Letter from George Weedon to Nathanael Greene

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    [George Weedon to Nathanael Greene July 18, 1780 [RvW Box 2 Folder 45; MSS. – A.L.S.]] Fredrbg. July 18th 1780 My Dear Sir Your favr. of 9th Inst. got safe to hand last evening. I had just rec.d an Account of your affair with Mr. Kniphausan at Springfield, and intended this post to have Congratulated you on your success, - your Ob- -servation respecting the people of America [and] the rules that's set over them, is perfectly just, - The whole Con- -tinent seems to have received a paralytick stroke and now totter with a palsy. the reflection is alarming to think of the resources we have amongst us and that ways and means cannot be devised by our knowing ones, to profusly [sic] draw them forth. America is full of supplies of every kind and not- -withstanding she is now fighting for her all, none can be found. If we fail in the present Contest, it will not be for want of means; in fact we shall die of the Doctor. Virginia seems to have received a more Severe stroke than any of her sister States. she had totally relaxed into a Lethargy. Cornwallis's advance however, has rouged them in some measure and has made an Alteration in the Disorder; there is now a ray of hope. – The mode for re-enlisting her Continental Quota, as hinted to you in my last is in part adopted, She is to rain Bavo men immed- -diately by Classing the militia into Squads of 15 men, obliging each Squad to find a man by a given time as to cast both amongst themselves who shall go. This plan would have raised five Thousand men, had the whole of the militia been included, but some of the Back Countries are excused on Account of a threaten -ed invasion by Sullivans opponent Mr. Butler, who it is said, is preparing for that purpose. and another [End Page 1] reason is, they are not to Class any under the age of 18 years. of Age, This would have done pretty well had they raised them for the war. but would you believe it! That notwithstanding the many recent, and I may add fatal Examples, of short Enlistments, they have raised them to serve 18 months only! My prayers and Supplications was for the war. I painted the fatal tendency of such a measure in the most alarming Colours I could draw it, but all [?] not do, and this strange infatuation prevailed, from the shameful frustration [as you observe] of public good to Po- -polar motives. – They have also adopted the re- -commendation of Congress respecting finance, much manuevring [sic] was used for this purpose, - When it was first introduced they rejected it by a Vote of [7?] against 23. Means were found to bring it on again in the coarse of the Session, and after many days Debate, and a most Violent opposition in every stage of the Bill, it was at last carried by a majority of two. – If the assembly had not rescinded their first determination, we were all undone. persisting in their first Idea would not only deprived us of resources, but the Example might have been fatal to the whole Continent. This added to their [?] policy, and their want of Exertion in affording timely assistance to South Carolina would have placed us in a very disagreable [sic] point of view with respect too the other States. – North Carolina is still fast asleep, notwithstanding the Enemy Knock at their doors. Major Fosythe has this day returned from thence where he has been on the Business of his Department, he informs that it was with the utmost Difficulty he could find supplies sufficient for the Troops going forward. he brings an Accot. [End Page 2] of a body of Tories of near a Thousand strong being defeated by a Col.o [Colonel] Loche, who killed 70, and made 200 prisoners, These rascals were Armed and embodied in the back parts of that Country [and] were making their way to the British Stand and by two different routs, foraging and laying wast [sic] the Country as they went. – Gen. l [General] Gates has gone forward. I note your friendly hints, upon the Service of the Southern Department, and was previously deter- -mined in my line of Conduct, well knowing the bad effects of party darings and trust I shall not be backward in duty. – I have been honored with a very polite letter from the president of Congress inclosing their Resolution for Calling me into Service again. This was so fair an opening of for retorting that I could not help embracing it I told them in plain words of their treatment toward me, I reminded them of a Subsequent Resolve which they past [sic] after I left them, of forbiding [sic] any officer who should resign his Command, coming into Service again, on any other Terms than as youngest, of the Rank In which he belonged, and concluded by telling them that the total Deranged situation of our affairs in the South, and the Glowing Countenanc[e] of things in General were Sufficient motives [as the Obstical [sic] which gave me uneasiness was in some measure removed] for my ready Obedience to their Call, And that my Exertions should not be wanting so long as I could Act Consistant [sic] with my feelings as an Officer, and so long as my honor was not violated by the hands of power. - You are pleased to [End Page 3] flatter me Exceeding in one paragraph of your letter modisty [sic] forbids my saying anything more on that head than “Thank you[“]. Where in the name of wonder is the French fleet? I have been in hourely [sic] Expectation of hearing of their Arrival these three weeks, and begin now to think they have touched at the vast Indias for some particular Operations there, before they come on our Coast. – I am pleased to hear of your Ladies Health, perhaps we may have a Cotilian [sic] together one of these days. pray make my respect to her, [and] believe me very affectionately My Dear Genl. [General] Yr. Most Obt Servt. [Your Most Obedient Servant] G. [George] Weedon P.S. When you see the worthy little Marquis, tell him I congratulate him sincerely on his once more coming a mongst us. - GW [George Weedon] [Endorsed on right margin:] From Genl. [General] Weedon July 18th. 1780. 55 Virginia 146 [End Page 4]
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    [George Weedon to Nathanael Greene July 18, 1780 [RvW Box 2 Folder 45; MSS. – A.L.S.]] Fredrbg. July 18th 1780 My Dear Sir Your favr. of 9th Inst. got safe to hand last evening. I had just rec.d an Account of your affair with Mr. Kniphausan at Springfield, and intended this post to have Congratulated you on your success, - your Ob- -servation respecting the people of America [and] the rules that's set over them, is perfectly just, - The whole Con- -tinent seems to have received a paralytick stroke and now totter with a palsy. the reflection is alarming to think of the resources we have amongst us and that ways and means cannot be devised by our knowing ones, to profusly [sic] draw them forth. America is full of supplies of every kind and not- -withstanding she is now fighting for her all, none can be found. If we fail in the present Contest, it will not be for want of means; in fact we shall die of the Doctor. Virginia seems to have received a more Severe stroke than any of her sister States. she had totally relaxed into a Lethargy. Cornwallis's advance however, has rouged them in some measure and has made an Alteration in the Disorder; there is now a ray of hope. – The mode for re-enlisting her Continental Quota, as hinted to you in my last is in part adopted, She is to rain Bavo men immed- -diately by Classing the militia into Squads of 15 men, obliging each Squad to find a man by a given time as to cast both amongst themselves who shall go. This plan would have raised five Thousand men, had the whole of the militia been included, but some of the Back Countries are excused on Account of a threaten -ed invasion by Sullivans opponent Mr. Butler, who it is said, is preparing for that purpose. and another [End Page 1] reason is, they are not to Class any under the age of 18 years. of Age, This would have done pretty well had they raised them for the war. but would you believe it! That notwithstanding the many recent, and I may add fatal Examples, of short Enlistments, they have raised them to serve 18 months only! My prayers and Supplications was for the war. I painted the fatal tendency of such a measure in the most alarming Colours I could draw it, but all [?] not do, and this strange infatuation prevailed, from the shameful frustration [as you observe] of public good to Po- -polar motives. – They have also adopted the re- -commendation of Congress respecting finance, much manuevring [sic] was used for this purpose, - When it was first introduced they rejected it by a Vote of [7?] against 23. Means were found to bring it on again in the coarse of the Session, and after many days Debate, and a most Violent opposition in every stage of the Bill, it was at last carried by a majority of two. – If the assembly had not rescinded their first determination, we were all undone. persisting in their first Idea would not only deprived us of resources, but the Example might have been fatal to the whole Continent. This added to their [?] policy, and their want of Exertion in affording timely assistance to South Carolina would have placed us in a very disagreable [sic] point of view with respect too the other States. – North Carolina is still fast asleep, notwithstanding the Enemy Knock at their doors. Major Fosythe has this day returned from thence where he has been on the Business of his Department, he informs that it was with the utmost Difficulty he could find supplies sufficient for the Troops going forward. he brings an Accot. [End Page 2] of a body of Tories of near a Thousand strong being defeated by a Col.o [Colonel] Loche, who killed 70, and made 200 prisoners, These rascals were Armed and embodied in the back parts of that Country [and] were making their way to the British Stand and by two different routs, foraging and laying wast [sic] the Country as they went. – Gen. l [General] Gates has gone forward. I note your friendly hints, upon the Service of the Southern Department, and was previously deter- -mined in my line of Conduct, well knowing the bad effects of party darings and trust I shall not be backward in duty. – I have been honored with a very polite letter from the president of Congress inclosing their Resolution for Calling me into Service again. This was so fair an opening of for retorting that I could not help embracing it I told them in plain words of their treatment toward me, I reminded them of a Subsequent Resolve which they past [sic] after I left them, of forbiding [sic] any officer who should resign his Command, coming into Service again, on any other Terms than as youngest, of the Rank In which he belonged, and concluded by telling them that the total Deranged situation of our affairs in the South, and the Glowing Countenanc[e] of things in General were Sufficient motives [as the Obstical [sic] which gave me uneasiness was in some measure removed] for my ready Obedience to their Call, And that my Exertions should not be wanting so long as I could Act Consistant [sic] with my feelings as an Officer, and so long as my honor was not violated by the hands of power. - You are pleased to [End Page 3] flatter me Exceeding in one paragraph of your letter modisty [sic] forbids my saying anything more on that head than “Thank you[“]. Where in the name of wonder is the French fleet? I have been in hourely [sic] Expectation of hearing of their Arrival these three weeks, and begin now to think they have touched at the vast Indias for some particular Operations there, before they come on our Coast. – I am pleased to hear of your Ladies Health, perhaps we may have a Cotilian [sic] together one of these days. pray make my respect to her, [and] believe me very affectionately My Dear Genl. [General] Yr. Most Obt Servt. [Your Most Obedient Servant] G. [George] Weedon P.S. When you see the worthy little Marquis, tell him I congratulate him sincerely on his once more coming a mongst us. - GW [George Weedon] [Endorsed on right margin:] From Genl. [General] Weedon July 18th. 1780. 55 Virginia 146 [End Page 4]
  • Image 01
    [George Weedon to Nathanael Greene July 18, 1780 [RvW Box 2 Folder 45; MSS. – A.L.S.]] Fredrbg. July 18th 1780 My Dear Sir Your favr. of 9th Inst. got safe to hand last evening. I had just rec.d an Account of your affair with Mr. Kniphausan at Springfield, and intended this post to have Congratulated you on your success, - your Ob- -servation respecting the people of America [and] the rules that's set over them, is perfectly just, - The whole Con- -tinent seems to have received a paralytick stroke and now totter with a palsy. the reflection is alarming to think of the resources we have amongst us and that ways and means cannot be devised by our knowing ones, to profusly [sic] draw them forth. America is full of supplies of every kind and not- -withstanding she is now fighting for her all, none can be found. If we fail in the present Contest, it will not be for want of means; in fact we shall die of the Doctor. Virginia seems to have received a more Severe stroke than any of her sister States. she had totally relaxed into a Lethargy. Cornwallis's advance however, has rouged them in some measure and has made an Alteration in the Disorder; there is now a ray of hope. – The mode for re-enlisting her Continental Quota, as hinted to you in my last is in part adopted, She is to rain Bavo men immed- -diately by Classing the militia into Squads of 15 men, obliging each Squad to find a man by a given time as to cast both amongst themselves who shall go. This plan would have raised five Thousand men, had the whole of the militia been included, but some of the Back Countries are excused on Account of a threaten -ed invasion by Sullivans opponent Mr. Butler, who it is said, is preparing for that purpose. and another [End Page 1] reason is, they are not to Class any under the age of 18 years. of Age, This would have done pretty well had they raised them for the war. but would you believe it! That notwithstanding the many recent, and I may add fatal Examples, of short Enlistments, they have raised them to serve 18 months only! My prayers and Supplications was for the war. I painted the fatal tendency of such a measure in the most alarming Colours I could draw it, but all [?] not do, and this strange infatuation prevailed, from the shameful frustration [as you observe] of public good to Po- -polar motives. – They have also adopted the re- -commendation of Congress respecting finance, much manuevring [sic] was used for this purpose, - When it was first introduced they rejected it by a Vote of [7?] against 23. Means were found to bring it on again in the coarse of the Session, and after many days Debate, and a most Violent opposition in every stage of the Bill, it was at last carried by a majority of two. – If the assembly had not rescinded their first determination, we were all undone. persisting in their first Idea would not only deprived us of resources, but the Example might have been fatal to the whole Continent. This added to their [?] policy, and their want of Exertion in affording timely assistance to South Carolina would have placed us in a very disagreable [sic] point of view with respect too the other States. – North Carolina is still fast asleep, notwithstanding the Enemy Knock at their doors. Major Fosythe has this day returned from thence where he has been on the Business of his Department, he informs that it was with the utmost Difficulty he could find supplies sufficient for the Troops going forward. he brings an Accot. [End Page 2] of a body of Tories of near a Thousand strong being defeated by a Col.o [Colonel] Loche, who killed 70, and made 200 prisoners, These rascals were Armed and embodied in the back parts of that Country [and] were making their way to the British Stand and by two different routs, foraging and laying wast [sic] the Country as they went. – Gen. l [General] Gates has gone forward. I note your friendly hints, upon the Service of the Southern Department, and was previously deter- -mined in my line of Conduct, well knowing the bad effects of party darings and trust I shall not be backward in duty. – I have been honored with a very polite letter from the president of Congress inclosing their Resolution for Calling me into Service again. This was so fair an opening of for retorting that I could not help embracing it I told them in plain words of their treatment toward me, I reminded them of a Subsequent Resolve which they past [sic] after I left them, of forbiding [sic] any officer who should resign his Command, coming into Service again, on any other Terms than as youngest, of the Rank In which he belonged, and concluded by telling them that the total Deranged situation of our affairs in the South, and the Glowing Countenanc[e] of things in General were Sufficient motives [as the Obstical [sic] which gave me uneasiness was in some measure removed] for my ready Obedience to their Call, And that my Exertions should not be wanting so long as I could Act Consistant [sic] with my feelings as an Officer, and so long as my honor was not violated by the hands of power. - You are pleased to [End Page 3] flatter me Exceeding in one paragraph of your letter modisty [sic] forbids my saying anything more on that head than “Thank you[“]. Where in the name of wonder is the French fleet? I have been in hourely [sic] Expectation of hearing of their Arrival these three weeks, and begin now to think they have touched at the vast Indias for some particular Operations there, before they come on our Coast. – I am pleased to hear of your Ladies Health, perhaps we may have a Cotilian [sic] together one of these days. pray make my respect to her, [and] believe me very affectionately My Dear Genl. [General] Yr. Most Obt Servt. [Your Most Obedient Servant] G. [George] Weedon P.S. When you see the worthy little Marquis, tell him I congratulate him sincerely on his once more coming a mongst us. - GW [George Weedon] [Endorsed on right margin:] From Genl. [General] Weedon July 18th. 1780. 55 Virginia 146 [End Page 4]
  • Image 01
    [George Weedon to Nathanael Greene July 18, 1780 [RvW Box 2 Folder 45; MSS. – A.L.S.]] Fredrbg. July 18th 1780 My Dear Sir Your favr. of 9th Inst. got safe to hand last evening. I had just rec.d an Account of your affair with Mr. Kniphausan at Springfield, and intended this post to have Congratulated you on your success, - your Ob- -servation respecting the people of America [and] the rules that's set over them, is perfectly just, - The whole Con- -tinent seems to have received a paralytick stroke and now totter with a palsy. the reflection is alarming to think of the resources we have amongst us and that ways and means cannot be devised by our knowing ones, to profusly [sic] draw them forth. America is full of supplies of every kind and not- -withstanding she is now fighting for her all, none can be found. If we fail in the present Contest, it will not be for want of means; in fact we shall die of the Doctor. Virginia seems to have received a more Severe stroke than any of her sister States. she had totally relaxed into a Lethargy. Cornwallis's advance however, has rouged them in some measure and has made an Alteration in the Disorder; there is now a ray of hope. – The mode for re-enlisting her Continental Quota, as hinted to you in my last is in part adopted, She is to rain Bavo men immed- -diately by Classing the militia into Squads of 15 men, obliging each Squad to find a man by a given time as to cast both amongst themselves who shall go. This plan would have raised five Thousand men, had the whole of the militia been included, but some of the Back Countries are excused on Account of a threaten -ed invasion by Sullivans opponent Mr. Butler, who it is said, is preparing for that purpose. and another [End Page 1] reason is, they are not to Class any under the age of 18 years. of Age, This would have done pretty well had they raised them for the war. but would you believe it! That notwithstanding the many recent, and I may add fatal Examples, of short Enlistments, they have raised them to serve 18 months only! My prayers and Supplications was for the war. I painted the fatal tendency of such a measure in the most alarming Colours I could draw it, but all [?] not do, and this strange infatuation prevailed, from the shameful frustration [as you observe] of public good to Po- -polar motives. – They have also adopted the re- -commendation of Congress respecting finance, much manuevring [sic] was used for this purpose, - When it was first introduced they rejected it by a Vote of [7?] against 23. Means were found to bring it on again in the coarse of the Session, and after many days Debate, and a most Violent opposition in every stage of the Bill, it was at last carried by a majority of two. – If the assembly had not rescinded their first determination, we were all undone. persisting in their first Idea would not only deprived us of resources, but the Example might have been fatal to the whole Continent. This added to their [?] policy, and their want of Exertion in affording timely assistance to South Carolina would have placed us in a very disagreable [sic] point of view with respect too the other States. – North Carolina is still fast asleep, notwithstanding the Enemy Knock at their doors. Major Fosythe has this day returned from thence where he has been on the Business of his Department, he informs that it was with the utmost Difficulty he could find supplies sufficient for the Troops going forward. he brings an Accot. [End Page 2] of a body of Tories of near a Thousand strong being defeated by a Col.o [Colonel] Loche, who killed 70, and made 200 prisoners, These rascals were Armed and embodied in the back parts of that Country [and] were making their way to the British Stand and by two different routs, foraging and laying wast [sic] the Country as they went. – Gen. l [General] Gates has gone forward. I note your friendly hints, upon the Service of the Southern Department, and was previously deter- -mined in my line of Conduct, well knowing the bad effects of party darings and trust I shall not be backward in duty. – I have been honored with a very polite letter from the president of Congress inclosing their Resolution for Calling me into Service again. This was so fair an opening of for retorting that I could not help embracing it I told them in plain words of their treatment toward me, I reminded them of a Subsequent Resolve which they past [sic] after I left them, of forbiding [sic] any officer who should resign his Command, coming into Service again, on any other Terms than as youngest, of the Rank In which he belonged, and concluded by telling them that the total Deranged situation of our affairs in the South, and the Glowing Countenanc[e] of things in General were Sufficient motives [as the Obstical [sic] which gave me uneasiness was in some measure removed] for my ready Obedience to their Call, And that my Exertions should not be wanting so long as I could Act Consistant [sic] with my feelings as an Officer, and so long as my honor was not violated by the hands of power. - You are pleased to [End Page 3] flatter me Exceeding in one paragraph of your letter modisty [sic] forbids my saying anything more on that head than “Thank you[“]. Where in the name of wonder is the French fleet? I have been in hourely [sic] Expectation of hearing of their Arrival these three weeks, and begin now to think they have touched at the vast Indias for some particular Operations there, before they come on our Coast. – I am pleased to hear of your Ladies Health, perhaps we may have a Cotilian [sic] together one of these days. pray make my respect to her, [and] believe me very affectionately My Dear Genl. [General] Yr. Most Obt Servt. [Your Most Obedient Servant] G. [George] Weedon P.S. When you see the worthy little Marquis, tell him I congratulate him sincerely on his once more coming a mongst us. - GW [George Weedon] [Endorsed on right margin:] From Genl. [General] Weedon July 18th. 1780. 55 Virginia 146 [End Page 4]
Title:
Letter from George Weedon to Nathanael Greene
Creator:
Weedon, George, 1734-1793
Date:
1780-07-18
Description:
Letter from George Weedon to Nathanael Greene regarding the climate of the state of Virginia, the imminent attack of Lord Cornwallis, and the campaign to raise recruitment. Weedon goes on to discuss the climate of the South, in general, the disadvantage of South Carolina, and the lack of action from North Carolina.
Collection:
Charleston Museum Collection of Revolutionary War Letters
Contributing Institution:
The Charleston Museum Archives
Media Type:
Manuscripts
Personal or Corporate Subject:
Weedon, George, 1734-1793, Greene, Nathanael, 1742-1786--Correspondence, Greene, Nathanael, 1742-1786--Military service, Greene, Nathanael, 1742-1786--Military leadership, Greene, Nathanael, 1742-1786
Topical Subject:
War, armed forces, and society
Geographic Subject:
United States--History--Revolution, 1775-1783, United States--History--Revolution, 1775-1783--American forces, Savannah River (Ga. and S.C.)
S.C. County:
Charleston County (S.C.)
Internet Media Type:
image/jpeg
Digitization Specifications:
600 ppi, 24-bit depth, color, Epson Expression 10000XL, Archival Masters are tiffs.
Copyright Status Statement:
Public domain.
Access Information:
For more information contact The Charleston Museum, 360 Meeting Street, Charleston, SC 29403.