Letter from Sidney Jennings Legendre, September 7, 1942

  • Image 01
    September 7, 1942 Gertie Darling, I got as far as the comma on the seventh and [arrow pointing to the comma] then stopped this letter to do some work that came in marked urgent. It is now the ninth and I have just arrived at the office and immediately took up my typewriter to finish this letter before I have to do something else. Who do you think came in this office yesterday I full of pomp and ceremony. Trowbridge Ellimans brother. He introduced himself and said he had been at the plantation for lu[n]cheon one day when I was not there last winter. He told me that Trow was on the Admirals staff in Charleston and that he was on the Admirals Staff out here. He had just arrived and wanted to know this and that, and obtain transporatatlon to some part of the Navy Yard. I asked him what he meant by being on the Admirals Staff and what capacity they worked in. He told me that Trow was the Moral officer in Charleston. I replied that I thought he had something to do with real estate. "That iswhat he really does but his official title is Moral Officer" he answered. What do you do on the Admirals Staff was my next question. "Well, ah, I really do not know yet, my duties have not been assigned." I thought I was talking to Trow again, they are so alike. He also toldme that Louie Gourd was in the navy as an officer, but I do not know as what[,] as he was not very clear about it. I went to a Lou Ow. [That certainly is not the way [End Page 1] to spell it, but I am certain you will know what I mean. It was given by the supply dept. of the 14th. Naval district, and there were about three hundred people there. We ate off tables ins- tead of off the ground[,] as you and I did at the one Bill Ryle gave. The food was very good, fish cooked in leaves , barbecued pork, chicken cooked in some peculiar way and served with something that looked like spinach[,] but was not. Then there were cubes of a white looking paste that was cocanut pudding and of course yams. I liked it and ate much to much so that my stomach protruded like those pictures of the Bushman that we took in Africa. After lunch a girl did the Hula Hula and she was very good. Had beautiful hands and used them very gracefuly. Unfortunately instead of wearing a grass skirt she wore one made out of some silver looking stuff that was so theatrical that it ruined the effect. I talked to the the women running the affair and complimented her on the attractive way she had arranged the tables. A little while latter she came up and said that the Captain who was supposed to preside had telephoned he could not come and would I take his place. You would have really had a good laugh when I seated myself in the center of the Captains table and looked down the long row of tables that stretched down the center of the room. I was terrfied that I would be called on for a speech, but everyone was too engrossed with their own conversati n to cell on anyone else. Your letter of October 32, No 12 arrived yesterday, and your description of Lesters party was the first news I had that he had given one. I do not see him at all except at the office. There of course we meet every day, but as his house is several [End Page 2] miles from ours hotel and gas is so short we just do not come together. I believe he has been very social, because I hear the other men in the office kioding him about his parties, but I cannot vouch for it. He is doing a wonderful job and all the men like him a great deal. Certainly I do not know anyone that I think is more attractive. Morris and I rarely see any of the men away from the office. You know when two people are together who like one another they rarely look for outside company, I suppose it may be bad[,] but it is so easy to return to our room, have dinner on the porch and thenplay the radio without bothering to talk and make conversation[,] that we have just chosen the easiest way. There was the loveliest music two nights ago. All the old tunes we loved so well. Merry Widow, Chocolate Soldier,Vien, etc. We went asleep with the radio going, it was heaven. I am so glad you have Lucy. She is such an efficent strong person that I know she will be a great help to you. Certainly one servant is all you need[,] because one Jap out here will take care of an entire house, cook, wash, and serve ten people for dinner. I am afraid the old days of ten servants are gone for quite a while and I must say I don't care. There should be enough money in the bank as you get about $12000 in September and as far as I know there has not been a reason for a large expenditure. Besides this I think you will find you have a surplus in the income tax account. There was eighteen thousand there when I left and if the corporation declared $6 you would have about eighty thousand . The tax should not be more than seventy thousand so that would leave you [End Page 3] andexcess of ten thousand. I think if you write to Mr Ericson and get an idea on what your taxes will be and at the same time find out your balance you will be alright. If you need any money please draw it from theGuaranty. I am letting it accumalate there for my income taxes, and I know therewill be some left over. Use it Gertie. That is what it is there for, but treat it as a sort of CID that you can fall back on when you run out of money in your othere accounts. All you have to do is draw a check, because you will remember I arranged that before leaving. I am sorry that you cannot send the turkey because it would have been so good comming from you, however I really do not see how we could eat another thing. The food could not be better and I am as fat as a pig. This morning for breakfast I had two fried eggs, three pancakes, bacon, papaya, pineapple juice, coffee, three pats of butter,totaling abouta pound of the latterand a pitcher of maple syrup over the cakes. Last night I had steak , cauliflower, potatoes, fruit cup and ice cream. Lunch yesterday was chicken a la king mixed with lots of greeen peppers and vegetables, ice tea, cake, butter, bread etc. The Navy eats far better than civilians I am certain. He hardly ever eat at yur hotel now because the food is so much better in the Yard that we have all our meals at the BOQ. We are really getting to be like Mr Foster. This morning the Red Cross called me to find out how to get intouch with a man. Apparently they think our office should know everything because of its name. However we are rapidly correcting this impression and after they go on a few wild Goose chases they will give up their faith in us. [End Page 4] I would have loved to have seen Mr Kittridge. He is such a sweet and wise old man. I can see him how with his eyes running and his face all crinkled up as he laughs. Be probably had some I wonderful stories about Tillman and the plantation. I am certain that you have to be thot old before Sam Geants sleeping on the floor of the office, and the Moncks corner poaches fail to irritate one. Actual life is so easy out here that I am begginning to realize how hard we worked before. All I have to do is be here at eight in the morning, do a more or less routine job. Go out to lunch at twelve, be back at twelve thirty and leave at about five. Not a worry in the world. No one rushes in to say the rice banks h- have broken, or the woods are on fire. That the pumps are broken or the horses have gone lame, and the office work is play besides tracing two year old bills at the plantation and trying to figure out what trust is paying and which one is not. I am afraid that I will be e lazy old man when the war is over, and you will have to continue to be efficent and run everything. You asked if I have beento Wailii andplayed golf. I have neither been there nor played golf since my arrival. We get home at about five thirty, and then I take a swim and have dinner. The hotel stops serving dinner after six thirty so that there is not time for golf besidesue have not the gas to go out there. For the last week I have not even been swimming because of of this wretched cold that makes me feel as low as a worm. Talk about low[,] man came in our office the othere dey from somewhere in the frozen north. He looked as if he had been living on Moose milk and Tundra grass an his life, me there wasn'xt much life in him. I have never seen anyone so happy as he sas to be on thisheavenly [End Page 5] island with its soft climate and wonderful sunshine. I feel so sorry for you in Washinton when I am out here in the most perfect placein the world. The evenings are so peaceful on our lanai. We have xxxxx a drink and then supper. The radio is turned on and as we lie on our beds we get the world news, and thedgenxreally[,] really lovely music. It is never coldand never really hot, and life flows along very pleasantly. If you and I come back here after the war it will be perfect[,] because then we can enjoy it togeth er. Three more men left the office today, gradually it is dwindling down, but I guess Morris and I are so old, and know now how toget pa[p]er clips ffaster than any one else that we will stay for some time. Nancy telephoned Morris yesterday morning and s[a]id she had to remain an bed for six weeks, and that she has almost lost the baby several times. She is at the hospital with a day and a night nurse which I think ispretty expensive. I don't think she gave him [a]ny other news at least he did not tell me about it. Do you remember you told me that Young George Meade had left. Well Capt. Moore the man that we first met in Washington when we went there to apply , the one that had been in the south seas , has also gone away and a suprising number of others. Everyone is so on the move nowadays that it is difficult to keep up with them[,] is'nt it. Good bye darling, I send you all my love and hope everything is agoing well with you. Sidney J. Legendre [End Page 6]
  • Image 01
    September 7, 1942 Gertie Darling, I got as far as the comma on the seventh and [arrow pointing to the comma] then stopped this letter to do some work that came in marked urgent. It is now the ninth and I have just arrived at the office and immediately took up my typewriter to finish this letter before I have to do something else. Who do you think came in this office yesterday I full of pomp and ceremony. Trowbridge Ellimans brother. He introduced himself and said he had been at the plantation for lu[n]cheon one day when I was not there last winter. He told me that Trow was on the Admirals staff in Charleston and that he was on the Admirals Staff out here. He had just arrived and wanted to know this and that, and obtain transporatatlon to some part of the Navy Yard. I asked him what he meant by being on the Admirals Staff and what capacity they worked in. He told me that Trow was the Moral officer in Charleston. I replied that I thought he had something to do with real estate. "That iswhat he really does but his official title is Moral Officer" he answered. What do you do on the Admirals Staff was my next question. "Well, ah, I really do not know yet, my duties have not been assigned." I thought I was talking to Trow again, they are so alike. He also toldme that Louie Gourd was in the navy as an officer, but I do not know as what[,] as he was not very clear about it. I went to a Lou Ow. [That certainly is not the way [End Page 1] to spell it, but I am certain you will know what I mean. It was given by the supply dept. of the 14th. Naval district, and there were about three hundred people there. We ate off tables ins- tead of off the ground[,] as you and I did at the one Bill Ryle gave. The food was very good, fish cooked in leaves , barbecued pork, chicken cooked in some peculiar way and served with something that looked like spinach[,] but was not. Then there were cubes of a white looking paste that was cocanut pudding and of course yams. I liked it and ate much to much so that my stomach protruded like those pictures of the Bushman that we took in Africa. After lunch a girl did the Hula Hula and she was very good. Had beautiful hands and used them very gracefuly. Unfortunately instead of wearing a grass skirt she wore one made out of some silver looking stuff that was so theatrical that it ruined the effect. I talked to the the women running the affair and complimented her on the attractive way she had arranged the tables. A little while latter she came up and said that the Captain who was supposed to preside had telephoned he could not come and would I take his place. You would have really had a good laugh when I seated myself in the center of the Captains table and looked down the long row of tables that stretched down the center of the room. I was terrfied that I would be called on for a speech, but everyone was too engrossed with their own conversati n to cell on anyone else. Your letter of October 32, No 12 arrived yesterday, and your description of Lesters party was the first news I had that he had given one. I do not see him at all except at the office. There of course we meet every day, but as his house is several [End Page 2] miles from ours hotel and gas is so short we just do not come together. I believe he has been very social, because I hear the other men in the office kioding him about his parties, but I cannot vouch for it. He is doing a wonderful job and all the men like him a great deal. Certainly I do not know anyone that I think is more attractive. Morris and I rarely see any of the men away from the office. You know when two people are together who like one another they rarely look for outside company, I suppose it may be bad[,] but it is so easy to return to our room, have dinner on the porch and thenplay the radio without bothering to talk and make conversation[,] that we have just chosen the easiest way. There was the loveliest music two nights ago. All the old tunes we loved so well. Merry Widow, Chocolate Soldier,Vien, etc. We went asleep with the radio going, it was heaven. I am so glad you have Lucy. She is such an efficent strong person that I know she will be a great help to you. Certainly one servant is all you need[,] because one Jap out here will take care of an entire house, cook, wash, and serve ten people for dinner. I am afraid the old days of ten servants are gone for quite a while and I must say I don't care. There should be enough money in the bank as you get about $12000 in September and as far as I know there has not been a reason for a large expenditure. Besides this I think you will find you have a surplus in the income tax account. There was eighteen thousand there when I left and if the corporation declared $6 you would have about eighty thousand . The tax should not be more than seventy thousand so that would leave you [End Page 3] andexcess of ten thousand. I think if you write to Mr Ericson and get an idea on what your taxes will be and at the same time find out your balance you will be alright. If you need any money please draw it from theGuaranty. I am letting it accumalate there for my income taxes, and I know therewill be some left over. Use it Gertie. That is what it is there for, but treat it as a sort of CID that you can fall back on when you run out of money in your othere accounts. All you have to do is draw a check, because you will remember I arranged that before leaving. I am sorry that you cannot send the turkey because it would have been so good comming from you, however I really do not see how we could eat another thing. The food could not be better and I am as fat as a pig. This morning for breakfast I had two fried eggs, three pancakes, bacon, papaya, pineapple juice, coffee, three pats of butter,totaling abouta pound of the latterand a pitcher of maple syrup over the cakes. Last night I had steak , cauliflower, potatoes, fruit cup and ice cream. Lunch yesterday was chicken a la king mixed with lots of greeen peppers and vegetables, ice tea, cake, butter, bread etc. The Navy eats far better than civilians I am certain. He hardly ever eat at yur hotel now because the food is so much better in the Yard that we have all our meals at the BOQ. We are really getting to be like Mr Foster. This morning the Red Cross called me to find out how to get intouch with a man. Apparently they think our office should know everything because of its name. However we are rapidly correcting this impression and after they go on a few wild Goose chases they will give up their faith in us. [End Page 4] I would have loved to have seen Mr Kittridge. He is such a sweet and wise old man. I can see him how with his eyes running and his face all crinkled up as he laughs. Be probably had some I wonderful stories about Tillman and the plantation. I am certain that you have to be thot old before Sam Geants sleeping on the floor of the office, and the Moncks corner poaches fail to irritate one. Actual life is so easy out here that I am begginning to realize how hard we worked before. All I have to do is be here at eight in the morning, do a more or less routine job. Go out to lunch at twelve, be back at twelve thirty and leave at about five. Not a worry in the world. No one rushes in to say the rice banks h- have broken, or the woods are on fire. That the pumps are broken or the horses have gone lame, and the office work is play besides tracing two year old bills at the plantation and trying to figure out what trust is paying and which one is not. I am afraid that I will be e lazy old man when the war is over, and you will have to continue to be efficent and run everything. You asked if I have beento Wailii andplayed golf. I have neither been there nor played golf since my arrival. We get home at about five thirty, and then I take a swim and have dinner. The hotel stops serving dinner after six thirty so that there is not time for golf besidesue have not the gas to go out there. For the last week I have not even been swimming because of of this wretched cold that makes me feel as low as a worm. Talk about low[,] man came in our office the othere dey from somewhere in the frozen north. He looked as if he had been living on Moose milk and Tundra grass an his life, me there wasn'xt much life in him. I have never seen anyone so happy as he sas to be on thisheavenly [End Page 5] island with its soft climate and wonderful sunshine. I feel so sorry for you in Washinton when I am out here in the most perfect placein the world. The evenings are so peaceful on our lanai. We have xxxxx a drink and then supper. The radio is turned on and as we lie on our beds we get the world news, and thedgenxreally[,] really lovely music. It is never coldand never really hot, and life flows along very pleasantly. If you and I come back here after the war it will be perfect[,] because then we can enjoy it togeth er. Three more men left the office today, gradually it is dwindling down, but I guess Morris and I are so old, and know now how toget pa[p]er clips ffaster than any one else that we will stay for some time. Nancy telephoned Morris yesterday morning and s[a]id she had to remain an bed for six weeks, and that she has almost lost the baby several times. She is at the hospital with a day and a night nurse which I think ispretty expensive. I don't think she gave him [a]ny other news at least he did not tell me about it. Do you remember you told me that Young George Meade had left. Well Capt. Moore the man that we first met in Washington when we went there to apply , the one that had been in the south seas , has also gone away and a suprising number of others. Everyone is so on the move nowadays that it is difficult to keep up with them[,] is'nt it. Good bye darling, I send you all my love and hope everything is agoing well with you. Sidney J. Legendre [End Page 6]
  • Image 01
    September 7, 1942 Gertie Darling, I got as far as the comma on the seventh and [arrow pointing to the comma] then stopped this letter to do some work that came in marked urgent. It is now the ninth and I have just arrived at the office and immediately took up my typewriter to finish this letter before I have to do something else. Who do you think came in this office yesterday I full of pomp and ceremony. Trowbridge Ellimans brother. He introduced himself and said he had been at the plantation for lu[n]cheon one day when I was not there last winter. He told me that Trow was on the Admirals staff in Charleston and that he was on the Admirals Staff out here. He had just arrived and wanted to know this and that, and obtain transporatatlon to some part of the Navy Yard. I asked him what he meant by being on the Admirals Staff and what capacity they worked in. He told me that Trow was the Moral officer in Charleston. I replied that I thought he had something to do with real estate. "That iswhat he really does but his official title is Moral Officer" he answered. What do you do on the Admirals Staff was my next question. "Well, ah, I really do not know yet, my duties have not been assigned." I thought I was talking to Trow again, they are so alike. He also toldme that Louie Gourd was in the navy as an officer, but I do not know as what[,] as he was not very clear about it. I went to a Lou Ow. [That certainly is not the way [End Page 1] to spell it, but I am certain you will know what I mean. It was given by the supply dept. of the 14th. Naval district, and there were about three hundred people there. We ate off tables ins- tead of off the ground[,] as you and I did at the one Bill Ryle gave. The food was very good, fish cooked in leaves , barbecued pork, chicken cooked in some peculiar way and served with something that looked like spinach[,] but was not. Then there were cubes of a white looking paste that was cocanut pudding and of course yams. I liked it and ate much to much so that my stomach protruded like those pictures of the Bushman that we took in Africa. After lunch a girl did the Hula Hula and she was very good. Had beautiful hands and used them very gracefuly. Unfortunately instead of wearing a grass skirt she wore one made out of some silver looking stuff that was so theatrical that it ruined the effect. I talked to the the women running the affair and complimented her on the attractive way she had arranged the tables. A little while latter she came up and said that the Captain who was supposed to preside had telephoned he could not come and would I take his place. You would have really had a good laugh when I seated myself in the center of the Captains table and looked down the long row of tables that stretched down the center of the room. I was terrfied that I would be called on for a speech, but everyone was too engrossed with their own conversati n to cell on anyone else. Your letter of October 32, No 12 arrived yesterday, and your description of Lesters party was the first news I had that he had given one. I do not see him at all except at the office. There of course we meet every day, but as his house is several [End Page 2] miles from ours hotel and gas is so short we just do not come together. I believe he has been very social, because I hear the other men in the office kioding him about his parties, but I cannot vouch for it. He is doing a wonderful job and all the men like him a great deal. Certainly I do not know anyone that I think is more attractive. Morris and I rarely see any of the men away from the office. You know when two people are together who like one another they rarely look for outside company, I suppose it may be bad[,] but it is so easy to return to our room, have dinner on the porch and thenplay the radio without bothering to talk and make conversation[,] that we have just chosen the easiest way. There was the loveliest music two nights ago. All the old tunes we loved so well. Merry Widow, Chocolate Soldier,Vien, etc. We went asleep with the radio going, it was heaven. I am so glad you have Lucy. She is such an efficent strong person that I know she will be a great help to you. Certainly one servant is all you need[,] because one Jap out here will take care of an entire house, cook, wash, and serve ten people for dinner. I am afraid the old days of ten servants are gone for quite a while and I must say I don't care. There should be enough money in the bank as you get about $12000 in September and as far as I know there has not been a reason for a large expenditure. Besides this I think you will find you have a surplus in the income tax account. There was eighteen thousand there when I left and if the corporation declared $6 you would have about eighty thousand . The tax should not be more than seventy thousand so that would leave you [End Page 3] andexcess of ten thousand. I think if you write to Mr Ericson and get an idea on what your taxes will be and at the same time find out your balance you will be alright. If you need any money please draw it from theGuaranty. I am letting it accumalate there for my income taxes, and I know therewill be some left over. Use it Gertie. That is what it is there for, but treat it as a sort of CID that you can fall back on when you run out of money in your othere accounts. All you have to do is draw a check, because you will remember I arranged that before leaving. I am sorry that you cannot send the turkey because it would have been so good comming from you, however I really do not see how we could eat another thing. The food could not be better and I am as fat as a pig. This morning for breakfast I had two fried eggs, three pancakes, bacon, papaya, pineapple juice, coffee, three pats of butter,totaling abouta pound of the latterand a pitcher of maple syrup over the cakes. Last night I had steak , cauliflower, potatoes, fruit cup and ice cream. Lunch yesterday was chicken a la king mixed with lots of greeen peppers and vegetables, ice tea, cake, butter, bread etc. The Navy eats far better than civilians I am certain. He hardly ever eat at yur hotel now because the food is so much better in the Yard that we have all our meals at the BOQ. We are really getting to be like Mr Foster. This morning the Red Cross called me to find out how to get intouch with a man. Apparently they think our office should know everything because of its name. However we are rapidly correcting this impression and after they go on a few wild Goose chases they will give up their faith in us. [End Page 4] I would have loved to have seen Mr Kittridge. He is such a sweet and wise old man. I can see him how with his eyes running and his face all crinkled up as he laughs. Be probably had some I wonderful stories about Tillman and the plantation. I am certain that you have to be thot old before Sam Geants sleeping on the floor of the office, and the Moncks corner poaches fail to irritate one. Actual life is so easy out here that I am begginning to realize how hard we worked before. All I have to do is be here at eight in the morning, do a more or less routine job. Go out to lunch at twelve, be back at twelve thirty and leave at about five. Not a worry in the world. No one rushes in to say the rice banks h- have broken, or the woods are on fire. That the pumps are broken or the horses have gone lame, and the office work is play besides tracing two year old bills at the plantation and trying to figure out what trust is paying and which one is not. I am afraid that I will be e lazy old man when the war is over, and you will have to continue to be efficent and run everything. You asked if I have beento Wailii andplayed golf. I have neither been there nor played golf since my arrival. We get home at about five thirty, and then I take a swim and have dinner. The hotel stops serving dinner after six thirty so that there is not time for golf besidesue have not the gas to go out there. For the last week I have not even been swimming because of of this wretched cold that makes me feel as low as a worm. Talk about low[,] man came in our office the othere dey from somewhere in the frozen north. He looked as if he had been living on Moose milk and Tundra grass an his life, me there wasn'xt much life in him. I have never seen anyone so happy as he sas to be on thisheavenly [End Page 5] island with its soft climate and wonderful sunshine. I feel so sorry for you in Washinton when I am out here in the most perfect placein the world. The evenings are so peaceful on our lanai. We have xxxxx a drink and then supper. The radio is turned on and as we lie on our beds we get the world news, and thedgenxreally[,] really lovely music. It is never coldand never really hot, and life flows along very pleasantly. If you and I come back here after the war it will be perfect[,] because then we can enjoy it togeth er. Three more men left the office today, gradually it is dwindling down, but I guess Morris and I are so old, and know now how toget pa[p]er clips ffaster than any one else that we will stay for some time. Nancy telephoned Morris yesterday morning and s[a]id she had to remain an bed for six weeks, and that she has almost lost the baby several times. She is at the hospital with a day and a night nurse which I think ispretty expensive. I don't think she gave him [a]ny other news at least he did not tell me about it. Do you remember you told me that Young George Meade had left. Well Capt. Moore the man that we first met in Washington when we went there to apply , the one that had been in the south seas , has also gone away and a suprising number of others. Everyone is so on the move nowadays that it is difficult to keep up with them[,] is'nt it. Good bye darling, I send you all my love and hope everything is agoing well with you. Sidney J. Legendre [End Page 6]
  • Image 01
    September 7, 1942 Gertie Darling, I got as far as the comma on the seventh and [arrow pointing to the comma] then stopped this letter to do some work that came in marked urgent. It is now the ninth and I have just arrived at the office and immediately took up my typewriter to finish this letter before I have to do something else. Who do you think came in this office yesterday I full of pomp and ceremony. Trowbridge Ellimans brother. He introduced himself and said he had been at the plantation for lu[n]cheon one day when I was not there last winter. He told me that Trow was on the Admirals staff in Charleston and that he was on the Admirals Staff out here. He had just arrived and wanted to know this and that, and obtain transporatatlon to some part of the Navy Yard. I asked him what he meant by being on the Admirals Staff and what capacity they worked in. He told me that Trow was the Moral officer in Charleston. I replied that I thought he had something to do with real estate. "That iswhat he really does but his official title is Moral Officer" he answered. What do you do on the Admirals Staff was my next question. "Well, ah, I really do not know yet, my duties have not been assigned." I thought I was talking to Trow again, they are so alike. He also toldme that Louie Gourd was in the navy as an officer, but I do not know as what[,] as he was not very clear about it. I went to a Lou Ow. [That certainly is not the way [End Page 1] to spell it, but I am certain you will know what I mean. It was given by the supply dept. of the 14th. Naval district, and there were about three hundred people there. We ate off tables ins- tead of off the ground[,] as you and I did at the one Bill Ryle gave. The food was very good, fish cooked in leaves , barbecued pork, chicken cooked in some peculiar way and served with something that looked like spinach[,] but was not. Then there were cubes of a white looking paste that was cocanut pudding and of course yams. I liked it and ate much to much so that my stomach protruded like those pictures of the Bushman that we took in Africa. After lunch a girl did the Hula Hula and she was very good. Had beautiful hands and used them very gracefuly. Unfortunately instead of wearing a grass skirt she wore one made out of some silver looking stuff that was so theatrical that it ruined the effect. I talked to the the women running the affair and complimented her on the attractive way she had arranged the tables. A little while latter she came up and said that the Captain who was supposed to preside had telephoned he could not come and would I take his place. You would have really had a good laugh when I seated myself in the center of the Captains table and looked down the long row of tables that stretched down the center of the room. I was terrfied that I would be called on for a speech, but everyone was too engrossed with their own conversati n to cell on anyone else. Your letter of October 32, No 12 arrived yesterday, and your description of Lesters party was the first news I had that he had given one. I do not see him at all except at the office. There of course we meet every day, but as his house is several [End Page 2] miles from ours hotel and gas is so short we just do not come together. I believe he has been very social, because I hear the other men in the office kioding him about his parties, but I cannot vouch for it. He is doing a wonderful job and all the men like him a great deal. Certainly I do not know anyone that I think is more attractive. Morris and I rarely see any of the men away from the office. You know when two people are together who like one another they rarely look for outside company, I suppose it may be bad[,] but it is so easy to return to our room, have dinner on the porch and thenplay the radio without bothering to talk and make conversation[,] that we have just chosen the easiest way. There was the loveliest music two nights ago. All the old tunes we loved so well. Merry Widow, Chocolate Soldier,Vien, etc. We went asleep with the radio going, it was heaven. I am so glad you have Lucy. She is such an efficent strong person that I know she will be a great help to you. Certainly one servant is all you need[,] because one Jap out here will take care of an entire house, cook, wash, and serve ten people for dinner. I am afraid the old days of ten servants are gone for quite a while and I must say I don't care. There should be enough money in the bank as you get about $12000 in September and as far as I know there has not been a reason for a large expenditure. Besides this I think you will find you have a surplus in the income tax account. There was eighteen thousand there when I left and if the corporation declared $6 you would have about eighty thousand . The tax should not be more than seventy thousand so that would leave you [End Page 3] andexcess of ten thousand. I think if you write to Mr Ericson and get an idea on what your taxes will be and at the same time find out your balance you will be alright. If you need any money please draw it from theGuaranty. I am letting it accumalate there for my income taxes, and I know therewill be some left over. Use it Gertie. That is what it is there for, but treat it as a sort of CID that you can fall back on when you run out of money in your othere accounts. All you have to do is draw a check, because you will remember I arranged that before leaving. I am sorry that you cannot send the turkey because it would have been so good comming from you, however I really do not see how we could eat another thing. The food could not be better and I am as fat as a pig. This morning for breakfast I had two fried eggs, three pancakes, bacon, papaya, pineapple juice, coffee, three pats of butter,totaling abouta pound of the latterand a pitcher of maple syrup over the cakes. Last night I had steak , cauliflower, potatoes, fruit cup and ice cream. Lunch yesterday was chicken a la king mixed with lots of greeen peppers and vegetables, ice tea, cake, butter, bread etc. The Navy eats far better than civilians I am certain. He hardly ever eat at yur hotel now because the food is so much better in the Yard that we have all our meals at the BOQ. We are really getting to be like Mr Foster. This morning the Red Cross called me to find out how to get intouch with a man. Apparently they think our office should know everything because of its name. However we are rapidly correcting this impression and after they go on a few wild Goose chases they will give up their faith in us. [End Page 4] I would have loved to have seen Mr Kittridge. He is such a sweet and wise old man. I can see him how with his eyes running and his face all crinkled up as he laughs. Be probably had some I wonderful stories about Tillman and the plantation. I am certain that you have to be thot old before Sam Geants sleeping on the floor of the office, and the Moncks corner poaches fail to irritate one. Actual life is so easy out here that I am begginning to realize how hard we worked before. All I have to do is be here at eight in the morning, do a more or less routine job. Go out to lunch at twelve, be back at twelve thirty and leave at about five. Not a worry in the world. No one rushes in to say the rice banks h- have broken, or the woods are on fire. That the pumps are broken or the horses have gone lame, and the office work is play besides tracing two year old bills at the plantation and trying to figure out what trust is paying and which one is not. I am afraid that I will be e lazy old man when the war is over, and you will have to continue to be efficent and run everything. You asked if I have beento Wailii andplayed golf. I have neither been there nor played golf since my arrival. We get home at about five thirty, and then I take a swim and have dinner. The hotel stops serving dinner after six thirty so that there is not time for golf besidesue have not the gas to go out there. For the last week I have not even been swimming because of of this wretched cold that makes me feel as low as a worm. Talk about low[,] man came in our office the othere dey from somewhere in the frozen north. He looked as if he had been living on Moose milk and Tundra grass an his life, me there wasn'xt much life in him. I have never seen anyone so happy as he sas to be on thisheavenly [End Page 5] island with its soft climate and wonderful sunshine. I feel so sorry for you in Washinton when I am out here in the most perfect placein the world. The evenings are so peaceful on our lanai. We have xxxxx a drink and then supper. The radio is turned on and as we lie on our beds we get the world news, and thedgenxreally[,] really lovely music. It is never coldand never really hot, and life flows along very pleasantly. If you and I come back here after the war it will be perfect[,] because then we can enjoy it togeth er. Three more men left the office today, gradually it is dwindling down, but I guess Morris and I are so old, and know now how toget pa[p]er clips ffaster than any one else that we will stay for some time. Nancy telephoned Morris yesterday morning and s[a]id she had to remain an bed for six weeks, and that she has almost lost the baby several times. She is at the hospital with a day and a night nurse which I think ispretty expensive. I don't think she gave him [a]ny other news at least he did not tell me about it. Do you remember you told me that Young George Meade had left. Well Capt. Moore the man that we first met in Washington when we went there to apply , the one that had been in the south seas , has also gone away and a suprising number of others. Everyone is so on the move nowadays that it is difficult to keep up with them[,] is'nt it. Good bye darling, I send you all my love and hope everything is agoing well with you. Sidney J. Legendre [End Page 6]
  • Image 01
    September 7, 1942 Gertie Darling, I got as far as the comma on the seventh and [arrow pointing to the comma] then stopped this letter to do some work that came in marked urgent. It is now the ninth and I have just arrived at the office and immediately took up my typewriter to finish this letter before I have to do something else. Who do you think came in this office yesterday I full of pomp and ceremony. Trowbridge Ellimans brother. He introduced himself and said he had been at the plantation for lu[n]cheon one day when I was not there last winter. He told me that Trow was on the Admirals staff in Charleston and that he was on the Admirals Staff out here. He had just arrived and wanted to know this and that, and obtain transporatatlon to some part of the Navy Yard. I asked him what he meant by being on the Admirals Staff and what capacity they worked in. He told me that Trow was the Moral officer in Charleston. I replied that I thought he had something to do with real estate. "That iswhat he really does but his official title is Moral Officer" he answered. What do you do on the Admirals Staff was my next question. "Well, ah, I really do not know yet, my duties have not been assigned." I thought I was talking to Trow again, they are so alike. He also toldme that Louie Gourd was in the navy as an officer, but I do not know as what[,] as he was not very clear about it. I went to a Lou Ow. [That certainly is not the way [End Page 1] to spell it, but I am certain you will know what I mean. It was given by the supply dept. of the 14th. Naval district, and there were about three hundred people there. We ate off tables ins- tead of off the ground[,] as you and I did at the one Bill Ryle gave. The food was very good, fish cooked in leaves , barbecued pork, chicken cooked in some peculiar way and served with something that looked like spinach[,] but was not. Then there were cubes of a white looking paste that was cocanut pudding and of course yams. I liked it and ate much to much so that my stomach protruded like those pictures of the Bushman that we took in Africa. After lunch a girl did the Hula Hula and she was very good. Had beautiful hands and used them very gracefuly. Unfortunately instead of wearing a grass skirt she wore one made out of some silver looking stuff that was so theatrical that it ruined the effect. I talked to the the women running the affair and complimented her on the attractive way she had arranged the tables. A little while latter she came up and said that the Captain who was supposed to preside had telephoned he could not come and would I take his place. You would have really had a good laugh when I seated myself in the center of the Captains table and looked down the long row of tables that stretched down the center of the room. I was terrfied that I would be called on for a speech, but everyone was too engrossed with their own conversati n to cell on anyone else. Your letter of October 32, No 12 arrived yesterday, and your description of Lesters party was the first news I had that he had given one. I do not see him at all except at the office. There of course we meet every day, but as his house is several [End Page 2] miles from ours hotel and gas is so short we just do not come together. I believe he has been very social, because I hear the other men in the office kioding him about his parties, but I cannot vouch for it. He is doing a wonderful job and all the men like him a great deal. Certainly I do not know anyone that I think is more attractive. Morris and I rarely see any of the men away from the office. You know when two people are together who like one another they rarely look for outside company, I suppose it may be bad[,] but it is so easy to return to our room, have dinner on the porch and thenplay the radio without bothering to talk and make conversation[,] that we have just chosen the easiest way. There was the loveliest music two nights ago. All the old tunes we loved so well. Merry Widow, Chocolate Soldier,Vien, etc. We went asleep with the radio going, it was heaven. I am so glad you have Lucy. She is such an efficent strong person that I know she will be a great help to you. Certainly one servant is all you need[,] because one Jap out here will take care of an entire house, cook, wash, and serve ten people for dinner. I am afraid the old days of ten servants are gone for quite a while and I must say I don't care. There should be enough money in the bank as you get about $12000 in September and as far as I know there has not been a reason for a large expenditure. Besides this I think you will find you have a surplus in the income tax account. There was eighteen thousand there when I left and if the corporation declared $6 you would have about eighty thousand . The tax should not be more than seventy thousand so that would leave you [End Page 3] andexcess of ten thousand. I think if you write to Mr Ericson and get an idea on what your taxes will be and at the same time find out your balance you will be alright. If you need any money please draw it from theGuaranty. I am letting it accumalate there for my income taxes, and I know therewill be some left over. Use it Gertie. That is what it is there for, but treat it as a sort of CID that you can fall back on when you run out of money in your othere accounts. All you have to do is draw a check, because you will remember I arranged that before leaving. I am sorry that you cannot send the turkey because it would have been so good comming from you, however I really do not see how we could eat another thing. The food could not be better and I am as fat as a pig. This morning for breakfast I had two fried eggs, three pancakes, bacon, papaya, pineapple juice, coffee, three pats of butter,totaling abouta pound of the latterand a pitcher of maple syrup over the cakes. Last night I had steak , cauliflower, potatoes, fruit cup and ice cream. Lunch yesterday was chicken a la king mixed with lots of greeen peppers and vegetables, ice tea, cake, butter, bread etc. The Navy eats far better than civilians I am certain. He hardly ever eat at yur hotel now because the food is so much better in the Yard that we have all our meals at the BOQ. We are really getting to be like Mr Foster. This morning the Red Cross called me to find out how to get intouch with a man. Apparently they think our office should know everything because of its name. However we are rapidly correcting this impression and after they go on a few wild Goose chases they will give up their faith in us. [End Page 4] I would have loved to have seen Mr Kittridge. He is such a sweet and wise old man. I can see him how with his eyes running and his face all crinkled up as he laughs. Be probably had some I wonderful stories about Tillman and the plantation. I am certain that you have to be thot old before Sam Geants sleeping on the floor of the office, and the Moncks corner poaches fail to irritate one. Actual life is so easy out here that I am begginning to realize how hard we worked before. All I have to do is be here at eight in the morning, do a more or less routine job. Go out to lunch at twelve, be back at twelve thirty and leave at about five. Not a worry in the world. No one rushes in to say the rice banks h- have broken, or the woods are on fire. That the pumps are broken or the horses have gone lame, and the office work is play besides tracing two year old bills at the plantation and trying to figure out what trust is paying and which one is not. I am afraid that I will be e lazy old man when the war is over, and you will have to continue to be efficent and run everything. You asked if I have beento Wailii andplayed golf. I have neither been there nor played golf since my arrival. We get home at about five thirty, and then I take a swim and have dinner. The hotel stops serving dinner after six thirty so that there is not time for golf besidesue have not the gas to go out there. For the last week I have not even been swimming because of of this wretched cold that makes me feel as low as a worm. Talk about low[,] man came in our office the othere dey from somewhere in the frozen north. He looked as if he had been living on Moose milk and Tundra grass an his life, me there wasn'xt much life in him. I have never seen anyone so happy as he sas to be on thisheavenly [End Page 5] island with its soft climate and wonderful sunshine. I feel so sorry for you in Washinton when I am out here in the most perfect placein the world. The evenings are so peaceful on our lanai. We have xxxxx a drink and then supper. The radio is turned on and as we lie on our beds we get the world news, and thedgenxreally[,] really lovely music. It is never coldand never really hot, and life flows along very pleasantly. If you and I come back here after the war it will be perfect[,] because then we can enjoy it togeth er. Three more men left the office today, gradually it is dwindling down, but I guess Morris and I are so old, and know now how toget pa[p]er clips ffaster than any one else that we will stay for some time. Nancy telephoned Morris yesterday morning and s[a]id she had to remain an bed for six weeks, and that she has almost lost the baby several times. She is at the hospital with a day and a night nurse which I think ispretty expensive. I don't think she gave him [a]ny other news at least he did not tell me about it. Do you remember you told me that Young George Meade had left. Well Capt. Moore the man that we first met in Washington when we went there to apply , the one that had been in the south seas , has also gone away and a suprising number of others. Everyone is so on the move nowadays that it is difficult to keep up with them[,] is'nt it. Good bye darling, I send you all my love and hope everything is agoing well with you. Sidney J. Legendre [End Page 6]
  • Image 01
    September 7, 1942 Gertie Darling, I got as far as the comma on the seventh and [arrow pointing to the comma] then stopped this letter to do some work that came in marked urgent. It is now the ninth and I have just arrived at the office and immediately took up my typewriter to finish this letter before I have to do something else. Who do you think came in this office yesterday I full of pomp and ceremony. Trowbridge Ellimans brother. He introduced himself and said he had been at the plantation for lu[n]cheon one day when I was not there last winter. He told me that Trow was on the Admirals staff in Charleston and that he was on the Admirals Staff out here. He had just arrived and wanted to know this and that, and obtain transporatatlon to some part of the Navy Yard. I asked him what he meant by being on the Admirals Staff and what capacity they worked in. He told me that Trow was the Moral officer in Charleston. I replied that I thought he had something to do with real estate. "That iswhat he really does but his official title is Moral Officer" he answered. What do you do on the Admirals Staff was my next question. "Well, ah, I really do not know yet, my duties have not been assigned." I thought I was talking to Trow again, they are so alike. He also toldme that Louie Gourd was in the navy as an officer, but I do not know as what[,] as he was not very clear about it. I went to a Lou Ow. [That certainly is not the way [End Page 1] to spell it, but I am certain you will know what I mean. It was given by the supply dept. of the 14th. Naval district, and there were about three hundred people there. We ate off tables ins- tead of off the ground[,] as you and I did at the one Bill Ryle gave. The food was very good, fish cooked in leaves , barbecued pork, chicken cooked in some peculiar way and served with something that looked like spinach[,] but was not. Then there were cubes of a white looking paste that was cocanut pudding and of course yams. I liked it and ate much to much so that my stomach protruded like those pictures of the Bushman that we took in Africa. After lunch a girl did the Hula Hula and she was very good. Had beautiful hands and used them very gracefuly. Unfortunately instead of wearing a grass skirt she wore one made out of some silver looking stuff that was so theatrical that it ruined the effect. I talked to the the women running the affair and complimented her on the attractive way she had arranged the tables. A little while latter she came up and said that the Captain who was supposed to preside had telephoned he could not come and would I take his place. You would have really had a good laugh when I seated myself in the center of the Captains table and looked down the long row of tables that stretched down the center of the room. I was terrfied that I would be called on for a speech, but everyone was too engrossed with their own conversati n to cell on anyone else. Your letter of October 32, No 12 arrived yesterday, and your description of Lesters party was the first news I had that he had given one. I do not see him at all except at the office. There of course we meet every day, but as his house is several [End Page 2] miles from ours hotel and gas is so short we just do not come together. I believe he has been very social, because I hear the other men in the office kioding him about his parties, but I cannot vouch for it. He is doing a wonderful job and all the men like him a great deal. Certainly I do not know anyone that I think is more attractive. Morris and I rarely see any of the men away from the office. You know when two people are together who like one another they rarely look for outside company, I suppose it may be bad[,] but it is so easy to return to our room, have dinner on the porch and thenplay the radio without bothering to talk and make conversation[,] that we have just chosen the easiest way. There was the loveliest music two nights ago. All the old tunes we loved so well. Merry Widow, Chocolate Soldier,Vien, etc. We went asleep with the radio going, it was heaven. I am so glad you have Lucy. She is such an efficent strong person that I know she will be a great help to you. Certainly one servant is all you need[,] because one Jap out here will take care of an entire house, cook, wash, and serve ten people for dinner. I am afraid the old days of ten servants are gone for quite a while and I must say I don't care. There should be enough money in the bank as you get about $12000 in September and as far as I know there has not been a reason for a large expenditure. Besides this I think you will find you have a surplus in the income tax account. There was eighteen thousand there when I left and if the corporation declared $6 you would have about eighty thousand . The tax should not be more than seventy thousand so that would leave you [End Page 3] andexcess of ten thousand. I think if you write to Mr Ericson and get an idea on what your taxes will be and at the same time find out your balance you will be alright. If you need any money please draw it from theGuaranty. I am letting it accumalate there for my income taxes, and I know therewill be some left over. Use it Gertie. That is what it is there for, but treat it as a sort of CID that you can fall back on when you run out of money in your othere accounts. All you have to do is draw a check, because you will remember I arranged that before leaving. I am sorry that you cannot send the turkey because it would have been so good comming from you, however I really do not see how we could eat another thing. The food could not be better and I am as fat as a pig. This morning for breakfast I had two fried eggs, three pancakes, bacon, papaya, pineapple juice, coffee, three pats of butter,totaling abouta pound of the latterand a pitcher of maple syrup over the cakes. Last night I had steak , cauliflower, potatoes, fruit cup and ice cream. Lunch yesterday was chicken a la king mixed with lots of greeen peppers and vegetables, ice tea, cake, butter, bread etc. The Navy eats far better than civilians I am certain. He hardly ever eat at yur hotel now because the food is so much better in the Yard that we have all our meals at the BOQ. We are really getting to be like Mr Foster. This morning the Red Cross called me to find out how to get intouch with a man. Apparently they think our office should know everything because of its name. However we are rapidly correcting this impression and after they go on a few wild Goose chases they will give up their faith in us. [End Page 4] I would have loved to have seen Mr Kittridge. He is such a sweet and wise old man. I can see him how with his eyes running and his face all crinkled up as he laughs. Be probably had some I wonderful stories about Tillman and the plantation. I am certain that you have to be thot old before Sam Geants sleeping on the floor of the office, and the Moncks corner poaches fail to irritate one. Actual life is so easy out here that I am begginning to realize how hard we worked before. All I have to do is be here at eight in the morning, do a more or less routine job. Go out to lunch at twelve, be back at twelve thirty and leave at about five. Not a worry in the world. No one rushes in to say the rice banks h- have broken, or the woods are on fire. That the pumps are broken or the horses have gone lame, and the office work is play besides tracing two year old bills at the plantation and trying to figure out what trust is paying and which one is not. I am afraid that I will be e lazy old man when the war is over, and you will have to continue to be efficent and run everything. You asked if I have beento Wailii andplayed golf. I have neither been there nor played golf since my arrival. We get home at about five thirty, and then I take a swim and have dinner. The hotel stops serving dinner after six thirty so that there is not time for golf besidesue have not the gas to go out there. For the last week I have not even been swimming because of of this wretched cold that makes me feel as low as a worm. Talk about low[,] man came in our office the othere dey from somewhere in the frozen north. He looked as if he had been living on Moose milk and Tundra grass an his life, me there wasn'xt much life in him. I have never seen anyone so happy as he sas to be on thisheavenly [End Page 5] island with its soft climate and wonderful sunshine. I feel so sorry for you in Washinton when I am out here in the most perfect placein the world. The evenings are so peaceful on our lanai. We have xxxxx a drink and then supper. The radio is turned on and as we lie on our beds we get the world news, and thedgenxreally[,] really lovely music. It is never coldand never really hot, and life flows along very pleasantly. If you and I come back here after the war it will be perfect[,] because then we can enjoy it togeth er. Three more men left the office today, gradually it is dwindling down, but I guess Morris and I are so old, and know now how toget pa[p]er clips ffaster than any one else that we will stay for some time. Nancy telephoned Morris yesterday morning and s[a]id she had to remain an bed for six weeks, and that she has almost lost the baby several times. She is at the hospital with a day and a night nurse which I think ispretty expensive. I don't think she gave him [a]ny other news at least he did not tell me about it. Do you remember you told me that Young George Meade had left. Well Capt. Moore the man that we first met in Washington when we went there to apply , the one that had been in the south seas , has also gone away and a suprising number of others. Everyone is so on the move nowadays that it is difficult to keep up with them[,] is'nt it. Good bye darling, I send you all my love and hope everything is agoing well with you. Sidney J. Legendre [End Page 6]
Title:
Letter from Sidney Jennings Legendre, September 7, 1942
Creator:
Legendre, Sidney Jennings, 1903-1948
Date:
1942-09-07
Description:
Letter from Sidney Legendre to his wife, Gertrude Legendre, informing her of an acquaintance he had made on the Admiral’s staff, describing a luau he had attended, and explaining his reluctance to be social as he is happy to just spend time with his brother. Sidney continues in his letter to discuss their business affairs, the lack of food shortage in Hawaii, and lamenting that he may be an old man before the war is over. He also describes the bliss of being away from the woes of Medway Plantation, his love of the island, and delivers the most recent news of Morris’s pregnant wife, Nancy.
Collection:
Gertrude Sanford Legendre Papers, 1844-1996
Contributing Institution:
College of Charleston Libraries
Media Type:
Manuscripts
Personal or Corporate Subject:
Legendre, Sidney Jennings, 1903-1948, Legendre, Gertrude Sanford, 1902-2000
Topical Subject:
World War, 1939-1945
Geographic Subject:
Washington (D.C.)
Language:
English
Series:
Gertrude Sanford Legendre Papers: Correspondence
Shelving Locator:
Mss 182
Internet Media Type:
image/jpeg
Digitization Specifications:
300 dpi, 24-bit depth color, Epson Expression 10000XL, Archival Masters are tiffs.
Copyright Status Statement:
Copyright © College of Charleston Libraries.
Access Information:
All rights reserved. For more information and reuse requirements contact The College of Charleston Library, Charleston SC 29424.