Letter from Gertrude Sanford Legendre, January 24, 1944

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    R 2 12 44 46 Jan 24th '44 Dear Sidney, To-day was a red letter day for me.- I received No 71,77,78,all V. mail, also the Night Bloomin Cereus flower which is heavenly. I have all those cards on my ma[n]tle-piece and they really are most attractive. I love them. Everybody remarks on them that come to dinner, and I think it is such a nice idea of yours to send them every week. Your letter written Xmas day in the office did not sound too gay. I dont wonder. I too was in the office in the morning but not after one o' clock. I wrote you all about it. I certainly am sorry you did not receive a letter from me on Xmas day[,] and ofcourse I sent you a cable several days before hoping you would get that on Xmas day too. But these mails are really hopeless- there is no use worrying about it. One can be sure both parties have written lots, but that transportation to each others theatre juast does not work out as it should. I received your Xmas present to-day too,along with all the batch of V mails. I love that hawaiian material so much. It is so gay, and makes one think of flowers and sunshine. Its a wrapper[,] and I shall get lots of pleasure out of it. Thank you so much my darling. The silk handkerc hiefs with the c[o]lored painted flowers on them are lovely. You know I love color and these are just made for me. You were sweet to find them and send them, and I want you to know I love them.Thank you so much. After reading all your letters to-day several times[,]what strikes me more than anything is the contrast between the two places we are each living in. You could not possibly find two more opposite spots in the world. Your beautiful mornings with the skye streaked with gold, your moonlight nights, your blue sea, your soft tropic air etc. etc. On the other hand here- the black bleak mornings. dressing by electric light, carrying the torch to the office, generally a drizzle, grey buildings, shoddy stores, bitter damp nip to the air, home in the pitch black night, and so it goes. I have just returned from a wonderful week end. David decided we needed a Saturday off. A real week end. None of us had had any for months. This is what took place. Evangelene, [davids nice secretary,] Me[,] Lester[,] and David left on a three thirty train Thursday for the south coast. We were headed for some attractive Inn he had heard about which was to be just the top. The train was late , we never arrived for four hours, all of us tired, Lester with a terrific case of ptomaine poisoing he had managed to contract from a bad oyster the night before, and this weary little hand arrived at the final destination quite pooped and looking forward to the charming inn, big fires, soft beds etc. etc. We motored for some thirty minutes through the black Forest and could see little it was so dark, finally we wound up in front of our destination. I knew instinctively when I saw the outside of the building- just what to expect on the inside- and I was right.Walking through the bleak outer entrance of the bare brick building one entered a hall. There facing one was a small coal grate. The two overstuffed chairs were covered in faded chintz, a large hole was burned through one cushion. Up the narrow stairs to small bedroom cubicles. Four miserable little single rooms. Each with a central ceiling light and each [End Page 1] 2 with a weak bulb. I was visable depressed and dissappointed. We said nothing and all came down to the hall and coal grate to order a cocktail before dressing for dinner[or rather before baths] Only luke warm pink Gin -no ice. I spoke up as you know I would. I said "David this is a flop"! We've come to the wrong place and we are going to ruin our entire holliday if we dont rectify our error quickly. I suggest first thing to-morrow we board that train again and get theh-- out of here and go back to the place we went over new years, near sunningdale. I was not met with joy or smiles, but silence and then a remark to the effect "that tomorrow we would probably like it, and everything would be alright." David was in such a wonderful mood at being on a holliday- his first in almost a year that nothing was going to spoil his fun. I was sorry I had said anything. Then Lester broke down and confessed he agreed with me heartily[,]and so did Evangale_ne Soon- - after discovering every bottle of wine cost four pounds, and the gin was only warm- D. also agreed we should make plans to remidy the mistake. we ordered the car. told the hotel urgent business calledus all right back to town first thing in the morning. A couple of telephone calls did it and- next morning back we went through the black forest to the train,and this time Lester had no seat and had to stand all the way. The day was the mostibeautiful I have seen since I have been over here. A bluebird day[,]and I was fit to be tied to be riding about on a railroad. Well after going right into the city, we caught an other tra train out again[,]and thirty minutes later arrived at our new destination. From here on everything was wonderful! Never have I laughed more, or had more fun. We had the world best bedrooms. Lester and David in one called the ["]Tapisty Room["] which was as large as the drawing room at 9mEast 72nd st.and which we proceede d to all use as a sitting room. I had a nice one on the floor above under the eves[,] and so did Evangalene. We had a wonderful dinner, delicious wine, cold cocktails, and from then on everything was fun. Bill Jackson was down there too and felt the place was his own private discovery. Next day it was blowing and pretty cold but Lester and I played eighteen holes of golf in the morning, and eighteen in the afternoon.[W]e met David and Evangalene for lunch in the midst of it all at an otherplace called The Brook[,]and they went for a walk while we golfed. Next day the whole thing was repeated- more golf, a different course, one called ent- worth which had turf as perfect as the Seminole. Never have I seen courses in s such wonderful shape, or more beautiful, ofcourse that is due to the climate over here. We had caddies each day and I have rarely enjoyed anything more since you went away. An other boy called Stew MacClintic joined us for golf Sunday, and we all really had a wonderful holliday. The only draw back as far as I was conserned was what always happens when one goes on a trip of any kind.---- I had to get my troubles just that weekend. - but I assure you nothing was going to interfere with my fun and I golfed anyway, and am surprised I dont feel worse than I do. I had hoped to leave my cold germs behind me but I am afraid they are still rampant. Caughing just drives me nuts[,]but I presume I shall get overit next summer. I suppose you read in the papers about the airraids- but dont give it at thought. They are noisy sometimes but thats all. I generally sleep right through them. We got back to the office this morning and found nothing much had happened during our absence. Thats always the way is n t it? That is very interesting about Morris giving up smoking and feeling bett- ter. Think I should too but it is so difficult particularly in an office. I smoke about eight packages a week which is n[o]t really bad. I had a Xmas card from Hunty and Jimmy. They have sold their Pla[T]ation and are living in a rented place near Baltimore. Hunty has a defence Job. I spoke to Ben today and asked him if he was out of a job now that Tony had gone inthe Army. He said he thought maybe he had. He was n't sure yet. Perha[ps] he will get a tr[i]p home. He hopes so. ALL my love to you sweets till my next. Gertrude S. Legendre [End Page 2]
  • Image 01
    R 2 12 44 46 Jan 24th '44 Dear Sidney, To-day was a red letter day for me.- I received No 71,77,78,all V. mail, also the Night Bloomin Cereus flower which is heavenly. I have all those cards on my ma[n]tle-piece and they really are most attractive. I love them. Everybody remarks on them that come to dinner, and I think it is such a nice idea of yours to send them every week. Your letter written Xmas day in the office did not sound too gay. I dont wonder. I too was in the office in the morning but not after one o' clock. I wrote you all about it. I certainly am sorry you did not receive a letter from me on Xmas day[,] and ofcourse I sent you a cable several days before hoping you would get that on Xmas day too. But these mails are really hopeless- there is no use worrying about it. One can be sure both parties have written lots, but that transportation to each others theatre juast does not work out as it should. I received your Xmas present to-day too,along with all the batch of V mails. I love that hawaiian material so much. It is so gay, and makes one think of flowers and sunshine. Its a wrapper[,] and I shall get lots of pleasure out of it. Thank you so much my darling. The silk handkerc hiefs with the c[o]lored painted flowers on them are lovely. You know I love color and these are just made for me. You were sweet to find them and send them, and I want you to know I love them.Thank you so much. After reading all your letters to-day several times[,]what strikes me more than anything is the contrast between the two places we are each living in. You could not possibly find two more opposite spots in the world. Your beautiful mornings with the skye streaked with gold, your moonlight nights, your blue sea, your soft tropic air etc. etc. On the other hand here- the black bleak mornings. dressing by electric light, carrying the torch to the office, generally a drizzle, grey buildings, shoddy stores, bitter damp nip to the air, home in the pitch black night, and so it goes. I have just returned from a wonderful week end. David decided we needed a Saturday off. A real week end. None of us had had any for months. This is what took place. Evangelene, [davids nice secretary,] Me[,] Lester[,] and David left on a three thirty train Thursday for the south coast. We were headed for some attractive Inn he had heard about which was to be just the top. The train was late , we never arrived for four hours, all of us tired, Lester with a terrific case of ptomaine poisoing he had managed to contract from a bad oyster the night before, and this weary little hand arrived at the final destination quite pooped and looking forward to the charming inn, big fires, soft beds etc. etc. We motored for some thirty minutes through the black Forest and could see little it was so dark, finally we wound up in front of our destination. I knew instinctively when I saw the outside of the building- just what to expect on the inside- and I was right.Walking through the bleak outer entrance of the bare brick building one entered a hall. There facing one was a small coal grate. The two overstuffed chairs were covered in faded chintz, a large hole was burned through one cushion. Up the narrow stairs to small bedroom cubicles. Four miserable little single rooms. Each with a central ceiling light and each [End Page 1] 2 with a weak bulb. I was visable depressed and dissappointed. We said nothing and all came down to the hall and coal grate to order a cocktail before dressing for dinner[or rather before baths] Only luke warm pink Gin -no ice. I spoke up as you know I would. I said "David this is a flop"! We've come to the wrong place and we are going to ruin our entire holliday if we dont rectify our error quickly. I suggest first thing to-morrow we board that train again and get theh-- out of here and go back to the place we went over new years, near sunningdale. I was not met with joy or smiles, but silence and then a remark to the effect "that tomorrow we would probably like it, and everything would be alright." David was in such a wonderful mood at being on a holliday- his first in almost a year that nothing was going to spoil his fun. I was sorry I had said anything. Then Lester broke down and confessed he agreed with me heartily[,]and so did Evangale_ne Soon- - after discovering every bottle of wine cost four pounds, and the gin was only warm- D. also agreed we should make plans to remidy the mistake. we ordered the car. told the hotel urgent business calledus all right back to town first thing in the morning. A couple of telephone calls did it and- next morning back we went through the black forest to the train,and this time Lester had no seat and had to stand all the way. The day was the mostibeautiful I have seen since I have been over here. A bluebird day[,]and I was fit to be tied to be riding about on a railroad. Well after going right into the city, we caught an other tra train out again[,]and thirty minutes later arrived at our new destination. From here on everything was wonderful! Never have I laughed more, or had more fun. We had the world best bedrooms. Lester and David in one called the ["]Tapisty Room["] which was as large as the drawing room at 9mEast 72nd st.and which we proceede d to all use as a sitting room. I had a nice one on the floor above under the eves[,] and so did Evangalene. We had a wonderful dinner, delicious wine, cold cocktails, and from then on everything was fun. Bill Jackson was down there too and felt the place was his own private discovery. Next day it was blowing and pretty cold but Lester and I played eighteen holes of golf in the morning, and eighteen in the afternoon.[W]e met David and Evangalene for lunch in the midst of it all at an otherplace called The Brook[,]and they went for a walk while we golfed. Next day the whole thing was repeated- more golf, a different course, one called ent- worth which had turf as perfect as the Seminole. Never have I seen courses in s such wonderful shape, or more beautiful, ofcourse that is due to the climate over here. We had caddies each day and I have rarely enjoyed anything more since you went away. An other boy called Stew MacClintic joined us for golf Sunday, and we all really had a wonderful holliday. The only draw back as far as I was conserned was what always happens when one goes on a trip of any kind.---- I had to get my troubles just that weekend. - but I assure you nothing was going to interfere with my fun and I golfed anyway, and am surprised I dont feel worse than I do. I had hoped to leave my cold germs behind me but I am afraid they are still rampant. Caughing just drives me nuts[,]but I presume I shall get overit next summer. I suppose you read in the papers about the airraids- but dont give it at thought. They are noisy sometimes but thats all. I generally sleep right through them. We got back to the office this morning and found nothing much had happened during our absence. Thats always the way is n t it? That is very interesting about Morris giving up smoking and feeling bett- ter. Think I should too but it is so difficult particularly in an office. I smoke about eight packages a week which is n[o]t really bad. I had a Xmas card from Hunty and Jimmy. They have sold their Pla[T]ation and are living in a rented place near Baltimore. Hunty has a defence Job. I spoke to Ben today and asked him if he was out of a job now that Tony had gone inthe Army. He said he thought maybe he had. He was n't sure yet. Perha[ps] he will get a tr[i]p home. He hopes so. ALL my love to you sweets till my next. Gertrude S. Legendre [End Page 2]
Title:
Letter from Gertrude Sanford Legendre, January 24, 1944
Creator:
Legendre, Gertrude Sanford, 1902-2000
Date:
1944-01-24
Description:
Letter from Gertrude Legendre to her husband, Sidney Legendre, regarding Sidney’s life in Hawaii and a weekend she spent in the country golfing with friends.
Collection:
Gertrude Sanford Legendre Papers, 1844-1996
Contributing Institution:
College of Charleston Libraries
Media Type:
Manuscripts
Personal or Corporate Subject:
Legendre, Gertrude Sanford, 1902-2000, Legendre, Sidney Jennings, 1903-1948
Topical Subject:
World War, 1939-1945, Christmas
Geographic Subject:
England
Language:
English
Series:
Gertrude Sanford Legendre Papers: Correspondence
Shelving Locator:
Mss 182
Internet Media Type:
image/jpeg
Digitization Specifications:
300 dpi, 24-bit depth color, Epson Expression 10000XL, Archival Masters are tiffs.
Copyright Status Statement:
Copyright © College of Charleston Libraries.
Access Information:
All rights reserved. For more information and reuse requirements contact The College of Charleston Library, Charleston SC 29424.