095. Samuel Wragg Ferguson to F.R. Barker (Godmother) -- July 10, 1861

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    Manassas Junction July 10th My dear Godmother I hope you have not got tired looking for a letter from me and given up in despair for you have by no means been forgotten but the fact is I don't have many chances of writing as I like, that is, just as the [humour?] takes me and this far most of my letters have been answers to those received by me. Of course you have heard of all my movements as much as they are known from my letters home and to Aunt Bet. I wrote last night to Father since that time nothing of interest has occurred here. Mr. Miles wrote to day to the Secretary of War about Tom but he does not seem to have much hope that he will be able to do much with that slow functionary- During my recent visit to Richmond I called on his friends [End Page 1] The Freelands and was much charmed, with the young ladies particularly. I also saw there Mrs John Singleton and Miss Decker they with some other ladies from Columbia are going to establish themselves at some point near here. for the purpose of looking after the sick and wounded. Culpeper Court House will be the spot selected I believe. At that place we leave large hospitals established when the sick from this Command are daily sent by rail road. they consist principally of measel cases in the Regiments from the rural districts of the South. The Rev Mr Barnwell is with these ladies I met him at Culpeper C.H. looking out for a house as a depot for the good things to be sent from Carolina In Richmond I saw Theodore loking very well. I hope he will soon join us here. [End Page 2] Our pickets captured another of the enemy yesterday but he has not been sent in here yet. President Davis sent on Sunday a letter to Lincoln warning him what he would do in case the crew of the Savannah were dealt harshly with. His messenger returned this morning from Washington, where he had been politely treated by General Scott. The reply of Lincoln will be sent in a day or two. The day that I arrived in Richmond last Saturday, all the prisoners we had there, who had been allowed to go about the city on parole, were arrested and confined in consequence of the accounts received of the trial of the crew of the Savannah, so you see Davis is in earnest and I do not think Lincoln will dare to hang those men. We had a fine rain yesterday, another to day which still continues so we will be rid of [End Page 3] the dust for a while. What does cousin Esther think of our Bishop General. There are several parsons here, captains of Companies. How do you like the house in Church St I believe you went into the country to nurse Fannie on the very day you moved into it. Tell Fannie I will try and write to her very soon I hope that by this time she is well and strong enough to pen me a few lines. Dr Brodie, who lives in the tent with me has retired and I hear many of my neighbors making preparations for turning in. I feel like following their example but have some more writing to do first My dear love to you all Your devoted Godson Sam [End Page 4]
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    Manassas Junction July 10th My dear Godmother I hope you have not got tired looking for a letter from me and given up in despair for you have by no means been forgotten but the fact is I don't have many chances of writing as I like, that is, just as the [humour?] takes me and this far most of my letters have been answers to those received by me. Of course you have heard of all my movements as much as they are known from my letters home and to Aunt Bet. I wrote last night to Father since that time nothing of interest has occurred here. Mr. Miles wrote to day to the Secretary of War about Tom but he does not seem to have much hope that he will be able to do much with that slow functionary- During my recent visit to Richmond I called on his friends [End Page 1] The Freelands and was much charmed, with the young ladies particularly. I also saw there Mrs John Singleton and Miss Decker they with some other ladies from Columbia are going to establish themselves at some point near here. for the purpose of looking after the sick and wounded. Culpeper Court House will be the spot selected I believe. At that place we leave large hospitals established when the sick from this Command are daily sent by rail road. they consist principally of measel cases in the Regiments from the rural districts of the South. The Rev Mr Barnwell is with these ladies I met him at Culpeper C.H. looking out for a house as a depot for the good things to be sent from Carolina In Richmond I saw Theodore loking very well. I hope he will soon join us here. [End Page 2] Our pickets captured another of the enemy yesterday but he has not been sent in here yet. President Davis sent on Sunday a letter to Lincoln warning him what he would do in case the crew of the Savannah were dealt harshly with. His messenger returned this morning from Washington, where he had been politely treated by General Scott. The reply of Lincoln will be sent in a day or two. The day that I arrived in Richmond last Saturday, all the prisoners we had there, who had been allowed to go about the city on parole, were arrested and confined in consequence of the accounts received of the trial of the crew of the Savannah, so you see Davis is in earnest and I do not think Lincoln will dare to hang those men. We had a fine rain yesterday, another to day which still continues so we will be rid of [End Page 3] the dust for a while. What does cousin Esther think of our Bishop General. There are several parsons here, captains of Companies. How do you like the house in Church St I believe you went into the country to nurse Fannie on the very day you moved into it. Tell Fannie I will try and write to her very soon I hope that by this time she is well and strong enough to pen me a few lines. Dr Brodie, who lives in the tent with me has retired and I hear many of my neighbors making preparations for turning in. I feel like following their example but have some more writing to do first My dear love to you all Your devoted Godson Sam [End Page 4]
  • Image 01
    Manassas Junction July 10th My dear Godmother I hope you have not got tired looking for a letter from me and given up in despair for you have by no means been forgotten but the fact is I don't have many chances of writing as I like, that is, just as the [humour?] takes me and this far most of my letters have been answers to those received by me. Of course you have heard of all my movements as much as they are known from my letters home and to Aunt Bet. I wrote last night to Father since that time nothing of interest has occurred here. Mr. Miles wrote to day to the Secretary of War about Tom but he does not seem to have much hope that he will be able to do much with that slow functionary- During my recent visit to Richmond I called on his friends [End Page 1] The Freelands and was much charmed, with the young ladies particularly. I also saw there Mrs John Singleton and Miss Decker they with some other ladies from Columbia are going to establish themselves at some point near here. for the purpose of looking after the sick and wounded. Culpeper Court House will be the spot selected I believe. At that place we leave large hospitals established when the sick from this Command are daily sent by rail road. they consist principally of measel cases in the Regiments from the rural districts of the South. The Rev Mr Barnwell is with these ladies I met him at Culpeper C.H. looking out for a house as a depot for the good things to be sent from Carolina In Richmond I saw Theodore loking very well. I hope he will soon join us here. [End Page 2] Our pickets captured another of the enemy yesterday but he has not been sent in here yet. President Davis sent on Sunday a letter to Lincoln warning him what he would do in case the crew of the Savannah were dealt harshly with. His messenger returned this morning from Washington, where he had been politely treated by General Scott. The reply of Lincoln will be sent in a day or two. The day that I arrived in Richmond last Saturday, all the prisoners we had there, who had been allowed to go about the city on parole, were arrested and confined in consequence of the accounts received of the trial of the crew of the Savannah, so you see Davis is in earnest and I do not think Lincoln will dare to hang those men. We had a fine rain yesterday, another to day which still continues so we will be rid of [End Page 3] the dust for a while. What does cousin Esther think of our Bishop General. There are several parsons here, captains of Companies. How do you like the house in Church St I believe you went into the country to nurse Fannie on the very day you moved into it. Tell Fannie I will try and write to her very soon I hope that by this time she is well and strong enough to pen me a few lines. Dr Brodie, who lives in the tent with me has retired and I hear many of my neighbors making preparations for turning in. I feel like following their example but have some more writing to do first My dear love to you all Your devoted Godson Sam [End Page 4]
  • Image 01
    Manassas Junction July 10th My dear Godmother I hope you have not got tired looking for a letter from me and given up in despair for you have by no means been forgotten but the fact is I don't have many chances of writing as I like, that is, just as the [humour?] takes me and this far most of my letters have been answers to those received by me. Of course you have heard of all my movements as much as they are known from my letters home and to Aunt Bet. I wrote last night to Father since that time nothing of interest has occurred here. Mr. Miles wrote to day to the Secretary of War about Tom but he does not seem to have much hope that he will be able to do much with that slow functionary- During my recent visit to Richmond I called on his friends [End Page 1] The Freelands and was much charmed, with the young ladies particularly. I also saw there Mrs John Singleton and Miss Decker they with some other ladies from Columbia are going to establish themselves at some point near here. for the purpose of looking after the sick and wounded. Culpeper Court House will be the spot selected I believe. At that place we leave large hospitals established when the sick from this Command are daily sent by rail road. they consist principally of measel cases in the Regiments from the rural districts of the South. The Rev Mr Barnwell is with these ladies I met him at Culpeper C.H. looking out for a house as a depot for the good things to be sent from Carolina In Richmond I saw Theodore loking very well. I hope he will soon join us here. [End Page 2] Our pickets captured another of the enemy yesterday but he has not been sent in here yet. President Davis sent on Sunday a letter to Lincoln warning him what he would do in case the crew of the Savannah were dealt harshly with. His messenger returned this morning from Washington, where he had been politely treated by General Scott. The reply of Lincoln will be sent in a day or two. The day that I arrived in Richmond last Saturday, all the prisoners we had there, who had been allowed to go about the city on parole, were arrested and confined in consequence of the accounts received of the trial of the crew of the Savannah, so you see Davis is in earnest and I do not think Lincoln will dare to hang those men. We had a fine rain yesterday, another to day which still continues so we will be rid of [End Page 3] the dust for a while. What does cousin Esther think of our Bishop General. There are several parsons here, captains of Companies. How do you like the house in Church St I believe you went into the country to nurse Fannie on the very day you moved into it. Tell Fannie I will try and write to her very soon I hope that by this time she is well and strong enough to pen me a few lines. Dr Brodie, who lives in the tent with me has retired and I hear many of my neighbors making preparations for turning in. I feel like following their example but have some more writing to do first My dear love to you all Your devoted Godson Sam [End Page 4]
Title:
095. Samuel Wragg Ferguson to F.R. Barker (Godmother) -- July 10, 1861
Creator:
Heyward and Ferguson families, 1806-1923
Date:
1861-07-10
Description:
Samuel Wragg Ferguson, aide-de-camp to General P.G.T. Beauregard, writes to his godmother from Manassas Junction, on July 10th, 1861, just days before the First Battle of Bull Run. He mentions preparations being made to set up hospitals for the sick and wounded, the capture of the privateer Savannah and Jefferson Davis' warning to Lincoln not to deal harshly with the crew. He writes that Union prisoners in Richmond, who were allowed to roam freely, were "arrested and confined in consequence of the accounts received of the trial of the crew of the Savannah." 4p.
Collection:
Heyward and Ferguson Family Papers, 1806-1923
Contributing Institution:
College of Charleston Libraries
Media Type:
Manuscripts
Personal or Corporate Subject:
Ferguson, Samuel Wragg, 1834-1917--Correspondence, Savannah (Privateer), Confederate States of America. Army
Geographic Subject:
United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865
Shelving Locator:
Mss 0092
S.C. County:
Charleston County (S.C.)
Internet Media Type:
image/jpeg
Digitization Specifications:
700 ppi, 24-bit depth, color, Epson Expression 10000XL scanner, Archival Master is a tiff.
Copyright Status Statement:
Digital image copyright 2009, The College of Charleston Libraries. All rights reserved. For more information contact The College of Charleston Library, Charleston, SC 29424.