Letter from Richard Henry Lee to [Nathanael Greene]

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    [Richard Henry Lee to [Nathanael Greene] October 5, 1782 [RvW Box 2 Folder 42; MSS. – A.L.S.]] Dear Sir, Chantilly October the 5th 1782 I am happy in so good an opportunity as Capt. Carne's presents for paying my respects to you, which I should much oftener do, if safe conveyances more frequently offered. We are here induced to hope that the enemy will leave you nothing more to do in the south by their evacuation of Charles Town in the course of this month. You will then have the glory of commen- -cing, prosecuting, and effecting the recovery of a great part of this union from the grasp of Tyranny and oppression. The south must long remember your services and be grateful for them. It is the conjecture of many that New York will also be evacuated, but I fear that adversity hath not yet sufficiently chastened the Tyrants mind to produce such a total giving up of N. America as the quitting N. York would imply. This idea seems to be strongly suggested by the parliamentary debates upon the resignation of Mr. Fox, which leaves no room to doubt about the fixt determination not to yield the independence of these States but to the most invincible necessity. The last account from England informs us that the negotiation was still going on, but that little effect was expected from it as the King was obstinate and [End Page 1] and had a Ministry to his mind. But tho the King be obstinate and has a ministry to his mind, and altho N. York be not speedily quitted, I am much mistaken if the necessity of the case does not soon compel the British King to grin [and] grant independence to America. A fine lesson this for Tyrants who may learn from hence, that evil deeds may force with convulsive pangs from the tortured soul, that which it most abhors to grant. Gen. Washington is now at the head of 17,000 men well appointed and well disciplined, so that we are in a good posture to meet whatever turn affairs may take. Accept, if you please, my best wishes for your health and prosperity, for I am with great sincerity and affectionate esteem Sir your most obedient [and] very humble Servant Richard Henry Lee [End Page 2] [Endorsed on left margin:] From Rd. [Richard] Henry Lee Octr. [October] 5th 1782 146 [End Page 3]
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    [Richard Henry Lee to [Nathanael Greene] October 5, 1782 [RvW Box 2 Folder 42; MSS. – A.L.S.]] Dear Sir, Chantilly October the 5th 1782 I am happy in so good an opportunity as Capt. Carne's presents for paying my respects to you, which I should much oftener do, if safe conveyances more frequently offered. We are here induced to hope that the enemy will leave you nothing more to do in the south by their evacuation of Charles Town in the course of this month. You will then have the glory of commen- -cing, prosecuting, and effecting the recovery of a great part of this union from the grasp of Tyranny and oppression. The south must long remember your services and be grateful for them. It is the conjecture of many that New York will also be evacuated, but I fear that adversity hath not yet sufficiently chastened the Tyrants mind to produce such a total giving up of N. America as the quitting N. York would imply. This idea seems to be strongly suggested by the parliamentary debates upon the resignation of Mr. Fox, which leaves no room to doubt about the fixt determination not to yield the independence of these States but to the most invincible necessity. The last account from England informs us that the negotiation was still going on, but that little effect was expected from it as the King was obstinate and [End Page 1] and had a Ministry to his mind. But tho the King be obstinate and has a ministry to his mind, and altho N. York be not speedily quitted, I am much mistaken if the necessity of the case does not soon compel the British King to grin [and] grant independence to America. A fine lesson this for Tyrants who may learn from hence, that evil deeds may force with convulsive pangs from the tortured soul, that which it most abhors to grant. Gen. Washington is now at the head of 17,000 men well appointed and well disciplined, so that we are in a good posture to meet whatever turn affairs may take. Accept, if you please, my best wishes for your health and prosperity, for I am with great sincerity and affectionate esteem Sir your most obedient [and] very humble Servant Richard Henry Lee [End Page 2] [Endorsed on left margin:] From Rd. [Richard] Henry Lee Octr. [October] 5th 1782 146 [End Page 3]
Title:
Letter from Richard Henry Lee to [Nathanael Greene]
Creator:
Lee, Richard Henry, 1732-1794
Date:
1782-10-05
Description:
Letter from Richard Henry Lee to [Nathanael Greene] regarding the British evacuation of ‘Charles Towne’ and the stubbornness of the English King to release America and therefore, end the war.
Collection:
Charleston Museum Collection of Revolutionary War Letters
Contributing Institution:
The Charleston Museum Archives
Media Type:
Manuscripts
Personal or Corporate Subject:
Lee, Richard Henry, 1732-1794--Correspondence, Lee, Richard Henry, 1732-1794, Greene, Nathanael, 1742-1786--Correspondence, Greene, Nathanael, 1742-1786--Military service, Greene, Nathanael, 1742-1786--Military leadership, Greene, Nathanael, 1742-1786
Topical Subject:
War, armed forces, and society
Geographic Subject:
United States--History--Revolution, 1775-1783, United States--History--Revolution, 1775-1783--American forces, Cainhoy (S.C.)
S.C. County:
Charleston County (S.C.)
Internet Media Type:
image/jpeg
Digitization Specifications:
600 ppi, 24-bit depth, color, Epson Expression 10000XL, Archival Masters are tiffs.
Copyright Status Statement:
Public domain.
Access Information:
For more information contact The Charleston Museum, 360 Meeting Street, Charleston, SC 29403.