009. William Manigault Heyward to Mother -- May 3, 1812

  • Image 01
    London May 3d 1812 Here I am my dear Mother safely lodged again in this great and wonderful metropolis; on my arrival at Liverpool I had not hopes of [ever?] reaching this; as they detained me, and held me to bail so that I did not depart without a passport, I was apprehensive I would find some difficulty in obtaining it as soon as I wished, but being well acquainted with Mr. Rupell our charge des affaires in this country, I immediately wrote to him, and requested his authority in procuring me one; the fact was, I was more afraid of La [Force?], than any thing else, in case he should be [passed?] into the Navy or taken up as a [?] prisoner who had escaped and all my swearing would avail nothing. I kept him close [confined?] until the said [promites?] of procedure arrived Mr. Rihote the alien office did the thing effectually, they came down, much sooner than I had expected, liberated me from all my apprehensions and fears. I must not say my time hung heavy by when in Liv- for thanks to my excellent friend Mr. Harvey and his family who invited me to stay with them, which I accepted and was feasted and entertained with parties to my hearts content, the inhabitants of Liver- are extremely hospitable and [?] in the most elegant and sumptuous manner, it is one of the greatest places of trade in the Kingdom, its riches are immence of course - The journey up 220 miles the change of climate and the sedentary life I had been leading on board the ship with the violent exercise of travelling in the mail coach, all conduced to give me a fever [End Page 1]and a sore throat. It confined me for a day and an half, but as I think my self come what of a judge with aspect to my own cases, I doctored myself by taking a good dose of Castor oil. It had the desired effect drove off the fever, and put an end to the sore throat. I have now a cold in my head, and a sore nose I presume a remnant of the fever, it is excessively disagreeable; I am in that state, not indisposed sufficiently as to keep me withindoors, and yet uncomfortable when I go out- You may fancy me with a huge bottle nose and a tremendous pair of whiskers, I cut a ridiculous figure enough. by the bye, I have thought proper to make them more sizable since I have arrived for I look so a la Militaire, that I was stopped the other day by a soldier presuming I belonged to one of his Majesty's regiments of horse to ask me some questions- after that I determined to clip them, not that I dislike to be thought belonging to the Army, but I wish to pass for only what I am, an American and plain Mr. Hd. London is all gayety for this is just the season for it, April and May. My Aunt Hd. and Maria with Mrs. and Miss Rutledge have come up to partake of it, I call'd immediately upon them and have offered my services to attend them. They seem quite tired of England and wish themselves again quickly [?]. They intend returning in the fall with McNeal, Miss Rutledge acommpany'g them; Maria is very much improved, and my Aunts looks extremely well-- I and Maria have had quite an eclaircissement, and we are excellent friends again. [End Page 2]Have not heard any very late accounts of Nat. Maria received a letter from him but some time ago. he mentions his presentation at Court and his dining with the Duke of [Basan?], the Minister of the [?]; I saw a gentleman yesterday who has lately left Paris, he says he did not see him but heard of him, he was quite well, but could give me no information with respect to his movements. I shall write to him the first dispatches that are sent and shall enclose my fathers letter, I presume you got letters from him by the arrival of the Constitution- As to my own plans I can give you nothing as a certainty yet, probably in my next I shall- McNeal's short stay in London has prevented me from executing all your commissions, I have [?] procured some gloves. I think very good ones, I went to the factory myself, the first in town. the wire buttons, I think are exactly those you desired me to send- I have also sent Ann three pieces of music, which I admire extremely, particularly Marian tell her to practice them well. The rest of your commissions I'll endeavour to execute the next opportunity, I have a long letter in store for my excellent father which I shall dispatch the first good opportunity- My love and sincere affection to my Aunt Manigault, and ask her if I can do any thing for her here- This is not the last letter I have ever written, but that, that comes direct and warm from the heart, is preferable to all your studied phrases and will turned periods- Yours Most Affect. and dutiful Son Wm M Heyward [End Page 3]I open my letter, to say I have just heard intelligence of Nat. [?] that he has arrived at Southampton from France, Mr. Tunno received a letter from him, requesting him to write a note to the alien office desiring them to send him a passport to come up- Mr. T. has sent the letter to me, and I am going to do the business as I am known at the office, He will be with me, by the day after tomorrow. at least I hope so. -- I am obliged to close and dispatch my letter, as I am afraid it will miss McNeal.- Affctny. yours Wm Hd. [End Page 4]
  • Image 01
    London May 3d 1812 Here I am my dear Mother safely lodged again in this great and wonderful metropolis; on my arrival at Liverpool I had not hopes of [ever?] reaching this; as they detained me, and held me to bail so that I did not depart without a passport, I was apprehensive I would find some difficulty in obtaining it as soon as I wished, but being well acquainted with Mr. Rupell our charge des affaires in this country, I immediately wrote to him, and requested his authority in procuring me one; the fact was, I was more afraid of La [Force?], than any thing else, in case he should be [passed?] into the Navy or taken up as a [?] prisoner who had escaped and all my swearing would avail nothing. I kept him close [confined?] until the said [promites?] of procedure arrived Mr. Rihote the alien office did the thing effectually, they came down, much sooner than I had expected, liberated me from all my apprehensions and fears. I must not say my time hung heavy by when in Liv- for thanks to my excellent friend Mr. Harvey and his family who invited me to stay with them, which I accepted and was feasted and entertained with parties to my hearts content, the inhabitants of Liver- are extremely hospitable and [?] in the most elegant and sumptuous manner, it is one of the greatest places of trade in the Kingdom, its riches are immence of course - The journey up 220 miles the change of climate and the sedentary life I had been leading on board the ship with the violent exercise of travelling in the mail coach, all conduced to give me a fever [End Page 1]and a sore throat. It confined me for a day and an half, but as I think my self come what of a judge with aspect to my own cases, I doctored myself by taking a good dose of Castor oil. It had the desired effect drove off the fever, and put an end to the sore throat. I have now a cold in my head, and a sore nose I presume a remnant of the fever, it is excessively disagreeable; I am in that state, not indisposed sufficiently as to keep me withindoors, and yet uncomfortable when I go out- You may fancy me with a huge bottle nose and a tremendous pair of whiskers, I cut a ridiculous figure enough. by the bye, I have thought proper to make them more sizable since I have arrived for I look so a la Militaire, that I was stopped the other day by a soldier presuming I belonged to one of his Majesty's regiments of horse to ask me some questions- after that I determined to clip them, not that I dislike to be thought belonging to the Army, but I wish to pass for only what I am, an American and plain Mr. Hd. London is all gayety for this is just the season for it, April and May. My Aunt Hd. and Maria with Mrs. and Miss Rutledge have come up to partake of it, I call'd immediately upon them and have offered my services to attend them. They seem quite tired of England and wish themselves again quickly [?]. They intend returning in the fall with McNeal, Miss Rutledge acommpany'g them; Maria is very much improved, and my Aunts looks extremely well-- I and Maria have had quite an eclaircissement, and we are excellent friends again. [End Page 2]Have not heard any very late accounts of Nat. Maria received a letter from him but some time ago. he mentions his presentation at Court and his dining with the Duke of [Basan?], the Minister of the [?]; I saw a gentleman yesterday who has lately left Paris, he says he did not see him but heard of him, he was quite well, but could give me no information with respect to his movements. I shall write to him the first dispatches that are sent and shall enclose my fathers letter, I presume you got letters from him by the arrival of the Constitution- As to my own plans I can give you nothing as a certainty yet, probably in my next I shall- McNeal's short stay in London has prevented me from executing all your commissions, I have [?] procured some gloves. I think very good ones, I went to the factory myself, the first in town. the wire buttons, I think are exactly those you desired me to send- I have also sent Ann three pieces of music, which I admire extremely, particularly Marian tell her to practice them well. The rest of your commissions I'll endeavour to execute the next opportunity, I have a long letter in store for my excellent father which I shall dispatch the first good opportunity- My love and sincere affection to my Aunt Manigault, and ask her if I can do any thing for her here- This is not the last letter I have ever written, but that, that comes direct and warm from the heart, is preferable to all your studied phrases and will turned periods- Yours Most Affect. and dutiful Son Wm M Heyward [End Page 3]I open my letter, to say I have just heard intelligence of Nat. [?] that he has arrived at Southampton from France, Mr. Tunno received a letter from him, requesting him to write a note to the alien office desiring them to send him a passport to come up- Mr. T. has sent the letter to me, and I am going to do the business as I am known at the office, He will be with me, by the day after tomorrow. at least I hope so. -- I am obliged to close and dispatch my letter, as I am afraid it will miss McNeal.- Affctny. yours Wm Hd. [End Page 4]
  • Image 01
    London May 3d 1812 Here I am my dear Mother safely lodged again in this great and wonderful metropolis; on my arrival at Liverpool I had not hopes of [ever?] reaching this; as they detained me, and held me to bail so that I did not depart without a passport, I was apprehensive I would find some difficulty in obtaining it as soon as I wished, but being well acquainted with Mr. Rupell our charge des affaires in this country, I immediately wrote to him, and requested his authority in procuring me one; the fact was, I was more afraid of La [Force?], than any thing else, in case he should be [passed?] into the Navy or taken up as a [?] prisoner who had escaped and all my swearing would avail nothing. I kept him close [confined?] until the said [promites?] of procedure arrived Mr. Rihote the alien office did the thing effectually, they came down, much sooner than I had expected, liberated me from all my apprehensions and fears. I must not say my time hung heavy by when in Liv- for thanks to my excellent friend Mr. Harvey and his family who invited me to stay with them, which I accepted and was feasted and entertained with parties to my hearts content, the inhabitants of Liver- are extremely hospitable and [?] in the most elegant and sumptuous manner, it is one of the greatest places of trade in the Kingdom, its riches are immence of course - The journey up 220 miles the change of climate and the sedentary life I had been leading on board the ship with the violent exercise of travelling in the mail coach, all conduced to give me a fever [End Page 1]and a sore throat. It confined me for a day and an half, but as I think my self come what of a judge with aspect to my own cases, I doctored myself by taking a good dose of Castor oil. It had the desired effect drove off the fever, and put an end to the sore throat. I have now a cold in my head, and a sore nose I presume a remnant of the fever, it is excessively disagreeable; I am in that state, not indisposed sufficiently as to keep me withindoors, and yet uncomfortable when I go out- You may fancy me with a huge bottle nose and a tremendous pair of whiskers, I cut a ridiculous figure enough. by the bye, I have thought proper to make them more sizable since I have arrived for I look so a la Militaire, that I was stopped the other day by a soldier presuming I belonged to one of his Majesty's regiments of horse to ask me some questions- after that I determined to clip them, not that I dislike to be thought belonging to the Army, but I wish to pass for only what I am, an American and plain Mr. Hd. London is all gayety for this is just the season for it, April and May. My Aunt Hd. and Maria with Mrs. and Miss Rutledge have come up to partake of it, I call'd immediately upon them and have offered my services to attend them. They seem quite tired of England and wish themselves again quickly [?]. They intend returning in the fall with McNeal, Miss Rutledge acommpany'g them; Maria is very much improved, and my Aunts looks extremely well-- I and Maria have had quite an eclaircissement, and we are excellent friends again. [End Page 2]Have not heard any very late accounts of Nat. Maria received a letter from him but some time ago. he mentions his presentation at Court and his dining with the Duke of [Basan?], the Minister of the [?]; I saw a gentleman yesterday who has lately left Paris, he says he did not see him but heard of him, he was quite well, but could give me no information with respect to his movements. I shall write to him the first dispatches that are sent and shall enclose my fathers letter, I presume you got letters from him by the arrival of the Constitution- As to my own plans I can give you nothing as a certainty yet, probably in my next I shall- McNeal's short stay in London has prevented me from executing all your commissions, I have [?] procured some gloves. I think very good ones, I went to the factory myself, the first in town. the wire buttons, I think are exactly those you desired me to send- I have also sent Ann three pieces of music, which I admire extremely, particularly Marian tell her to practice them well. The rest of your commissions I'll endeavour to execute the next opportunity, I have a long letter in store for my excellent father which I shall dispatch the first good opportunity- My love and sincere affection to my Aunt Manigault, and ask her if I can do any thing for her here- This is not the last letter I have ever written, but that, that comes direct and warm from the heart, is preferable to all your studied phrases and will turned periods- Yours Most Affect. and dutiful Son Wm M Heyward [End Page 3]I open my letter, to say I have just heard intelligence of Nat. [?] that he has arrived at Southampton from France, Mr. Tunno received a letter from him, requesting him to write a note to the alien office desiring them to send him a passport to come up- Mr. T. has sent the letter to me, and I am going to do the business as I am known at the office, He will be with me, by the day after tomorrow. at least I hope so. -- I am obliged to close and dispatch my letter, as I am afraid it will miss McNeal.- Affctny. yours Wm Hd. [End Page 4]
  • Image 01
    London May 3d 1812 Here I am my dear Mother safely lodged again in this great and wonderful metropolis; on my arrival at Liverpool I had not hopes of [ever?] reaching this; as they detained me, and held me to bail so that I did not depart without a passport, I was apprehensive I would find some difficulty in obtaining it as soon as I wished, but being well acquainted with Mr. Rupell our charge des affaires in this country, I immediately wrote to him, and requested his authority in procuring me one; the fact was, I was more afraid of La [Force?], than any thing else, in case he should be [passed?] into the Navy or taken up as a [?] prisoner who had escaped and all my swearing would avail nothing. I kept him close [confined?] until the said [promites?] of procedure arrived Mr. Rihote the alien office did the thing effectually, they came down, much sooner than I had expected, liberated me from all my apprehensions and fears. I must not say my time hung heavy by when in Liv- for thanks to my excellent friend Mr. Harvey and his family who invited me to stay with them, which I accepted and was feasted and entertained with parties to my hearts content, the inhabitants of Liver- are extremely hospitable and [?] in the most elegant and sumptuous manner, it is one of the greatest places of trade in the Kingdom, its riches are immence of course - The journey up 220 miles the change of climate and the sedentary life I had been leading on board the ship with the violent exercise of travelling in the mail coach, all conduced to give me a fever [End Page 1]and a sore throat. It confined me for a day and an half, but as I think my self come what of a judge with aspect to my own cases, I doctored myself by taking a good dose of Castor oil. It had the desired effect drove off the fever, and put an end to the sore throat. I have now a cold in my head, and a sore nose I presume a remnant of the fever, it is excessively disagreeable; I am in that state, not indisposed sufficiently as to keep me withindoors, and yet uncomfortable when I go out- You may fancy me with a huge bottle nose and a tremendous pair of whiskers, I cut a ridiculous figure enough. by the bye, I have thought proper to make them more sizable since I have arrived for I look so a la Militaire, that I was stopped the other day by a soldier presuming I belonged to one of his Majesty's regiments of horse to ask me some questions- after that I determined to clip them, not that I dislike to be thought belonging to the Army, but I wish to pass for only what I am, an American and plain Mr. Hd. London is all gayety for this is just the season for it, April and May. My Aunt Hd. and Maria with Mrs. and Miss Rutledge have come up to partake of it, I call'd immediately upon them and have offered my services to attend them. They seem quite tired of England and wish themselves again quickly [?]. They intend returning in the fall with McNeal, Miss Rutledge acommpany'g them; Maria is very much improved, and my Aunts looks extremely well-- I and Maria have had quite an eclaircissement, and we are excellent friends again. [End Page 2]Have not heard any very late accounts of Nat. Maria received a letter from him but some time ago. he mentions his presentation at Court and his dining with the Duke of [Basan?], the Minister of the [?]; I saw a gentleman yesterday who has lately left Paris, he says he did not see him but heard of him, he was quite well, but could give me no information with respect to his movements. I shall write to him the first dispatches that are sent and shall enclose my fathers letter, I presume you got letters from him by the arrival of the Constitution- As to my own plans I can give you nothing as a certainty yet, probably in my next I shall- McNeal's short stay in London has prevented me from executing all your commissions, I have [?] procured some gloves. I think very good ones, I went to the factory myself, the first in town. the wire buttons, I think are exactly those you desired me to send- I have also sent Ann three pieces of music, which I admire extremely, particularly Marian tell her to practice them well. The rest of your commissions I'll endeavour to execute the next opportunity, I have a long letter in store for my excellent father which I shall dispatch the first good opportunity- My love and sincere affection to my Aunt Manigault, and ask her if I can do any thing for her here- This is not the last letter I have ever written, but that, that comes direct and warm from the heart, is preferable to all your studied phrases and will turned periods- Yours Most Affect. and dutiful Son Wm M Heyward [End Page 3]I open my letter, to say I have just heard intelligence of Nat. [?] that he has arrived at Southampton from France, Mr. Tunno received a letter from him, requesting him to write a note to the alien office desiring them to send him a passport to come up- Mr. T. has sent the letter to me, and I am going to do the business as I am known at the office, He will be with me, by the day after tomorrow. at least I hope so. -- I am obliged to close and dispatch my letter, as I am afraid it will miss McNeal.- Affctny. yours Wm Hd. [End Page 4]
Title:
009. William Manigault Heyward to Mother -- May 3, 1812
Creator:
Heyward and Ferguson families, 1806-1923
Date:
1812-05-03
Description:
Letter from William Heyward to his mother from London. William writes of issues he has had in procuring a passport and describes a lengthy visit to Liverpool. He mentions some of the purchases he has made for the family back home and relays the news that his brother Nathaniel has recently arrived in England from France. 4p.
Collection:
Heyward and Ferguson Family Papers, 1806-1923
Contributing Institution:
College of Charleston Libraries
Media Type:
Manuscripts
Personal or Corporate Subject:
Heyward family, Heyward, William Manigault, 1788-1820--Correspondence
Geographic Subject:
London (England)--Description and travel
Shelving Locator:
Mss 0092
S.C. County:
Charleston County (S.C.)
Internet Media Type:
image/jpeg
Digitization Specifications:
700 ppi, 24-bit depth, color, Epson Expression 10000XL scanner, Archival Master is a tiff.
Copyright Status Statement:
Digital image copyright 2009, The College of Charleston Libraries. All rights reserved. For more information contact The College of Charleston Library, Charleston, SC 29424.