Periodicals

Eugene C. Hunt Papers, 1834 - 1994

Eugene C. Hunt

Eugene C. Hunt graduated from the Avery Normal School and went on to Talladega College, where he received a Degree in English in 1940. He earned a Master's Degree in Theater from Northwestern University in 1954 and continued with postgraduate study in Speech and Education. Mr. Hunt taught English and Speech at Burke High School in Charleston from 1941 to 1972. In 1972, he became an Assistant Professor of English and Speech at the College of Charleston, moving up to Associate Professor in 1985. He taught at the College until his retirement in 1992.

This collection contains numerous diverse materials that follow Mr. Hunt's interests and activities, especially education and African-American activism, Burke High School, and the College of Charleston. Materials include correspondence, pamphlets, periodicals, photographs, and other document and manuscript materials.

This collection was digitized and made freely accessible online through the generous support of the National Historical Publications & Records Commission

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Charleston Branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People Papers, 1920-1995

The Charleston Branch of the NAACP

The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) was started on February 12, 1909, partly in response to the prevalence of lynching of African-Americans in America and the 1908 race riot that occurred in Springfield, Illinois. The Charleston Branch of the NAACP was founded in February 1917 by Edwin Harleston. The branch was established to advocate for the rights of African Americans in South Carolina and Charleston. The Charleston NAACP serves as a space for African-Americans to make complaints against discriminatory practices; and to challenge social and economic inequalities. In addition, they spearheaded voter registration and education campaigns.

The Charleston Branch of National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) collection contains documents, manuscripts, periodicals, and pamphlets regarding branch and committee correspondence, financial records, materials relating to events and programs sponsored by the Association, branch newsletters, advertising flyers, and other outreach material.

This collection was digitized and made freely available online through the generous support of the National Historical Publications & Records Commission.

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J. Arthur Brown Papers, 1937 - 1988

J. Arthur Brown (1914-1988)

J. Arthur Brown was born in Charleston, South Carolina in 1914. After graduating from the Avery Institute in 1932 he continued his education at South Carolina State College in Orangeburg, SC graduating in 1937. While at SCSC, Brown met his future wife MaeDe Esperanza Myers (1918-2012), marrying in 1940. The couple had three daughters: MaeDe Joenelle Gordon, Minerva King, and Dr. Millicent Brown; and on son, Myles Gregory Brown. Mr. Brown moved back to Charleston where he became a businessman working as a real estate and insurance broker. He became affiliated with the local chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). Brown worked his way to becoming the president of the Charleston chapter of the NAACP in 1955. As president of the local chapter of the NAACP, Mr. Brown led a concerted effort to fight segregation in the public sphere and other issues in the African American civil rights movement. Mr. Brown was also a member on the Voorhees College Board of Trustees, member of the Mu Alpha Chapter of the Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, and a member of the South Carolina Democratic Party. In the 1970’s Mr. Brown was a co-founder and office holder of the Committee on Better Racial Assurance (COBRA).

The “J. Arthur Brown Papers, 1937 – 1989” predominantly consist of correspondence detailing Brown’s work within the Civil Rights movement, largely during his term as President of the NAACP. Additional materials include photographs, pamphlets, and periodicals.

This collection was digitized and made freely available online through the generous support of the National Historical Publications & Records Commission.

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Bernice Robinson Papers, 1920-1989

Bernice Robinson Papers, 1920-1989

The Bernice Robinson Papers, 1920-1989 provide information regarding Robinson's role as a teacher and social activist for voter education, adult literacy, child development, and social work. Contents include biographical papers, writings and talks, correspondence, and affiliations. Biographical papers include transcripts of her oral history interview. Her correspondence includes letters from Guy and Candie Carawan, Andrew Young, Jr., Myles Horton, Septima P. Clark, among others. Robinson accumulated records that document her professional affiliations with organizations such as the Highlander School, Southern Christian Leadership Conference, South Carolina Commission for Farm Workers, Child Development Associate Consortium, Governors Committee on Child Development, Daycare and Child Development Council of America, and the New Readers Press’ “Be Informed” educational pamphlet series, among others. Robinson's political papers include correspondence and campaign materials regarding her candidacy to the South Carolina House of Representatives.

Periodical resources include selections from the “Highlander Reports,” the Wisconsin Office of Economic Opportunity’s newsletter entitled, “OEO,” “Race Relations Reporter,” among others.

Bernice Robinson attended the University of Wisconsin Center for Action on Poverty Technicians Training Program and accumulated a variety of records that pertain to this program. This education led to Robinson’s employment with Volunteers in Service to America (VISTA)–better known today as AmeriCorps Vista–which is heavily documented, providing an insight into this organization’s early operations via job postings, monthly reports, correspondence with subordinates and volunteers, and project proposals.

This collection was digitized and made freely accessible online through the generous support of the National Historical Publications & Records Commission

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Colleton County Memorial Library Bookmobile Collection

Colleton County Memorial Library Bookmobile Collection

The Colleton County Memorial Library has provided bookmobile service since 1937, started by Isabel Patterson Heaton and Elma S. Rogers.  The library continues to provide bookmobile service to rural areas and child care centers throughout the county. This collection features photographs, scrapbooks, newspaper articles from The Press and Standard, and a Library Week guest book.

 

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Gertrude Sanford Legendre Papers, 1836-2000

Gertrude Sanford Legendre Papers, 1836-2000

Gertrude Sanford Legendre (1902–2000) was an American socialite who served as an OSS operative during World War II. She was also a noted explorer, big-game hunter, environmentalist, and owner of Medway plantation in South Carolina.

The collection includes scrapbooks of Gertrude’s travels and family life, loose photographs ranging in date from the mid to late 19th century to the 21st century (including slides, negatives, and multiple other formats), motion picture film, manuscript material including correspondence and business records, and a small amount of published material.
 

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Esau Jenkins Papers, 1963-2003

Esau Jenkins Papers, 1963-2003

Esau Jenkins (1910-1972) was born and raised on Johns Island, South Carolina. With very little formal education, he became a businessman and civil rights leader. Jenkins founded the Progressive Club in 1948, which encouraged local African Americans to register to vote, through the aid of Citizenship Schools, a topic he was educated in by his attendance at Highlander Folk Center in Tennessee. In 1959, he organized the Citizens' Committee of Charleston County dedicated to the economic, cultural and political improvement of local African Americans.

Printed material, correspondence, photographic materials, and literary productions (1963-2003) document the life and works of Esau Jenkins (1910-1972). Writings holds miscellaneous correspondence and notes and printed versions of his talks and writings. Affiliations contains correspondence, brochures, notes, and other data on variety of organizations he helped found or was a member of, including the Progressive Club, Citizen's Committee of Charleston, Community Organization Credit Union, Political Action Committee of Charleston County, Political Awareness League of Charleston County, and the Highlander Folks Center. Topics mentioned include the 1969 Charleston Hospital Worker's strike, and the protested death of a young African American, Robert Brown, killed by a white policeman in 1970.

This collection was digitized and made freely accessible online through the generous support of the National Historical Publications & Records Commission.

 

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Cleveland L. Sellers, Jr. Papers, 1934-2003

Cleveland L. Sellers, Jr. Papers, 1934-2003

Cleveland Sellers, Jr. (born 1944), an African American from Denmark, South Carolina, was a participant and leader of a variety of student, civil rights, leftist, and Pan African movements in the 1960s and 1970s. Sellers alone was indicted and convicted for inciting a riot during the Orangeburg Massacre, in which three students of South Carolina State University died and many others were wounded; Sellers was later pardoned.

The Cleveland L. Sellers, Jr. Papers is comprised of papers relating to the Orangeburg Massacre, February 5-8, 1968. Included in the collection is a poem, a collection of Western Union telegrams, press releases, a fact sheet created by the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, flyers, photographs, and a resolution from the Student Legislative Council of the University of California at Los Angeles demanding that the perpetrators of the violence that took place at Orangeburg be brought to justice. Additionally, the collection reflects Cleveland L. Sellers, Jr.'s role in a variety of student, civil rights, leftist, and Pan African movements in the 1960s and 1970s; other materials documenting his personal, academic, and professional life. Personal correspondence (1960s-1990s) include 1968 letters from jail, with some mentions of Stokely Carmichael (Kwame Ture) and events, legal problems and pardon relating to the Orangeburg Massacre. Materials on the Orangeburg Massacre include photocopies of court papers, Sellers' appeal to the South Carolina Supreme Court (circa 1970) and clippings and responses regarding the event. Affiliations includes Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) papers (1960-1997, bulk 1960s), All African Revolutionary People's Party materials (1972- 1989, bulk 1970s), materials documenting various African countries and movements, organizations involved in Black Power and Pan Africa movements and Civil Rights. School-related organizations include the Student Organization for Black Unity (SOBU), various black student groups from a number of American colleges and universities, with significant data (1969-1971) regarding the founding, organization, and administration of Malcolm X Liberation University. Also included are various drafts of Sellers' dissertation on the Civil Rights movement from 1954-1968. Printed materials include miscellaneous clippings from a variety of sources and newsletters from various organizations, as well as scattered publications. Photographs of Cleveland Sellers and others are also included.

This collection was digitized and made freely accessible online through the generous support of the National Historical Publications & Records Commission.

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Septima P. Clark Papers, ca. 1910-ca. 1990

Septima P. Clark's 1964 black and white passport photo.

This collection contains material relating to the life and work of Septima P. Clark. The biographical papers include tributes, clippings, certificates, awards, family correspondence and transcripts of various oral history interviews in which Clark discusses her parents; husband; growing up and race relations in Charleston, South Carolina; her work in Citizenship Schools; her work at the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, and in the civil rights movement with people like Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Rosa Parks, Stokely Carmichael, Dorothy Cotton, Ella Baker, Jesse Jackson, Andrew Young, Hosea Williams, Ralph David Abernathy and others. There are a few references to the Charleston South Carolina Hospital Worker's strike in 1969. A series on her works includes a photocopy of her autobiography Echo in My Soul, with related papers; various versions of talks and essays on civil rights, race and racism, non-violence, God and religion, American youth, tributes to individuals and other topics.

Her correspondence includes numerous local and state black and white politicians; a partial letter to Ella Gerber regarding Porgy and Bess, a significant series of letters with writer Josephine Carson (Rider), and from Spelman College professor Vincent Harding, with some of his articles. Presidential materials include a photocopy of a Jimmy Carter letter; a letter from Gerald Ford; and an invitation to inauguration of Richard Nixon and Spiro Agnew.

A series documenting her affiliations begins with a her association with Charleston schools, and contains correspondence regarding losing of her job in 1956 as a teacher for being a member of the NAACP; her service (1975-1978) on the Charleston County School Board; and other connections with various educational endeavors. The series also includes papers regarding her association with the Highlander Folk Center; papers regarding her work with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, with material on Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.; papers regarding the Penn Community Center and Clark's relationship with it; publications, program materials and correspondence regarding Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority and local Charleston Chapter, Gamma Xi Omega; materials regarding various women's groups with which she was affiliated; materials regarding various civil rights, African American and political groups and causes for which she worked; a list of grievances regarding the Charleston Hospital Worker's strike, brochures from various African American political campaigns, groups to free jailed African Americans; the US Commission on Civil Rights, State Advisory Committee of SC; Neighborhood Legal Assistance and other similar groups.

Her church papers include materials regarding Old Bethel Methodist Church, Charleston, SC, and other various Methodist groups, and her papers documenting her relationship with arts groups contain a nearly complete script of Sea Island Song by Alice Childress. Other materials documenting Clark's association with social, health care and literary-related agencies include papers regarding the Septima Clark Day Care Center, and papers dealing with the handicapped. Her relationships with various schools cover institutions such as College Seven, University of California-Santa Cruz, Benedict College and Hampton University, including student papers submitted at Hampton regarding Saxon Elementary School, Columbia, SC, and materials documenting unrest at Allen University, Columbia, SC, and at Voorhees College, Denmark, SC. Photographs show Septima Clark, Poinsette and Clark family members, various functions, programs and events participated in by Clark and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, including teaching programs at various spots and the Charleston Hospital Workers' strike.

This collection was digitized and made freely accessible online through the generous support of the National Historical Publications & Records Commission

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