Letter from Mann Page, Jr. to John Page

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    [Mann Page, Jr. to John Page April 15, 1777 [RvW Box 1 Folder 22; MSS. – A.L.S.]] Dear Brother I have for some time past been less punctual in writing to you than I intended, oweing [sic], first to the Small Pox [and] then to my being detained three Weeks on my Way from Baltimore to this Place by my Wife's Sickness. I am sorry to hear the recruiting Business goes on slowly in Virginia, it is the Case throughout the Continent. We have no Army hardly, on which Account we are losing the most favourable [sic] Oppor - -tunity, that could have offered, of destroying the Force which the Enemy now have in America. I wrote to you by Mr. Clarkson, [and] then gave it as my Opinion, that the Enemy would not attack this City, but since that, several Pieces of Information have induced me to give up that Opinion. In - - deed there is at this time a considerable Fleet in Delaware Bay, which has set every Body to work to prevent their coming up. If the Citizens would exert themselves, all would be safe; but Toryism, Fear [and] Avarice have totally obliterated every virtuous Principle. The General thinks that when they do attack Phila.a their land Army will cooperate with their Fleet, but that their present Design is only to cut off the Trade of this River. On Saturday last we lost a valuable Ship loaded with military Stores [and] Cloathing [sic] from France. The Captn. fought nobly, [and] at last ran ye ship aground, [and] after puting [sic] the greater Part of the Crew, [and] his Papers on Shore, blew her up, but unfortu - - nately he [and] six of his Crew perished by the Explosion, which happened by the match burning too fast. A small Affair happened on Sunday morning in the Jersey. The Enemy attempted with a considerable Party from Brunswick to surprize [sic] Genl. [General] Lincoln at Bound Brook, which they had nearly effected oweing to the Negligence of a Militia Guard. We lost 2 field Pieces, [and] about twenty five men, most of them Prisoners. The Genl. [General] [and] his men behaved well. The Enemy soon left the town; they lost several men. [End Page 1] We have Accounts from London by the Way of France, dated early in Feby. that Burgoyne with ten thousand British [and] German Troops is to attack Virginia early in the Spring. This I suppose, is a Plan of our good Friend Ld. Dunmore; which I expect will turn out like his other stupid Schemes. Accept our Love, [and] present it to our Sister, I am, dear Brother Your's affectionately Philadelphia Mann Page Jun.r [Junior] April 15th 1777 [End Page 2]
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    [Mann Page, Jr. to John Page April 15, 1777 [RvW Box 1 Folder 22; MSS. – A.L.S.]] Dear Brother I have for some time past been less punctual in writing to you than I intended, oweing [sic], first to the Small Pox [and] then to my being detained three Weeks on my Way from Baltimore to this Place by my Wife's Sickness. I am sorry to hear the recruiting Business goes on slowly in Virginia, it is the Case throughout the Continent. We have no Army hardly, on which Account we are losing the most favourable [sic] Oppor - -tunity, that could have offered, of destroying the Force which the Enemy now have in America. I wrote to you by Mr. Clarkson, [and] then gave it as my Opinion, that the Enemy would not attack this City, but since that, several Pieces of Information have induced me to give up that Opinion. In - - deed there is at this time a considerable Fleet in Delaware Bay, which has set every Body to work to prevent their coming up. If the Citizens would exert themselves, all would be safe; but Toryism, Fear [and] Avarice have totally obliterated every virtuous Principle. The General thinks that when they do attack Phila.a their land Army will cooperate with their Fleet, but that their present Design is only to cut off the Trade of this River. On Saturday last we lost a valuable Ship loaded with military Stores [and] Cloathing [sic] from France. The Captn. fought nobly, [and] at last ran ye ship aground, [and] after puting [sic] the greater Part of the Crew, [and] his Papers on Shore, blew her up, but unfortu - - nately he [and] six of his Crew perished by the Explosion, which happened by the match burning too fast. A small Affair happened on Sunday morning in the Jersey. The Enemy attempted with a considerable Party from Brunswick to surprize [sic] Genl. [General] Lincoln at Bound Brook, which they had nearly effected oweing to the Negligence of a Militia Guard. We lost 2 field Pieces, [and] about twenty five men, most of them Prisoners. The Genl. [General] [and] his men behaved well. The Enemy soon left the town; they lost several men. [End Page 1] We have Accounts from London by the Way of France, dated early in Feby. that Burgoyne with ten thousand British [and] German Troops is to attack Virginia early in the Spring. This I suppose, is a Plan of our good Friend Ld. Dunmore; which I expect will turn out like his other stupid Schemes. Accept our Love, [and] present it to our Sister, I am, dear Brother Your's affectionately Philadelphia Mann Page Jun.r [Junior] April 15th 1777 [End Page 2]
Title:
Letter from Mann Page, Jr. to John Page
Creator:
Page, Mann, 1749-1781
Date:
1777-04-15
Description:
Letter from Mann Page, Jr. to John Page appraising his brother of his bout with smallpox, preparation for an enemy invasion in Philadelphia, the British blocking of trade, the loss of a ship with her captain and supplies, and reporting the expected renewal of British forces in the spring.
Collection:
Charleston Museum Collection of Revolutionary War Letters
Contributing Institution:
The Charleston Museum Archives
Media Type:
Manuscripts
Personal or Corporate Subject:
Page, John, 1744-1808--Correspondence, Page, John, 1744-1808
Topical Subject:
War, armed forces, and society
Geographic Subject:
United States--History--Revolution, 1775-1783, United States--History--Revolution, 1775-1783--American forces
S.C. County:
Charleston County (S.C.)
Internet Media Type:
image/jpeg
Digitization Specifications:
600 ppi, 24-bit depth, color, Epson Expression 10000XL, Archival Masters are tiffs.
Copyright Status Statement:
Public domain.
Access Information:
For more information contact The Charleston Museum, 360 Meeting Street, Charleston, SC 29403.