Letter from John Laurens to Francis Kinloch

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    [John Laurens to Francis Kinloch August 23, 1774 [RvW Box 1, Folder 1 MSS. – A.L.S.]] Dear Kinloch After a pleasant Ride through a very fine Part of France, I arrived in London on the 7th of this month, but figure to yourself my Grief and Mortification, at finding that my Father had set out that day fortnight in order to meet me. I knew how great his Anxiety and Uneasiness would be on my Account, and therefore left Town the next day, and tra- -velling without intermission, reached the Fauxbourg St. Germain on the 11th at day break, where I had the happiness of relieving my Good Father from much Concern - we staid a day or two at Paris where we had the pleasure of seeing Mrs. Blake, who enquired very kindly after you. R. Izard jun.r, Grimke [and] ca. and I am but just returned from my new Journey - let this apolo- -gize for my not writing to you sooner. I waited on your Friend Mr. Boone, And as he was out of town, I left your Letter with a Card – had I not been afraid of detaining any longer, what can never fly too quick or come too often to him good news from you, I should have had the pleasure of deli- -vering the Letter to him myself. If my Letter is a little confused, dont be surpriz'd at it, for I am quite like a Creature in new World, and shall be for some time in an unsettled State. I am glad however to inform you that I shall not have Lod- -gings in the Temple as I at first thought, but in some genteel private Family. the Noise, the Cries the Smoak [sic] and Dust of this vast City, make me sometimes wish myself back at Paquis, I have another Reason too, for wish -ing myself there, I dont know when I shall get into such a valuable Set of Acquaintance as I have left – [End Page 1] but perhaps for the present, the fewer Acquaintance I have, the better it will be for me. I am confirm'd in the opinion that you and I both had at Geneve [sic] respecting our young Countrymen, by what I have seen and heard since my Arrival here – I can write you nothing satisfactory as yet of American Affairs, the English Soldiers it is said begin to desert, the colonist are forming into Committees to consult what is to be done in their present Circumstances, the Carolinians are to send Rice and other necessaries for the Relief of their distress'd Brethren at Boston. A General Congress will be held at Philadelphia or New York, the Deputies to be sent there by the Province of SoCarolina, are Henry Middle- -ton, T. Lynch, C. Gadsden, J. Rutledge, and Edward Rutledge the Young Man who lately went over, and who has already acquir'd a great degree of Celebrity. Tell Lord Lumley that I hope he continues a good Friend to the Americans, be so kind as to present my best Compliments to him Mr. Clayson, Moore the Duke and Harvey. I wish them all a great deal of Happiness and Pleasure at Geneve – it grows so late that I must bid you Adieu, kiss all the pretty Genevoises for me and dont delay to write to your affectionate John Laurens. Fludyer Street Westminster – 23d August 1774 Direct to me at the Carolina Coffee House. [End Page 2]
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    [John Laurens to Francis Kinloch August 23, 1774 [RvW Box 1, Folder 1 MSS. – A.L.S.]] Dear Kinloch After a pleasant Ride through a very fine Part of France, I arrived in London on the 7th of this month, but figure to yourself my Grief and Mortification, at finding that my Father had set out that day fortnight in order to meet me. I knew how great his Anxiety and Uneasiness would be on my Account, and therefore left Town the next day, and tra- -velling without intermission, reached the Fauxbourg St. Germain on the 11th at day break, where I had the happiness of relieving my Good Father from much Concern - we staid a day or two at Paris where we had the pleasure of seeing Mrs. Blake, who enquired very kindly after you. R. Izard jun.r, Grimke [and] ca. and I am but just returned from my new Journey - let this apolo- -gize for my not writing to you sooner. I waited on your Friend Mr. Boone, And as he was out of town, I left your Letter with a Card – had I not been afraid of detaining any longer, what can never fly too quick or come too often to him good news from you, I should have had the pleasure of deli- -vering the Letter to him myself. If my Letter is a little confused, dont be surpriz'd at it, for I am quite like a Creature in new World, and shall be for some time in an unsettled State. I am glad however to inform you that I shall not have Lod- -gings in the Temple as I at first thought, but in some genteel private Family. the Noise, the Cries the Smoak [sic] and Dust of this vast City, make me sometimes wish myself back at Paquis, I have another Reason too, for wish -ing myself there, I dont know when I shall get into such a valuable Set of Acquaintance as I have left – [End Page 1] but perhaps for the present, the fewer Acquaintance I have, the better it will be for me. I am confirm'd in the opinion that you and I both had at Geneve [sic] respecting our young Countrymen, by what I have seen and heard since my Arrival here – I can write you nothing satisfactory as yet of American Affairs, the English Soldiers it is said begin to desert, the colonist are forming into Committees to consult what is to be done in their present Circumstances, the Carolinians are to send Rice and other necessaries for the Relief of their distress'd Brethren at Boston. A General Congress will be held at Philadelphia or New York, the Deputies to be sent there by the Province of SoCarolina, are Henry Middle- -ton, T. Lynch, C. Gadsden, J. Rutledge, and Edward Rutledge the Young Man who lately went over, and who has already acquir'd a great degree of Celebrity. Tell Lord Lumley that I hope he continues a good Friend to the Americans, be so kind as to present my best Compliments to him Mr. Clayson, Moore the Duke and Harvey. I wish them all a great deal of Happiness and Pleasure at Geneve – it grows so late that I must bid you Adieu, kiss all the pretty Genevoises for me and dont delay to write to your affectionate John Laurens. Fludyer Street Westminster – 23d August 1774 Direct to me at the Carolina Coffee House. [End Page 2]
Title:
Letter from John Laurens to Francis Kinloch
Creator:
Laurens, John, 1754-1782
Date:
1774-08-23
Description:
Letter from John Laurens to Francis Kinloch regarding foreign travel in Europe and the state of American political affairs. Laurens proceeds to outline the South Carolinian officials who are to attend the General Congress gathering that will soon take place in Philadelphia or New York.
Collection:
Charleston Museum Collection of Revolutionary War Letters
Contributing Institution:
The Charleston Museum Archives
Media Type:
Manuscripts
Personal or Corporate Subject:
Laurens, John, 1754-1782--Correspondence, Laurens, John, 1754-1782, Kinloch, Francis, 1755-1826
Topical Subject:
War, armed forces, and society
Geographic Subject:
United States--History--Revolution, 1775-1783, United States--History--Revolution, 1775-1783--American forces
S.C. County:
Charleston County (S.C.)
Internet Media Type:
image/jpeg
Digitization Specifications:
800 ppi, 24-bit depth, color, Epson Expression 10000XL, Archival Masters are tiffs.
Copyright Status Statement:
Public domain.
Access Information:
For more information contact The Charleston Museum, 360 Meeting Street, Charleston, SC 29403.