Letter from James Mitchell Varnum to Nathanael Greene

  • Image 01
    [James Mitchell Varnum to Nathanael Greene March 26, 1780 [RvW Box 1 Folder 26; MSS. – A.L.S.]] Providence 26th March, 1780 Sir – Your Favors of February 10th, and 17th last have been received; but no Inclosures, as yet, from Virginia, respecting the Prize Caroline; However, the day of Grace is not yet pass'd, as by a deep Finesse in Politicks, the present March Term of the Superior Court, is carried into September next, altho' Several Coup's de main have been play'd off to prevent it - Your Ideas of the British Militia Establishment correspond with mine, so far as they are applicable to a monarchical Government. In a Confediration [sic] of democratical States, animated with the Feelings of Equality, almost to Licentiousness, you must, I am persuaded, be convinced that Freemen will not submit to a Distinction of Orders so ma terial as that you prefer. But, could I decide in adopting the best military Establishment, the Swit- zerland should be considered as infinitely superior to all others. That was dictated by Necessity, and found, by long Experience, absolutely perfect. Such Restrictions notwithstanding, could not there have been endured, but from the particular Situation and Circumstances of the Cantons, surrounded by potent Nations. Poor in themselves, cultivating a Soil of uncommon Sterility, prizing Liberty, con temning Affluence with Chains, they relied upon their Defiles and their Establishment for Defence. Hence it is that they compose their regular Militia of the one Third of all their fencible Men, constituting the Re mainder as a Corps de Reserve, for supplying all Deficiencies by Draft, and even taking the Field occa sionally when the first may be incapable of preven[ting] [End Page 1] Preventing an Enemy from penetrating into their Country. – Their Finances are such that their regular, veteran Battalions are kept on Foot, only for the Purpose of supporting the Revenue. The Leaders of these can never think of forming a Revolution in Government, as the regular Militia are nu merous, and amply provided with military Stores in their particular Distrects, [sic] besides the grand Magazine at Bern. My Reasons against entering into the list of Senators are many and important. – The forming [and] establishing the military force of this State upon the System already adopted in Therory [sic] is a matter that requires Time, [and] application; and is of essential Conse quence. Should I have it in its present Infancy, I greatly fear what is already done, will prove fruitless This Consideration dwells upon my mind, as I know the present War will not be terminated by the Efficiency of an adiquate [sic] continental Army; but must require Detachments from the Grand Corps de Reserve of the States. Besides which Now is the Time proper for beginning those military Es- tablishments that will hereafter be familiar to the Civil Constitution, and absolutely requisite for external Defence: Should an Attack be made in this quarter, infinite would be my Happin ness in finding the Utility of a favorite System. The present Administration have met in Con vention, according to former Ussage [sic]; applauded each other, and prepared a Prox[y]. I had the Honor of being with them, [and] objected to Messrs. Ellery and Marchant at having been too long in Congress already for the public Good, as Cabals [and]c. had been formed there, of [End Page 2] Which they must bear a part. The Goodness of the Men, extolled by those they flattered, was a suffi- cient Answer, [and] they graciously proffer'ed a Sacri- fice of poor Collins to make Way for their Opposer; And notwithstanding my Refusals have put me in the Prox, to grace the Heel of their new tryum phal [sic] Entry into political Existence. – The People at large are uneasy, and threaten an Opposition; Should it take Place, I shall join them, and may take a Seat in Congress the second part of the Campaign; The first I cannot, for Reasons already alledged [sic]. – Whatever may be the Event, I shall not fail to acquaint you; But should my Fate be such as to enter the List of Senators, my Appli cation to Business will be unremitted, when the Ob- jects shall be important. – Congress, I fully agree, seem totally inadequate to the great Concerns of their Appointment. When they demand the different Contingents of Men or Money, or other Supplies, they do it in so formal, so indiffe rent, and so careless a manner, that the respective Legislatures are led to imagine they intend only to be refused. The Vigor of Exertions ever lessens from the Source to the remotest Branches; And if Congress only exhibit an empty parade, an imaginary deceitful Shew, to obtain better Terms of Peace, with out expecting repeated Campaigns well may the States individually recline, at Ease, resolve to com- ply with their Requisitions; and, in resolving dissolve themselves into perfect Nihility. - This State have [has] voted to furnish their quota of Troops and Proportion of Supplies, and have opened the Treasury. – An Airy Phantom! The mere rever bertation of a greater Echo! – The Plan for raising Magazines in the different States, is excellent, foun ded in the most [?]righteous Policy, and would be attended with the most salutary Effects, was it en [End Page 3] Enforced by Congress, and prosecuted by the States with Suitable Energy; But when the whole Head is sick, the whole Heart is faint! – However this is the only Meathod [sic] that will keep an Army in the Field; [and] without that, we must be miserable indeed. – I think there is no Reason to apprehend great Reinforcements from Britain this Campaign. It is our Duty therefore to defend the Southern States, and dislodge the Enemy from the Eastern. Uncertain is the Fate of Europe. Whatever Alliances may be formed, America will be a capital Object, and the Appearence [sic] she makes, after so long and unequal a Struggle, in the belligerent World, will greatly influence the Powers at War, whether for, or against the House of Bourbon. – Should the Flames of Discord extend in Europe, Great Britain will probably be reinforced by the Naval Force of the three Northern Powers, will while Holland will join in the opposite Scale. My Reasons for this Conjecture are too numerous to be now explained; However, should this be the Case, all the Continental Powers, with Italy [and] the Porte will add to the Scenes of Desolation, by numerous Armies in the Field, “While the Green, will become one Red”. How important therefore it is for these States to exert themselves, to the utmost Stretch of their Abilities, every sensible Politician will readily perceive. - Mrs. Varnum is well, [and] joins me in our best Wishes for Mrs. Greene and yourself, congra- tulations on the Pleasure of your late Increase [if it is a Pleasure; [and] Mrs. Greene's Happy Recovery. I am in perfect Esteem, your very obd.t svt. [obedient servant] Major Genl. [General] Greene - JM [James Mitchell] Varnum [Endorsed in margin:] Genl. [General] Varnum 26 March 1780 [End Page 4]
  • Image 01
    [James Mitchell Varnum to Nathanael Greene March 26, 1780 [RvW Box 1 Folder 26; MSS. – A.L.S.]] Providence 26th March, 1780 Sir – Your Favors of February 10th, and 17th last have been received; but no Inclosures, as yet, from Virginia, respecting the Prize Caroline; However, the day of Grace is not yet pass'd, as by a deep Finesse in Politicks, the present March Term of the Superior Court, is carried into September next, altho' Several Coup's de main have been play'd off to prevent it - Your Ideas of the British Militia Establishment correspond with mine, so far as they are applicable to a monarchical Government. In a Confediration [sic] of democratical States, animated with the Feelings of Equality, almost to Licentiousness, you must, I am persuaded, be convinced that Freemen will not submit to a Distinction of Orders so ma terial as that you prefer. But, could I decide in adopting the best military Establishment, the Swit- zerland should be considered as infinitely superior to all others. That was dictated by Necessity, and found, by long Experience, absolutely perfect. Such Restrictions notwithstanding, could not there have been endured, but from the particular Situation and Circumstances of the Cantons, surrounded by potent Nations. Poor in themselves, cultivating a Soil of uncommon Sterility, prizing Liberty, con temning Affluence with Chains, they relied upon their Defiles and their Establishment for Defence. Hence it is that they compose their regular Militia of the one Third of all their fencible Men, constituting the Re mainder as a Corps de Reserve, for supplying all Deficiencies by Draft, and even taking the Field occa sionally when the first may be incapable of preven[ting] [End Page 1] Preventing an Enemy from penetrating into their Country. – Their Finances are such that their regular, veteran Battalions are kept on Foot, only for the Purpose of supporting the Revenue. The Leaders of these can never think of forming a Revolution in Government, as the regular Militia are nu merous, and amply provided with military Stores in their particular Distrects, [sic] besides the grand Magazine at Bern. My Reasons against entering into the list of Senators are many and important. – The forming [and] establishing the military force of this State upon the System already adopted in Therory [sic] is a matter that requires Time, [and] application; and is of essential Conse quence. Should I have it in its present Infancy, I greatly fear what is already done, will prove fruitless This Consideration dwells upon my mind, as I know the present War will not be terminated by the Efficiency of an adiquate [sic] continental Army; but must require Detachments from the Grand Corps de Reserve of the States. Besides which Now is the Time proper for beginning those military Es- tablishments that will hereafter be familiar to the Civil Constitution, and absolutely requisite for external Defence: Should an Attack be made in this quarter, infinite would be my Happin ness in finding the Utility of a favorite System. The present Administration have met in Con vention, according to former Ussage [sic]; applauded each other, and prepared a Prox[y]. I had the Honor of being with them, [and] objected to Messrs. Ellery and Marchant at having been too long in Congress already for the public Good, as Cabals [and]c. had been formed there, of [End Page 2] Which they must bear a part. The Goodness of the Men, extolled by those they flattered, was a suffi- cient Answer, [and] they graciously proffer'ed a Sacri- fice of poor Collins to make Way for their Opposer; And notwithstanding my Refusals have put me in the Prox, to grace the Heel of their new tryum phal [sic] Entry into political Existence. – The People at large are uneasy, and threaten an Opposition; Should it take Place, I shall join them, and may take a Seat in Congress the second part of the Campaign; The first I cannot, for Reasons already alledged [sic]. – Whatever may be the Event, I shall not fail to acquaint you; But should my Fate be such as to enter the List of Senators, my Appli cation to Business will be unremitted, when the Ob- jects shall be important. – Congress, I fully agree, seem totally inadequate to the great Concerns of their Appointment. When they demand the different Contingents of Men or Money, or other Supplies, they do it in so formal, so indiffe rent, and so careless a manner, that the respective Legislatures are led to imagine they intend only to be refused. The Vigor of Exertions ever lessens from the Source to the remotest Branches; And if Congress only exhibit an empty parade, an imaginary deceitful Shew, to obtain better Terms of Peace, with out expecting repeated Campaigns well may the States individually recline, at Ease, resolve to com- ply with their Requisitions; and, in resolving dissolve themselves into perfect Nihility. - This State have [has] voted to furnish their quota of Troops and Proportion of Supplies, and have opened the Treasury. – An Airy Phantom! The mere rever bertation of a greater Echo! – The Plan for raising Magazines in the different States, is excellent, foun ded in the most [?]righteous Policy, and would be attended with the most salutary Effects, was it en [End Page 3] Enforced by Congress, and prosecuted by the States with Suitable Energy; But when the whole Head is sick, the whole Heart is faint! – However this is the only Meathod [sic] that will keep an Army in the Field; [and] without that, we must be miserable indeed. – I think there is no Reason to apprehend great Reinforcements from Britain this Campaign. It is our Duty therefore to defend the Southern States, and dislodge the Enemy from the Eastern. Uncertain is the Fate of Europe. Whatever Alliances may be formed, America will be a capital Object, and the Appearence [sic] she makes, after so long and unequal a Struggle, in the belligerent World, will greatly influence the Powers at War, whether for, or against the House of Bourbon. – Should the Flames of Discord extend in Europe, Great Britain will probably be reinforced by the Naval Force of the three Northern Powers, will while Holland will join in the opposite Scale. My Reasons for this Conjecture are too numerous to be now explained; However, should this be the Case, all the Continental Powers, with Italy [and] the Porte will add to the Scenes of Desolation, by numerous Armies in the Field, “While the Green, will become one Red”. How important therefore it is for these States to exert themselves, to the utmost Stretch of their Abilities, every sensible Politician will readily perceive. - Mrs. Varnum is well, [and] joins me in our best Wishes for Mrs. Greene and yourself, congra- tulations on the Pleasure of your late Increase [if it is a Pleasure; [and] Mrs. Greene's Happy Recovery. I am in perfect Esteem, your very obd.t svt. [obedient servant] Major Genl. [General] Greene - JM [James Mitchell] Varnum [Endorsed in margin:] Genl. [General] Varnum 26 March 1780 [End Page 4]
  • Image 01
    [James Mitchell Varnum to Nathanael Greene March 26, 1780 [RvW Box 1 Folder 26; MSS. – A.L.S.]] Providence 26th March, 1780 Sir – Your Favors of February 10th, and 17th last have been received; but no Inclosures, as yet, from Virginia, respecting the Prize Caroline; However, the day of Grace is not yet pass'd, as by a deep Finesse in Politicks, the present March Term of the Superior Court, is carried into September next, altho' Several Coup's de main have been play'd off to prevent it - Your Ideas of the British Militia Establishment correspond with mine, so far as they are applicable to a monarchical Government. In a Confediration [sic] of democratical States, animated with the Feelings of Equality, almost to Licentiousness, you must, I am persuaded, be convinced that Freemen will not submit to a Distinction of Orders so ma terial as that you prefer. But, could I decide in adopting the best military Establishment, the Swit- zerland should be considered as infinitely superior to all others. That was dictated by Necessity, and found, by long Experience, absolutely perfect. Such Restrictions notwithstanding, could not there have been endured, but from the particular Situation and Circumstances of the Cantons, surrounded by potent Nations. Poor in themselves, cultivating a Soil of uncommon Sterility, prizing Liberty, con temning Affluence with Chains, they relied upon their Defiles and their Establishment for Defence. Hence it is that they compose their regular Militia of the one Third of all their fencible Men, constituting the Re mainder as a Corps de Reserve, for supplying all Deficiencies by Draft, and even taking the Field occa sionally when the first may be incapable of preven[ting] [End Page 1] Preventing an Enemy from penetrating into their Country. – Their Finances are such that their regular, veteran Battalions are kept on Foot, only for the Purpose of supporting the Revenue. The Leaders of these can never think of forming a Revolution in Government, as the regular Militia are nu merous, and amply provided with military Stores in their particular Distrects, [sic] besides the grand Magazine at Bern. My Reasons against entering into the list of Senators are many and important. – The forming [and] establishing the military force of this State upon the System already adopted in Therory [sic] is a matter that requires Time, [and] application; and is of essential Conse quence. Should I have it in its present Infancy, I greatly fear what is already done, will prove fruitless This Consideration dwells upon my mind, as I know the present War will not be terminated by the Efficiency of an adiquate [sic] continental Army; but must require Detachments from the Grand Corps de Reserve of the States. Besides which Now is the Time proper for beginning those military Es- tablishments that will hereafter be familiar to the Civil Constitution, and absolutely requisite for external Defence: Should an Attack be made in this quarter, infinite would be my Happin ness in finding the Utility of a favorite System. The present Administration have met in Con vention, according to former Ussage [sic]; applauded each other, and prepared a Prox[y]. I had the Honor of being with them, [and] objected to Messrs. Ellery and Marchant at having been too long in Congress already for the public Good, as Cabals [and]c. had been formed there, of [End Page 2] Which they must bear a part. The Goodness of the Men, extolled by those they flattered, was a suffi- cient Answer, [and] they graciously proffer'ed a Sacri- fice of poor Collins to make Way for their Opposer; And notwithstanding my Refusals have put me in the Prox, to grace the Heel of their new tryum phal [sic] Entry into political Existence. – The People at large are uneasy, and threaten an Opposition; Should it take Place, I shall join them, and may take a Seat in Congress the second part of the Campaign; The first I cannot, for Reasons already alledged [sic]. – Whatever may be the Event, I shall not fail to acquaint you; But should my Fate be such as to enter the List of Senators, my Appli cation to Business will be unremitted, when the Ob- jects shall be important. – Congress, I fully agree, seem totally inadequate to the great Concerns of their Appointment. When they demand the different Contingents of Men or Money, or other Supplies, they do it in so formal, so indiffe rent, and so careless a manner, that the respective Legislatures are led to imagine they intend only to be refused. The Vigor of Exertions ever lessens from the Source to the remotest Branches; And if Congress only exhibit an empty parade, an imaginary deceitful Shew, to obtain better Terms of Peace, with out expecting repeated Campaigns well may the States individually recline, at Ease, resolve to com- ply with their Requisitions; and, in resolving dissolve themselves into perfect Nihility. - This State have [has] voted to furnish their quota of Troops and Proportion of Supplies, and have opened the Treasury. – An Airy Phantom! The mere rever bertation of a greater Echo! – The Plan for raising Magazines in the different States, is excellent, foun ded in the most [?]righteous Policy, and would be attended with the most salutary Effects, was it en [End Page 3] Enforced by Congress, and prosecuted by the States with Suitable Energy; But when the whole Head is sick, the whole Heart is faint! – However this is the only Meathod [sic] that will keep an Army in the Field; [and] without that, we must be miserable indeed. – I think there is no Reason to apprehend great Reinforcements from Britain this Campaign. It is our Duty therefore to defend the Southern States, and dislodge the Enemy from the Eastern. Uncertain is the Fate of Europe. Whatever Alliances may be formed, America will be a capital Object, and the Appearence [sic] she makes, after so long and unequal a Struggle, in the belligerent World, will greatly influence the Powers at War, whether for, or against the House of Bourbon. – Should the Flames of Discord extend in Europe, Great Britain will probably be reinforced by the Naval Force of the three Northern Powers, will while Holland will join in the opposite Scale. My Reasons for this Conjecture are too numerous to be now explained; However, should this be the Case, all the Continental Powers, with Italy [and] the Porte will add to the Scenes of Desolation, by numerous Armies in the Field, “While the Green, will become one Red”. How important therefore it is for these States to exert themselves, to the utmost Stretch of their Abilities, every sensible Politician will readily perceive. - Mrs. Varnum is well, [and] joins me in our best Wishes for Mrs. Greene and yourself, congra- tulations on the Pleasure of your late Increase [if it is a Pleasure; [and] Mrs. Greene's Happy Recovery. I am in perfect Esteem, your very obd.t svt. [obedient servant] Major Genl. [General] Greene - JM [James Mitchell] Varnum [Endorsed in margin:] Genl. [General] Varnum 26 March 1780 [End Page 4]
  • Image 01
    [James Mitchell Varnum to Nathanael Greene March 26, 1780 [RvW Box 1 Folder 26; MSS. – A.L.S.]] Providence 26th March, 1780 Sir – Your Favors of February 10th, and 17th last have been received; but no Inclosures, as yet, from Virginia, respecting the Prize Caroline; However, the day of Grace is not yet pass'd, as by a deep Finesse in Politicks, the present March Term of the Superior Court, is carried into September next, altho' Several Coup's de main have been play'd off to prevent it - Your Ideas of the British Militia Establishment correspond with mine, so far as they are applicable to a monarchical Government. In a Confediration [sic] of democratical States, animated with the Feelings of Equality, almost to Licentiousness, you must, I am persuaded, be convinced that Freemen will not submit to a Distinction of Orders so ma terial as that you prefer. But, could I decide in adopting the best military Establishment, the Swit- zerland should be considered as infinitely superior to all others. That was dictated by Necessity, and found, by long Experience, absolutely perfect. Such Restrictions notwithstanding, could not there have been endured, but from the particular Situation and Circumstances of the Cantons, surrounded by potent Nations. Poor in themselves, cultivating a Soil of uncommon Sterility, prizing Liberty, con temning Affluence with Chains, they relied upon their Defiles and their Establishment for Defence. Hence it is that they compose their regular Militia of the one Third of all their fencible Men, constituting the Re mainder as a Corps de Reserve, for supplying all Deficiencies by Draft, and even taking the Field occa sionally when the first may be incapable of preven[ting] [End Page 1] Preventing an Enemy from penetrating into their Country. – Their Finances are such that their regular, veteran Battalions are kept on Foot, only for the Purpose of supporting the Revenue. The Leaders of these can never think of forming a Revolution in Government, as the regular Militia are nu merous, and amply provided with military Stores in their particular Distrects, [sic] besides the grand Magazine at Bern. My Reasons against entering into the list of Senators are many and important. – The forming [and] establishing the military force of this State upon the System already adopted in Therory [sic] is a matter that requires Time, [and] application; and is of essential Conse quence. Should I have it in its present Infancy, I greatly fear what is already done, will prove fruitless This Consideration dwells upon my mind, as I know the present War will not be terminated by the Efficiency of an adiquate [sic] continental Army; but must require Detachments from the Grand Corps de Reserve of the States. Besides which Now is the Time proper for beginning those military Es- tablishments that will hereafter be familiar to the Civil Constitution, and absolutely requisite for external Defence: Should an Attack be made in this quarter, infinite would be my Happin ness in finding the Utility of a favorite System. The present Administration have met in Con vention, according to former Ussage [sic]; applauded each other, and prepared a Prox[y]. I had the Honor of being with them, [and] objected to Messrs. Ellery and Marchant at having been too long in Congress already for the public Good, as Cabals [and]c. had been formed there, of [End Page 2] Which they must bear a part. The Goodness of the Men, extolled by those they flattered, was a suffi- cient Answer, [and] they graciously proffer'ed a Sacri- fice of poor Collins to make Way for their Opposer; And notwithstanding my Refusals have put me in the Prox, to grace the Heel of their new tryum phal [sic] Entry into political Existence. – The People at large are uneasy, and threaten an Opposition; Should it take Place, I shall join them, and may take a Seat in Congress the second part of the Campaign; The first I cannot, for Reasons already alledged [sic]. – Whatever may be the Event, I shall not fail to acquaint you; But should my Fate be such as to enter the List of Senators, my Appli cation to Business will be unremitted, when the Ob- jects shall be important. – Congress, I fully agree, seem totally inadequate to the great Concerns of their Appointment. When they demand the different Contingents of Men or Money, or other Supplies, they do it in so formal, so indiffe rent, and so careless a manner, that the respective Legislatures are led to imagine they intend only to be refused. The Vigor of Exertions ever lessens from the Source to the remotest Branches; And if Congress only exhibit an empty parade, an imaginary deceitful Shew, to obtain better Terms of Peace, with out expecting repeated Campaigns well may the States individually recline, at Ease, resolve to com- ply with their Requisitions; and, in resolving dissolve themselves into perfect Nihility. - This State have [has] voted to furnish their quota of Troops and Proportion of Supplies, and have opened the Treasury. – An Airy Phantom! The mere rever bertation of a greater Echo! – The Plan for raising Magazines in the different States, is excellent, foun ded in the most [?]righteous Policy, and would be attended with the most salutary Effects, was it en [End Page 3] Enforced by Congress, and prosecuted by the States with Suitable Energy; But when the whole Head is sick, the whole Heart is faint! – However this is the only Meathod [sic] that will keep an Army in the Field; [and] without that, we must be miserable indeed. – I think there is no Reason to apprehend great Reinforcements from Britain this Campaign. It is our Duty therefore to defend the Southern States, and dislodge the Enemy from the Eastern. Uncertain is the Fate of Europe. Whatever Alliances may be formed, America will be a capital Object, and the Appearence [sic] she makes, after so long and unequal a Struggle, in the belligerent World, will greatly influence the Powers at War, whether for, or against the House of Bourbon. – Should the Flames of Discord extend in Europe, Great Britain will probably be reinforced by the Naval Force of the three Northern Powers, will while Holland will join in the opposite Scale. My Reasons for this Conjecture are too numerous to be now explained; However, should this be the Case, all the Continental Powers, with Italy [and] the Porte will add to the Scenes of Desolation, by numerous Armies in the Field, “While the Green, will become one Red”. How important therefore it is for these States to exert themselves, to the utmost Stretch of their Abilities, every sensible Politician will readily perceive. - Mrs. Varnum is well, [and] joins me in our best Wishes for Mrs. Greene and yourself, congra- tulations on the Pleasure of your late Increase [if it is a Pleasure; [and] Mrs. Greene's Happy Recovery. I am in perfect Esteem, your very obd.t svt. [obedient servant] Major Genl. [General] Greene - JM [James Mitchell] Varnum [Endorsed in margin:] Genl. [General] Varnum 26 March 1780 [End Page 4]
Title:
Letter from James Mitchell Varnum to Nathanael Greene
Creator:
Varnum, James M. (James Mitchell), 1748-1789
Date:
1780-03-26
Description:
Letter from James Mitchell Varnum to Nathanael Greene regarding general politics and how he believes the country should be organized after the war. Varnum goes on to criticize Congress and discuss the lack of men and funds to continue much longer in the war.
Collection:
Charleston Museum Collection of Revolutionary War Letters
Contributing Institution:
The Charleston Museum Archives
Media Type:
Manuscripts
Personal or Corporate Subject:
Greene, Nathanael, 1742-1786--Correspondence, Greene, Nathanael, 1742-1786--Military service, Greene, Nathanael, 1742-1786--Military leadership, Greene, Nathanael, 1742-1786
Topical Subject:
War, armed forces, and society
Geographic Subject:
United States--History--Revolution, 1775-1783, United States--History--Revolution, 1775-1783--American forces, Williamsburg County (S.C.), Savannah River (Ga. and S.C.)
S.C. County:
Charleston County (S.C.)
Internet Media Type:
image/jpeg
Digitization Specifications:
600 ppi, 24-bit depth, color, Epson Expression 10000XL, Archival Masters are tiffs.
Copyright Status Statement:
Public domain.
Access Information:
For more information contact The Charleston Museum, 360 Meeting Street, Charleston, SC 29403.