030. Nathaniel Heyward (II) to Mother-in-Law -- May 31, 1819

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    Charleston 31st May 1819. My Dear Mother We arrived here on the day we expected all well and without accident.- As we anticipated in Beaufort I found Bythewood at the wharf and according to his old practice I have no doubt will stay there a week I hope at all events to have all your groceries put on board to-day and by that means secure their passage-You will find an amount enclosed containing their various prices-Some of the things are dearer than they ought to be and there is more brown sugar than you mentioned I hope however you will find them all of good quality. Your acquaintance in Charleston is so circumscribed that I know of none in whom you feel much interest but Dr. and Mrs. Finley we sent there the day before yesterday and found them all well. I promised at the same time to send Edward and Nat to see them in a few days. I thought this proper from knowing the regard you have for Mrs. F. and believing from [End Page 1] the kindness and affection she has always shown that such a wish will not only be agreeable to her, but would have met with the approbation of her whose smile was once the sweetest solace of my life. Oh My Mother no one can fully know the bitter sensations of grief which I have experienced from my irreparable loss every step I take every movement of my life convinces me more and more of my deficiencies for the part which I ought to perform and of the inestimable value of my poor unfortunate wife- I am aware that I can gain nothing by my complaints that the fountains of grief are now closing over the event and that the order of society forbids me to dwell upon my own misfortunes; but I trust your kindness will excuse my weakness to you alone I feel authorized to speak for you alone feel as I do. -- I have not yet fixed Edward at his school but think of doing so tomorrow, he is becoming much more obedient than he was and I am in hopes the order of a school will make him quite tractable. If I like his situation I will also send [End Page 2] Nat for he speaks full plain enough to learn his letters.- I do not know what you will do with your little tyrant for he grows worse as he gets stronger-I think seating or a chair or standing in a corner the best remedies for a fidgety child it has done wonders with Edward.-I suppose by this time our little baby assists her nurse by taking plentiful sup's of gruel. Have you taken off her long frocks and caps? How does her hair look? does it seem inclined to grow again and what is the color? The weather has been rather warm but we have the advantage of a plenty of ice- An opposition establishment has been out up against the original importer and I am told they now bring it to your door instead of your being troubled to send for it- I expect soon we shall have it gratis- and then we must contrive to send you a ship load.- Sullivans Island does not appear to be as much resorted to this year as usual and I do not hear of so many persons going to the northward; but in [?] I am giving [End Page 3] you a very lame account for I have seen nobody and hear very little; but the general stagnation of business appears to be so universally felt that I suppose the terrapin system will be resorted to as much as possible-Pray give my love to Mary Elizabeth and the girls, kiss my poor little children for me and believe me to be Yours with the Sincerest affection N. Heyward Junr. P.S. I will thank you to ask Smith to send the small pair of bootees which you will find in your box to Dr. Moore with the bill-- [End Page 4]
  • Image 01
    Charleston 31st May 1819. My Dear Mother We arrived here on the day we expected all well and without accident.- As we anticipated in Beaufort I found Bythewood at the wharf and according to his old practice I have no doubt will stay there a week I hope at all events to have all your groceries put on board to-day and by that means secure their passage-You will find an amount enclosed containing their various prices-Some of the things are dearer than they ought to be and there is more brown sugar than you mentioned I hope however you will find them all of good quality. Your acquaintance in Charleston is so circumscribed that I know of none in whom you feel much interest but Dr. and Mrs. Finley we sent there the day before yesterday and found them all well. I promised at the same time to send Edward and Nat to see them in a few days. I thought this proper from knowing the regard you have for Mrs. F. and believing from [End Page 1] the kindness and affection she has always shown that such a wish will not only be agreeable to her, but would have met with the approbation of her whose smile was once the sweetest solace of my life. Oh My Mother no one can fully know the bitter sensations of grief which I have experienced from my irreparable loss every step I take every movement of my life convinces me more and more of my deficiencies for the part which I ought to perform and of the inestimable value of my poor unfortunate wife- I am aware that I can gain nothing by my complaints that the fountains of grief are now closing over the event and that the order of society forbids me to dwell upon my own misfortunes; but I trust your kindness will excuse my weakness to you alone I feel authorized to speak for you alone feel as I do. -- I have not yet fixed Edward at his school but think of doing so tomorrow, he is becoming much more obedient than he was and I am in hopes the order of a school will make him quite tractable. If I like his situation I will also send [End Page 2] Nat for he speaks full plain enough to learn his letters.- I do not know what you will do with your little tyrant for he grows worse as he gets stronger-I think seating or a chair or standing in a corner the best remedies for a fidgety child it has done wonders with Edward.-I suppose by this time our little baby assists her nurse by taking plentiful sup's of gruel. Have you taken off her long frocks and caps? How does her hair look? does it seem inclined to grow again and what is the color? The weather has been rather warm but we have the advantage of a plenty of ice- An opposition establishment has been out up against the original importer and I am told they now bring it to your door instead of your being troubled to send for it- I expect soon we shall have it gratis- and then we must contrive to send you a ship load.- Sullivans Island does not appear to be as much resorted to this year as usual and I do not hear of so many persons going to the northward; but in [?] I am giving [End Page 3] you a very lame account for I have seen nobody and hear very little; but the general stagnation of business appears to be so universally felt that I suppose the terrapin system will be resorted to as much as possible-Pray give my love to Mary Elizabeth and the girls, kiss my poor little children for me and believe me to be Yours with the Sincerest affection N. Heyward Junr. P.S. I will thank you to ask Smith to send the small pair of bootees which you will find in your box to Dr. Moore with the bill-- [End Page 4]
  • Image 01
    Charleston 31st May 1819. My Dear Mother We arrived here on the day we expected all well and without accident.- As we anticipated in Beaufort I found Bythewood at the wharf and according to his old practice I have no doubt will stay there a week I hope at all events to have all your groceries put on board to-day and by that means secure their passage-You will find an amount enclosed containing their various prices-Some of the things are dearer than they ought to be and there is more brown sugar than you mentioned I hope however you will find them all of good quality. Your acquaintance in Charleston is so circumscribed that I know of none in whom you feel much interest but Dr. and Mrs. Finley we sent there the day before yesterday and found them all well. I promised at the same time to send Edward and Nat to see them in a few days. I thought this proper from knowing the regard you have for Mrs. F. and believing from [End Page 1] the kindness and affection she has always shown that such a wish will not only be agreeable to her, but would have met with the approbation of her whose smile was once the sweetest solace of my life. Oh My Mother no one can fully know the bitter sensations of grief which I have experienced from my irreparable loss every step I take every movement of my life convinces me more and more of my deficiencies for the part which I ought to perform and of the inestimable value of my poor unfortunate wife- I am aware that I can gain nothing by my complaints that the fountains of grief are now closing over the event and that the order of society forbids me to dwell upon my own misfortunes; but I trust your kindness will excuse my weakness to you alone I feel authorized to speak for you alone feel as I do. -- I have not yet fixed Edward at his school but think of doing so tomorrow, he is becoming much more obedient than he was and I am in hopes the order of a school will make him quite tractable. If I like his situation I will also send [End Page 2] Nat for he speaks full plain enough to learn his letters.- I do not know what you will do with your little tyrant for he grows worse as he gets stronger-I think seating or a chair or standing in a corner the best remedies for a fidgety child it has done wonders with Edward.-I suppose by this time our little baby assists her nurse by taking plentiful sup's of gruel. Have you taken off her long frocks and caps? How does her hair look? does it seem inclined to grow again and what is the color? The weather has been rather warm but we have the advantage of a plenty of ice- An opposition establishment has been out up against the original importer and I am told they now bring it to your door instead of your being troubled to send for it- I expect soon we shall have it gratis- and then we must contrive to send you a ship load.- Sullivans Island does not appear to be as much resorted to this year as usual and I do not hear of so many persons going to the northward; but in [?] I am giving [End Page 3] you a very lame account for I have seen nobody and hear very little; but the general stagnation of business appears to be so universally felt that I suppose the terrapin system will be resorted to as much as possible-Pray give my love to Mary Elizabeth and the girls, kiss my poor little children for me and believe me to be Yours with the Sincerest affection N. Heyward Junr. P.S. I will thank you to ask Smith to send the small pair of bootees which you will find in your box to Dr. Moore with the bill-- [End Page 4]
  • Image 01
    Charleston 31st May 1819. My Dear Mother We arrived here on the day we expected all well and without accident.- As we anticipated in Beaufort I found Bythewood at the wharf and according to his old practice I have no doubt will stay there a week I hope at all events to have all your groceries put on board to-day and by that means secure their passage-You will find an amount enclosed containing their various prices-Some of the things are dearer than they ought to be and there is more brown sugar than you mentioned I hope however you will find them all of good quality. Your acquaintance in Charleston is so circumscribed that I know of none in whom you feel much interest but Dr. and Mrs. Finley we sent there the day before yesterday and found them all well. I promised at the same time to send Edward and Nat to see them in a few days. I thought this proper from knowing the regard you have for Mrs. F. and believing from [End Page 1] the kindness and affection she has always shown that such a wish will not only be agreeable to her, but would have met with the approbation of her whose smile was once the sweetest solace of my life. Oh My Mother no one can fully know the bitter sensations of grief which I have experienced from my irreparable loss every step I take every movement of my life convinces me more and more of my deficiencies for the part which I ought to perform and of the inestimable value of my poor unfortunate wife- I am aware that I can gain nothing by my complaints that the fountains of grief are now closing over the event and that the order of society forbids me to dwell upon my own misfortunes; but I trust your kindness will excuse my weakness to you alone I feel authorized to speak for you alone feel as I do. -- I have not yet fixed Edward at his school but think of doing so tomorrow, he is becoming much more obedient than he was and I am in hopes the order of a school will make him quite tractable. If I like his situation I will also send [End Page 2] Nat for he speaks full plain enough to learn his letters.- I do not know what you will do with your little tyrant for he grows worse as he gets stronger-I think seating or a chair or standing in a corner the best remedies for a fidgety child it has done wonders with Edward.-I suppose by this time our little baby assists her nurse by taking plentiful sup's of gruel. Have you taken off her long frocks and caps? How does her hair look? does it seem inclined to grow again and what is the color? The weather has been rather warm but we have the advantage of a plenty of ice- An opposition establishment has been out up against the original importer and I am told they now bring it to your door instead of your being troubled to send for it- I expect soon we shall have it gratis- and then we must contrive to send you a ship load.- Sullivans Island does not appear to be as much resorted to this year as usual and I do not hear of so many persons going to the northward; but in [?] I am giving [End Page 3] you a very lame account for I have seen nobody and hear very little; but the general stagnation of business appears to be so universally felt that I suppose the terrapin system will be resorted to as much as possible-Pray give my love to Mary Elizabeth and the girls, kiss my poor little children for me and believe me to be Yours with the Sincerest affection N. Heyward Junr. P.S. I will thank you to ask Smith to send the small pair of bootees which you will find in your box to Dr. Moore with the bill-- [End Page 4]
Title:
030. Nathaniel Heyward (II) to Mother-in-Law -- May 31, 1819
Creator:
Heyward and Ferguson families, 1806-1923
Date:
1819-05-31
Description:
Nathaniel Heyward writes his mother-in-law, Mary Barnwell, to inform her he has arrived in Charleston and is looking into schooling for his oldest child. He reports about an early heat wave mitigated by the plentiful supply of ice due to the recent arrival of an "opposition establishment...up against the original importer." He also comments on the "general stagnation of business" resulting, he writes, in the "terrapin system." 4p.
Collection:
Heyward and Ferguson Family Papers, 1806-1923
Contributing Institution:
College of Charleston Libraries
Media Type:
Manuscripts
Personal or Corporate Subject:
Heyward family, Heyward, Nathaniel, 1790-1819--Correspondence
Geographic Subject:
Charleston (S.C.)--Social life and customs--19th century
Shelving Locator:
Mss 0092
S.C. County:
Charleston County (S.C.)
Internet Media Type:
image/jpeg
Digitization Specifications:
700 ppi, 24-bit depth, color, Epson Expression 10000XL scanner, Archival Master is a tiff.
Copyright Status Statement:
Digital image copyright 2009, The College of Charleston Libraries. All rights reserved. For more information contact The College of Charleston Library, Charleston, SC 29424.