Architectural Drawings

Ansonborough Rehabilitation Project

Ansonborough Rehabilitation Project

In the 1950s many houses in Ansonborough were threatened with ”demolition by neglect,” having stood vacant or fallen into severe disrepair. In order to encourage homebuyers to move into the neighborhood to save these formerly unwanted treasures, Historic Charleston Foundation (HCF) was the first organization in the country to develop the Revolving Fund as a preservation strategy. The initiation of this fund in 1958 enabled HCF to begin the Ansonborough Rehabilitation Project, an extraordinary effort to save a six-block neighborhood bordered by Market, Calhoun, East Bay, and Meeting Streets. Through the Revolving Fund, HCF sought to purchase, stabilize and resell historic properties with protective covenants in Ansonborough where more than 60 structures were rehabilitated over a 12-year period. The accomplishment was hailed nationwide, and other preservation programs across the United States modeled local initiatives on the Charleston program. HCF’s Ansonborough Rehabilitation Project is considered one of the first successful attempts in the country to preserve an entire neighborhood.

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Related collections also include: Ansonborough Rehabilitation Project Photograph Survey
 

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Philip Simmons Collection

Philip Simmons with ironwork

Philip Simmons (1912-2009) was an African American blacksmith and artisan specializing in the craft of ironwork in Charleston, South Carolina. Simmons spent seventy-seven years crafting utilitarian and ornamental ironwork. His work is recognized within the state of South Carolina, nationally, and internationally.  This collection, donated by the Philip Simmons Foundation, holds personal papers with photographs and business related documents from 1977-2007. The bulk of materials feature preparatory graphite drawings (originals and photocopies) of commissioned works and estimates of Simmons' decorative ironwork (1984-2004, and undated).

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