when young through various encoun-ters with the indifferent world. I was not prepared to find such kindness, especially in the foreign land. It at first made me cry because I have been ac-customed to coldness, indifferences, and struggle, and have acquired the charac-ter of being independant, to always stand on my own feet and defy the whole world single-handedly if it needs be. I cried, not because you did not give enough, but because your kindness sometimes made me feel my sufferings the keener and feel myself the more alone. Dear Miss Bragg, please don't misunderstand me here if my poor language is liable to be misunderstood. I have received and will receive your kindness [3] with all my heart and will deepest grati-tude, although I feel a little timid sometimes to express myself. Please always be kind to me so that I can make myself believe that beside family affection and love there is still innocent, disinterested, warm friendship in this world. I will always remember you in the time of despair, in this country or in the distant lands. I plan to leave Charleston as soon as possible, and will meet you at the time and place suggested. I always felt exceedingly happy when you said something about Miss Lin {Tien-Shu -- her name. It means the essence of the sky, or as pure as the azure sky.}. She is not in Shanghai now, but is directing the party affairs in Tientsin. We all removed to town this morning because I am going to leave Charleston very soon. Mr. An always has the in-tention to go. I hope you will keep the car and we are not in need of [4] money. Mr. Lin is very certain now that he will stay here for one more year. Your "family" is only dwindled somewhat, but not yet broken up. Miss Richardson will be away to Flor-ida next Monday for her vacation and I also learned that Helen has been back from N.C. I think we will see her to-morrow in the museum. Some flowers in your garden have been destroyed by that storm we had about three weeks ago. But the gar-den is just as pretty and fresh as usual. I look forward to the seventh in Washington. I remain, Yours truly, I-Men. [Postscript] Thank you for the pictures you sent me. They were very pretty. [5] [From] C.C. Tseng, 38 Chalmers St. Charleston, S.C. [Addressed] Miss Laura M. Bragg, Epping, N.H.{lined out} The Valentine Museum Richmond, Virginia
  • Image 01
    Snug Harbor, Sept. 1, 1928. Dear Miss Bragg, I have tried to write to you several times, but all attempts failed. My heart is full; yet my tongue seems to be extremely lacking of words. I sup-pose this is always the case with those who are experiencing sudden joy or deep grief. My decision to leave this dear place has long been made, everything is now well arranged, and a new world is waiting for me, ---- an unknown world; but my heart begins to feel the great loss i am going to suffer. You said that I am wise to go. I think so too. I got too few Chinese friends here who have the same ideals, same believes [sic] and same habits with me. I suffered greatly, yet silently because I respect all of them in some other ways. I craved for my spiritual freedom long ago.Now I have marked out my own emancipation. [2] On the other hand this spiritual liber-ation is too dearly bought. I am leaving away your warm friendship, kindness, sympathy, encouragement, and affection if I deserve it, which have softened my heart which has become hardened when young through various encoun-ters with the indifferent world. I was not prepared to find such kindness, especially in the foreign land. It at first made me cry because I have been ac-customed to coldness, indifferences, and struggle, and have acquired the charac-ter of being independant, to always stand on my own feet and defy the whole world single-handedly if it needs be. I cried, not because you did not give enough, but because your kindness sometimes made me feel my sufferings the keener and feel myself the more alone. Dear Miss Bragg, please don't misunderstand me here if my poor language is liable to be misunderstood. I have received and will receive your kindness [3] with all my heart and will deepest grati-tude, although I feel a little timid sometimes to express myself. Please always be kind to me so that I can make myself believe that beside family affection and love there is still innocent, disinterested, warm friendship in this world. I will always remember you in the time of despair, in this country or in the distant lands. I plan to leave Charleston as soon as possible, and will meet you at the time and place suggested. I always felt exceedingly happy when you said something about Miss Lin {Tien-Shu -- her name. It means the essence of the sky, or as pure as the azure sky.}. She is not in Shanghai now, but is directing the party affairs in Tientsin. We all removed to town this morning because I am going to leave Charleston very soon. Mr. An always has the in-tention to go. I hope you will keep the car and we are not in need of [4] money. Mr. Lin is very certain now that he will stay here for one more year. Your "family" is only dwindled somewhat, but not yet broken up. Miss Richardson will be away to Flor-ida next Monday for her vacation and I also learned that Helen has been back from N.C. I think we will see her to-morrow in the museum. Some flowers in your garden have been destroyed by that storm we had about three weeks ago. But the gar-den is just as pretty and fresh as usual. I look forward to the seventh in Washington. I remain, Yours truly, I-Men. [Postscript] Thank you for the pictures you sent me. They were very pretty. [5] [From] C.C. Tseng, 38 Chalmers St. Charleston, S.C. [Addressed] Miss Laura M. Bragg, Epping, N.H.{lined out} The Valentine Museum Richmond, Virginia
  • Image 01
    Snug Harbor, Sept. 1, 1928. Dear Miss Bragg, I have tried to write to you several times, but all attempts failed. My heart is full; yet my tongue seems to be extremely lacking of words. I sup-pose this is always the case with those who are experiencing sudden joy or deep grief. My decision to leave this dear place has long been made, everything is now well arranged, and a new world is waiting for me, ---- an unknown world; but my heart begins to feel the great loss i am going to suffer. You said that I am wise to go. I think so too. I got too few Chinese friends here who have the same ideals, same believes [sic] and same habits with me. I suffered greatly, yet silently because I respect all of them in some other ways. I craved for my spiritual freedom long ago.Now I have marked out my own emancipation. [2] On the other hand this spiritual liber-ation is too dearly bought. I am leaving away your warm friendship, kindness, sympathy, encouragement, and affection if I deserve it, which have softened my heart which has become hardened when young through various encoun-ters with the indifferent world. I was not prepared to find such kindness, especially in the foreign land. It at first made me cry because I have been ac-customed to coldness, indifferences, and struggle, and have acquired the charac-ter of being independant, to always stand on my own feet and defy the whole world single-handedly if it needs be. I cried, not because you did not give enough, but because your kindness sometimes made me feel my sufferings the keener and feel myself the more alone. Dear Miss Bragg, please don't misunderstand me here if my poor language is liable to be misunderstood. I have received and will receive your kindness [3] with all my heart and will deepest grati-tude, although I feel a little timid sometimes to express myself. Please always be kind to me so that I can make myself believe that beside family affection and love there is still innocent, disinterested, warm friendship in this world. I will always remember you in the time of despair, in this country or in the distant lands. I plan to leave Charleston as soon as possible, and will meet you at the time and place suggested. I always felt exceedingly happy when you said something about Miss Lin {Tien-Shu -- her name. It means the essence of the sky, or as pure as the azure sky.}. She is not in Shanghai now, but is directing the party affairs in Tientsin. We all removed to town this morning because I am going to leave Charleston very soon. Mr. An always has the in-tention to go. I hope you will keep the car and we are not in need of [4] money. Mr. Lin is very certain now that he will stay here for one more year. Your "family" is only dwindled somewhat, but not yet broken up. Miss Richardson will be away to Flor-ida next Monday for her vacation and I also learned that Helen has been back from N.C. I think we will see her to-morrow in the museum. Some flowers in your garden have been destroyed by that storm we had about three weeks ago. But the gar-den is just as pretty and fresh as usual. I look forward to the seventh in Washington. I remain, Yours truly, I-Men. [Postscript] Thank you for the pictures you sent me. They were very pretty. [5] [From] C.C. Tseng, 38 Chalmers St. Charleston, S.C. [Addressed] Miss Laura M. Bragg, Epping, N.H.{lined out} The Valentine Museum Richmond, Virginia
  • Image 01
    Snug Harbor, Sept. 1, 1928. Dear Miss Bragg, I have tried to write to you several times, but all attempts failed. My heart is full; yet my tongue seems to be extremely lacking of words. I sup-pose this is always the case with those who are experiencing sudden joy or deep grief. My decision to leave this dear place has long been made, everything is now well arranged, and a new world is waiting for me, ---- an unknown world; but my heart begins to feel the great loss i am going to suffer. You said that I am wise to go. I think so too. I got too few Chinese friends here who have the same ideals, same believes [sic] and same habits with me. I suffered greatly, yet silently because I respect all of them in some other ways. I craved for my spiritual freedom long ago.Now I have marked out my own emancipation. [2] On the other hand this spiritual liber-ation is too dearly bought. I am leaving away your warm friendship, kindness, sympathy, encouragement, and affection if I deserve it, which have softened my heart which has become hardened when young through various encoun-ters with the indifferent world. I was not prepared to find such kindness, especially in the foreign land. It at first made me cry because I have been ac-customed to coldness, indifferences, and struggle, and have acquired the charac-ter of being independant, to always stand on my own feet and defy the whole world single-handedly if it needs be. I cried, not because you did not give enough, but because your kindness sometimes made me feel my sufferings the keener and feel myself the more alone. Dear Miss Bragg, please don't misunderstand me here if my poor language is liable to be misunderstood. I have received and will receive your kindness [3] with all my heart and will deepest grati-tude, although I feel a little timid sometimes to express myself. Please always be kind to me so that I can make myself believe that beside family affection and love there is still innocent, disinterested, warm friendship in this world. I will always remember you in the time of despair, in this country or in the distant lands. I plan to leave Charleston as soon as possible, and will meet you at the time and place suggested. I always felt exceedingly happy when you said something about Miss Lin {Tien-Shu -- her name. It means the essence of the sky, or as pure as the azure sky.}. She is not in Shanghai now, but is directing the party affairs in Tientsin. We all removed to town this morning because I am going to leave Charleston very soon. Mr. An always has the in-tention to go. I hope you will keep the car and we are not in need of [4] money. Mr. Lin is very certain now that he will stay here for one more year. Your "family" is only dwindled somewhat, but not yet broken up. Miss Richardson will be away to Flor-ida next Monday for her vacation and I also learned that Helen has been back from N.C. I think we will see her to-morrow in the museum. Some flowers in your garden have been destroyed by that storm we had about three weeks ago. But the gar-den is just as pretty and fresh as usual. I look forward to the seventh in Washington. I remain, Yours truly, I-Men. [Postscript] Thank you for the pictures you sent me. They were very pretty. [5] [From] C.C. Tseng, 38 Chalmers St. Charleston, S.C. [Addressed] Miss Laura M. Bragg, Epping, N.H.{lined out} The Valentine Museum Richmond, Virginia
Title:
Letter from C.C. Tseng to Laura M. Bragg, September 1, 1928
Creator:
Tseng, Ching-Chi
Date:
1928-09-01
Description:
In this four-page handwritten letter, C.C. Tseng writes of his sadness at leaving Charleston, South Carolina and Laura M. Bragg's friendship and company. Miss Bragg is at the Valentine Museum in Richmond, Virginia. C.C. Tseng mentions Chinese friends, Miss Lin, Mr. An, and Mr. Lin, and Charleston friends Miss Richardson and Helen. A recent storm destroyed some flowers in Miss Bragg's garden.
Collection:
Laura Bragg Papers
Contributing Institution:
The Citadel Archives & Museum
Media Type:
Manuscripts
Personal or Corporate Subject:
Bragg, Laura M. (Laura Mary), 1881-1978, Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina
Topical Subject:
Friendship
Geographic Subject:
Charleston County (S.C.)
Language:
English
Shelving Locator:
Bragg Box 5 Folder 1-008
S.C. County:
Charleston County (S.C.)
Internet Media Type:
image/jpeg
Digitization Specifications:
600 dpi, 24-bit depth, color, Epson Expression 10000XL, Archival masters are tiffs.
Copyright Status Statement:
Copyright © The Citadel Archives and Museum.
Access Information:
For more information contact The Citadel Archives and Museum at Daniel Library, The Citadel, 171 Moultrie Street, Charleston, SC 29409.