Letter from Robert Lawson to Nathanael Greene

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    [Robert Lawson to Nathanael Greene May 14, 1781 [RvW Box 1 Folder 12; MSS. – A.L.S.]] Pr. Edward May 14th 1781 Dr. General, You have no doubt expected the Militia from this State before this. In the first place they have in general manifested an uncommon reluctance in marching to your Army – arising I apprehind [sic] from two causes – First the season of the Year, [and] secondly the lengthy march into a hot [and] disagreeable Country, which climate of which they entertain horrid ideas of. From the movements of Cornwallis [and] Phillips, it appears certain, that they mean to make this State the Scene of the Southern war this Campaign: The Executive impriss'd [sic] with this idea, have order'd me to stay here, together with such militia order'd to join you, [and] who have not actually march'd. I have reason to imagine that there are now at Salisbury upwards of 500 men. Colo. [Colonel] Cocke who was in Gl. Stevens Brigade is order'd by me to that place [End Page 1] place to arrange the militia there collected, [and] await your orders. I have no doubt but that you'll direct your course this way, should Cornwallis move into This State – which seems not to be doubted at present. Should the Event prove other wise, the militia first order'd will join you with all possible dispatch. I must beg you'll do me the honor in the mean time, of giving me such orders as you may see cause, which shall be obey'd with alacrity. The Marquiss [sic] is on the North side of James River, with the whole of the Troops collected in this State. The Enemy are on the South Side, at liberty to go where they please, [and] are doing all possible injury to our the unfortunate [and] defenceless [sic] Inhabitants who fall in their way – Indeed I cannot avoid expressing my ardent wish, that you were with your Troops in this State. I am confident it would change the face of things greatly in our favor – and it is not only mine, but the [End Page 2] the anxious wish of Virga. that this should be the case. The Enemy have already done us inexprissible [sic] Injury, by burning our Tobacco, [and] taking [and] destroying our Magazines of Provisions collected at different places on James [and] Appomatox [Appomattox] Rivers. The militia are order'd to the amount of about 1000 to rendezvous at the Court House of this County; to join the Mar- quiss in opposing the progress of the Enemy in this State, or to march to you as exigencies may require [ink blot] I beg again your particular instruc -tions – and I have the honor to be with the highest respect, Sir Your most obed.t humble Serv.t [obedient humble Servant] Ro: Lawson B. G.enl. [Robert Lawson Brigadier General] [End Page 3] [Addressed:] On public service The Honble [Honorable] Major General Greene To be forwarded by Express from Salisbury. Head Quarters. [seal] [Endorsed: upside down] from Genl. [General] Lawson May 14th. 1781 - [End Page 4]
  • Image 01
    [Robert Lawson to Nathanael Greene May 14, 1781 [RvW Box 1 Folder 12; MSS. – A.L.S.]] Pr. Edward May 14th 1781 Dr. General, You have no doubt expected the Militia from this State before this. In the first place they have in general manifested an uncommon reluctance in marching to your Army – arising I apprehind [sic] from two causes – First the season of the Year, [and] secondly the lengthy march into a hot [and] disagreeable Country, which climate of which they entertain horrid ideas of. From the movements of Cornwallis [and] Phillips, it appears certain, that they mean to make this State the Scene of the Southern war this Campaign: The Executive impriss'd [sic] with this idea, have order'd me to stay here, together with such militia order'd to join you, [and] who have not actually march'd. I have reason to imagine that there are now at Salisbury upwards of 500 men. Colo. [Colonel] Cocke who was in Gl. Stevens Brigade is order'd by me to that place [End Page 1] place to arrange the militia there collected, [and] await your orders. I have no doubt but that you'll direct your course this way, should Cornwallis move into This State – which seems not to be doubted at present. Should the Event prove other wise, the militia first order'd will join you with all possible dispatch. I must beg you'll do me the honor in the mean time, of giving me such orders as you may see cause, which shall be obey'd with alacrity. The Marquiss [sic] is on the North side of James River, with the whole of the Troops collected in this State. The Enemy are on the South Side, at liberty to go where they please, [and] are doing all possible injury to our the unfortunate [and] defenceless [sic] Inhabitants who fall in their way – Indeed I cannot avoid expressing my ardent wish, that you were with your Troops in this State. I am confident it would change the face of things greatly in our favor – and it is not only mine, but the [End Page 2] the anxious wish of Virga. that this should be the case. The Enemy have already done us inexprissible [sic] Injury, by burning our Tobacco, [and] taking [and] destroying our Magazines of Provisions collected at different places on James [and] Appomatox [Appomattox] Rivers. The militia are order'd to the amount of about 1000 to rendezvous at the Court House of this County; to join the Mar- quiss in opposing the progress of the Enemy in this State, or to march to you as exigencies may require [ink blot] I beg again your particular instruc -tions – and I have the honor to be with the highest respect, Sir Your most obed.t humble Serv.t [obedient humble Servant] Ro: Lawson B. G.enl. [Robert Lawson Brigadier General] [End Page 3] [Addressed:] On public service The Honble [Honorable] Major General Greene To be forwarded by Express from Salisbury. Head Quarters. [seal] [Endorsed: upside down] from Genl. [General] Lawson May 14th. 1781 - [End Page 4]
  • Image 01
    [Robert Lawson to Nathanael Greene May 14, 1781 [RvW Box 1 Folder 12; MSS. – A.L.S.]] Pr. Edward May 14th 1781 Dr. General, You have no doubt expected the Militia from this State before this. In the first place they have in general manifested an uncommon reluctance in marching to your Army – arising I apprehind [sic] from two causes – First the season of the Year, [and] secondly the lengthy march into a hot [and] disagreeable Country, which climate of which they entertain horrid ideas of. From the movements of Cornwallis [and] Phillips, it appears certain, that they mean to make this State the Scene of the Southern war this Campaign: The Executive impriss'd [sic] with this idea, have order'd me to stay here, together with such militia order'd to join you, [and] who have not actually march'd. I have reason to imagine that there are now at Salisbury upwards of 500 men. Colo. [Colonel] Cocke who was in Gl. Stevens Brigade is order'd by me to that place [End Page 1] place to arrange the militia there collected, [and] await your orders. I have no doubt but that you'll direct your course this way, should Cornwallis move into This State – which seems not to be doubted at present. Should the Event prove other wise, the militia first order'd will join you with all possible dispatch. I must beg you'll do me the honor in the mean time, of giving me such orders as you may see cause, which shall be obey'd with alacrity. The Marquiss [sic] is on the North side of James River, with the whole of the Troops collected in this State. The Enemy are on the South Side, at liberty to go where they please, [and] are doing all possible injury to our the unfortunate [and] defenceless [sic] Inhabitants who fall in their way – Indeed I cannot avoid expressing my ardent wish, that you were with your Troops in this State. I am confident it would change the face of things greatly in our favor – and it is not only mine, but the [End Page 2] the anxious wish of Virga. that this should be the case. The Enemy have already done us inexprissible [sic] Injury, by burning our Tobacco, [and] taking [and] destroying our Magazines of Provisions collected at different places on James [and] Appomatox [Appomattox] Rivers. The militia are order'd to the amount of about 1000 to rendezvous at the Court House of this County; to join the Mar- quiss in opposing the progress of the Enemy in this State, or to march to you as exigencies may require [ink blot] I beg again your particular instruc -tions – and I have the honor to be with the highest respect, Sir Your most obed.t humble Serv.t [obedient humble Servant] Ro: Lawson B. G.enl. [Robert Lawson Brigadier General] [End Page 3] [Addressed:] On public service The Honble [Honorable] Major General Greene To be forwarded by Express from Salisbury. Head Quarters. [seal] [Endorsed: upside down] from Genl. [General] Lawson May 14th. 1781 - [End Page 4]
  • Image 01
    [Robert Lawson to Nathanael Greene May 14, 1781 [RvW Box 1 Folder 12; MSS. – A.L.S.]] Pr. Edward May 14th 1781 Dr. General, You have no doubt expected the Militia from this State before this. In the first place they have in general manifested an uncommon reluctance in marching to your Army – arising I apprehind [sic] from two causes – First the season of the Year, [and] secondly the lengthy march into a hot [and] disagreeable Country, which climate of which they entertain horrid ideas of. From the movements of Cornwallis [and] Phillips, it appears certain, that they mean to make this State the Scene of the Southern war this Campaign: The Executive impriss'd [sic] with this idea, have order'd me to stay here, together with such militia order'd to join you, [and] who have not actually march'd. I have reason to imagine that there are now at Salisbury upwards of 500 men. Colo. [Colonel] Cocke who was in Gl. Stevens Brigade is order'd by me to that place [End Page 1] place to arrange the militia there collected, [and] await your orders. I have no doubt but that you'll direct your course this way, should Cornwallis move into This State – which seems not to be doubted at present. Should the Event prove other wise, the militia first order'd will join you with all possible dispatch. I must beg you'll do me the honor in the mean time, of giving me such orders as you may see cause, which shall be obey'd with alacrity. The Marquiss [sic] is on the North side of James River, with the whole of the Troops collected in this State. The Enemy are on the South Side, at liberty to go where they please, [and] are doing all possible injury to our the unfortunate [and] defenceless [sic] Inhabitants who fall in their way – Indeed I cannot avoid expressing my ardent wish, that you were with your Troops in this State. I am confident it would change the face of things greatly in our favor – and it is not only mine, but the [End Page 2] the anxious wish of Virga. that this should be the case. The Enemy have already done us inexprissible [sic] Injury, by burning our Tobacco, [and] taking [and] destroying our Magazines of Provisions collected at different places on James [and] Appomatox [Appomattox] Rivers. The militia are order'd to the amount of about 1000 to rendezvous at the Court House of this County; to join the Mar- quiss in opposing the progress of the Enemy in this State, or to march to you as exigencies may require [ink blot] I beg again your particular instruc -tions – and I have the honor to be with the highest respect, Sir Your most obed.t humble Serv.t [obedient humble Servant] Ro: Lawson B. G.enl. [Robert Lawson Brigadier General] [End Page 3] [Addressed:] On public service The Honble [Honorable] Major General Greene To be forwarded by Express from Salisbury. Head Quarters. [seal] [Endorsed: upside down] from Genl. [General] Lawson May 14th. 1781 - [End Page 4]
Title:
Letter from Robert Lawson to Nathanael Greene
Creator:
Lawson, Robert
Date:
1781-05-14
Description:
Letter from Robert Lawson to Nathanael Greene regarding the reluctance of the militia under is command to march further south and also of the hindrance of their progress by the movements of Cornwallis and Phillips. Brigadier General Lawson also details the destruction the British are leaving in their wake, burning tobacco, destroying supplies, etc., and begs the further instructions from Major General Greene.
Collection:
Charleston Museum Collection of Revolutionary War Letters
Contributing Institution:
The Charleston Museum Archives
Media Type:
Manuscripts
Personal or Corporate Subject:
Greene, Nathanael, 1742-1786--Correspondence, Greene, Nathanael, 1742-1786--Military service, Greene, Nathanael, 1742-1786--Military leadership, Greene, Nathanael, 1742-1786
Topical Subject:
War, armed forces, and society
Geographic Subject:
United States--History--Revolution, 1775-1783, United States--History--Revolution, 1775-1783--American forces
S.C. County:
Charleston County (S.C.)
Internet Media Type:
image/jpeg
Digitization Specifications:
600 ppi, 24-bit depth, color, Epson Expression 10000XL, Archival Masters are tiffs.
Copyright Status Statement:
Public domain.
Access Information:
For more information contact The Charleston Museum, 360 Meeting Street, Charleston, SC 29403.