Letter from Thomas Jervey to Charles Drayton

  • Image 01
    Philadelphia Sept.[September] 16th 1857 Dear Colonel-- I must indeed apologize to you for my having written to you, before, but you with readily excuse me when I inform you that I have been as busy in making love that I have [illegible due to crease and tear in paper] of minor importance-- news flies so swiftly and there are so many busy bodies in the world who meddle with their neighbours business, that I suppose you had before this heard of my engagement. Yes my dear friend I am very happy in professing the love of or[sic] most divine Creature-- a Miss Elisabeth Thomas -- a young lady belonging to Burlington N.[New] Jersey -- but that happiness; as yet overcast with uneasiness -- Her Grandmother to whom I was entire strangers, when, I made my intentions known to her, was so awestruck that her Granddaughter should make an engagement without her Consent, with an entire stranger; she said she would not hear of such a thing-- it should never have her sanction. She must first hear more particularly of my family [and] Character, before she could even know of such a thing-- therefore- poor Piliginlic was forbid visiting or even seeing the object of his affections.. But no impediment stands in the way of lovers- we see one another every Sunday at Church, three times a day [and] between services walk into the Country. In the week end days thanks to attending my [illegible] in Philadelphia -- driving which time we correspond in cog: with such other. She is a soul beauty, dark Hair -- dark Hazel eyes, nearly black -- handsome figure-- about 5 of 5 in.[inches] in height -- as [haity?] -- I don't knows[sic] under what planet I was from, but the idea of a handsome girl loving an ugly fellerer[sic] like myself-- tis to my astonishing bud my love [and] attention with make amends for my looks-- I am however son of Hen [Henrietta]. She says death only should part us [and] she says She would follows[sic] me vai fin a moreurt[sic] to the alter but I wish not to be so precipitates. i will wait [and] see if I can't get round the [end of page one] old Grandmother first. I have been quite I should say very highly honoured by her. She has commissioned the Baptist minister in Burlington to inform himself of my Connections [and] Character. He visits Philadelphia for that object [and] called on my friends have to ask concerning me whether he has satisfied himself on to that point or no. I am unable to say-- the Old Lady told that she should not marry me But She says she will, [and] She is mistress of her own acting her mother being afraid that we will we would go secretly to our of the parsons in the town for that purpose, sent round to of them Cautioning them not to marry us. One evening having met Elisabeth on the [Green?] Bank by the river side -- we proposed going over to Bristol -- she was dressed in White exactly as a bride, sound of the good people having seen us afraid a report that we were going to get [married?] -- our returning the Grandmother was in a trembling fidget, she asked first-- thing if we were married. I of course told her the truth -- No! She seemed to be wonderfully relieved. She then requested me to be seen no more by her granddaughter -- but i never could bring myself to deny myself that happiness-- I see her as often as I can -- [and] wen we do not meet after a week absence -- that beautiful song "Have we met too soon to part" constantly reoccurs to my mind -- But I try to banish it from my mind when with her -- But when we part, too sensibly do I feel the fatal truth. You will say that it is a very romantic affair -- but I think agree I[sic] knows the reality. Have you heard from Lowel-- How does he like his situation -- How does our friend Payne do -- I suppose you are constantly together the last of the [Quarto?]. Little did I think four weeks before my departure I should be in Philadelphia to be married to under go what I have done. However it is all for the best that we should not be [end of page two] always together. Should taste of the bitter as well as the sweets of Courtship. I shall yet be happy -- as long as we are constant to each other. She says to what ever part of the world I go or whatever may be my lot. she will gladly follow me the time is not far distant [and] I trust when I will be able [and] have this [felicity?] to introduce to my Charleston Mrs Thomas D. Jervey. When that time arrives I shall be content [and] happy [and] not before. I will [illegible due to tear in the page] however if I find that they there is no way of getting round the Old Lady. I will runaway with her get married [and] this she may make the most of it. Have you seen my friend [illegible] lately. How is he. Does he ever speak of me. I love how more than a brother. I have [illegible] from infancy looked upon him as such. I would do anything in the world for him. I wish that you were more intimate. it [would] give me infinite pleasure I have obtained a [illegible due to tear in the page] as Book Keeper [and] tout ensemble is an extensive Danger [illegible due to tear in the page] Refinery here. [Henford?] I am always pretty well employed I am not over [and] above [tile?] at any rate. There was no other situation open [and] I have made a virtue of necessity. I will get very well paid -- [and] after being here sometime [and] getting acquainted with the business I don"t[sic] know but what things will work to my advantage-- it is a very lucrative business...... Have the Miss Mc returned from Greenville, is my friend George Strik pursuing Miss Anna -- with his attentions; -- What did the folk think of my abrupt departure. Do our folks miss me much. How seen this regularly at Church I suppose. I would wish that you would visit them sometime. How you as yet decided what you intend to turn your attention to - do write me all about it I feel quite interested in all your [illegible] -- How is Mr. Merlow getting on has he still Continue business. Has his wife returned from Nassau -- Do write me often -- In the hope of hearing soon from your I remain your friend Thomas D. Jervey [end of page three] [written vertically in the center of the page] single [in different ink] 23 [stamp] Philad Pa Sep 17 Mr. Charles Drayton care of Miss Gibbes, Warring [and] Johnston [far left in smaller letters] mail [large lettes in the center] Charleston, So. Car. [South Carolina] [end of page four]
  • Image 01
    Philadelphia Sept.[September] 16th 1857 Dear Colonel-- I must indeed apologize to you for my having written to you, before, but you with readily excuse me when I inform you that I have been as busy in making love that I have [illegible due to crease and tear in paper] of minor importance-- news flies so swiftly and there are so many busy bodies in the world who meddle with their neighbours business, that I suppose you had before this heard of my engagement. Yes my dear friend I am very happy in professing the love of or[sic] most divine Creature-- a Miss Elisabeth Thomas -- a young lady belonging to Burlington N.[New] Jersey -- but that happiness; as yet overcast with uneasiness -- Her Grandmother to whom I was entire strangers, when, I made my intentions known to her, was so awestruck that her Granddaughter should make an engagement without her Consent, with an entire stranger; she said she would not hear of such a thing-- it should never have her sanction. She must first hear more particularly of my family [and] Character, before she could even know of such a thing-- therefore- poor Piliginlic was forbid visiting or even seeing the object of his affections.. But no impediment stands in the way of lovers- we see one another every Sunday at Church, three times a day [and] between services walk into the Country. In the week end days thanks to attending my [illegible] in Philadelphia -- driving which time we correspond in cog: with such other. She is a soul beauty, dark Hair -- dark Hazel eyes, nearly black -- handsome figure-- about 5 of 5 in.[inches] in height -- as [haity?] -- I don't knows[sic] under what planet I was from, but the idea of a handsome girl loving an ugly fellerer[sic] like myself-- tis to my astonishing bud my love [and] attention with make amends for my looks-- I am however son of Hen [Henrietta]. She says death only should part us [and] she says She would follows[sic] me vai fin a moreurt[sic] to the alter but I wish not to be so precipitates. i will wait [and] see if I can't get round the [end of page one] old Grandmother first. I have been quite I should say very highly honoured by her. She has commissioned the Baptist minister in Burlington to inform himself of my Connections [and] Character. He visits Philadelphia for that object [and] called on my friends have to ask concerning me whether he has satisfied himself on to that point or no. I am unable to say-- the Old Lady told that she should not marry me But She says she will, [and] She is mistress of her own acting her mother being afraid that we will we would go secretly to our of the parsons in the town for that purpose, sent round to of them Cautioning them not to marry us. One evening having met Elisabeth on the [Green?] Bank by the river side -- we proposed going over to Bristol -- she was dressed in White exactly as a bride, sound of the good people having seen us afraid a report that we were going to get [married?] -- our returning the Grandmother was in a trembling fidget, she asked first-- thing if we were married. I of course told her the truth -- No! She seemed to be wonderfully relieved. She then requested me to be seen no more by her granddaughter -- but i never could bring myself to deny myself that happiness-- I see her as often as I can -- [and] wen we do not meet after a week absence -- that beautiful song "Have we met too soon to part" constantly reoccurs to my mind -- But I try to banish it from my mind when with her -- But when we part, too sensibly do I feel the fatal truth. You will say that it is a very romantic affair -- but I think agree I[sic] knows the reality. Have you heard from Lowel-- How does he like his situation -- How does our friend Payne do -- I suppose you are constantly together the last of the [Quarto?]. Little did I think four weeks before my departure I should be in Philadelphia to be married to under go what I have done. However it is all for the best that we should not be [end of page two] always together. Should taste of the bitter as well as the sweets of Courtship. I shall yet be happy -- as long as we are constant to each other. She says to what ever part of the world I go or whatever may be my lot. she will gladly follow me the time is not far distant [and] I trust when I will be able [and] have this [felicity?] to introduce to my Charleston Mrs Thomas D. Jervey. When that time arrives I shall be content [and] happy [and] not before. I will [illegible due to tear in the page] however if I find that they there is no way of getting round the Old Lady. I will runaway with her get married [and] this she may make the most of it. Have you seen my friend [illegible] lately. How is he. Does he ever speak of me. I love how more than a brother. I have [illegible] from infancy looked upon him as such. I would do anything in the world for him. I wish that you were more intimate. it [would] give me infinite pleasure I have obtained a [illegible due to tear in the page] as Book Keeper [and] tout ensemble is an extensive Danger [illegible due to tear in the page] Refinery here. [Henford?] I am always pretty well employed I am not over [and] above [tile?] at any rate. There was no other situation open [and] I have made a virtue of necessity. I will get very well paid -- [and] after being here sometime [and] getting acquainted with the business I don"t[sic] know but what things will work to my advantage-- it is a very lucrative business...... Have the Miss Mc returned from Greenville, is my friend George Strik pursuing Miss Anna -- with his attentions; -- What did the folk think of my abrupt departure. Do our folks miss me much. How seen this regularly at Church I suppose. I would wish that you would visit them sometime. How you as yet decided what you intend to turn your attention to - do write me all about it I feel quite interested in all your [illegible] -- How is Mr. Merlow getting on has he still Continue business. Has his wife returned from Nassau -- Do write me often -- In the hope of hearing soon from your I remain your friend Thomas D. Jervey [end of page three] [written vertically in the center of the page] single [in different ink] 23 [stamp] Philad Pa Sep 17 Mr. Charles Drayton care of Miss Gibbes, Warring [and] Johnston [far left in smaller letters] mail [large lettes in the center] Charleston, So. Car. [South Carolina] [end of page four]
  • Image 01
    Philadelphia Sept.[September] 16th 1857 Dear Colonel-- I must indeed apologize to you for my having written to you, before, but you with readily excuse me when I inform you that I have been as busy in making love that I have [illegible due to crease and tear in paper] of minor importance-- news flies so swiftly and there are so many busy bodies in the world who meddle with their neighbours business, that I suppose you had before this heard of my engagement. Yes my dear friend I am very happy in professing the love of or[sic] most divine Creature-- a Miss Elisabeth Thomas -- a young lady belonging to Burlington N.[New] Jersey -- but that happiness; as yet overcast with uneasiness -- Her Grandmother to whom I was entire strangers, when, I made my intentions known to her, was so awestruck that her Granddaughter should make an engagement without her Consent, with an entire stranger; she said she would not hear of such a thing-- it should never have her sanction. She must first hear more particularly of my family [and] Character, before she could even know of such a thing-- therefore- poor Piliginlic was forbid visiting or even seeing the object of his affections.. But no impediment stands in the way of lovers- we see one another every Sunday at Church, three times a day [and] between services walk into the Country. In the week end days thanks to attending my [illegible] in Philadelphia -- driving which time we correspond in cog: with such other. She is a soul beauty, dark Hair -- dark Hazel eyes, nearly black -- handsome figure-- about 5 of 5 in.[inches] in height -- as [haity?] -- I don't knows[sic] under what planet I was from, but the idea of a handsome girl loving an ugly fellerer[sic] like myself-- tis to my astonishing bud my love [and] attention with make amends for my looks-- I am however son of Hen [Henrietta]. She says death only should part us [and] she says She would follows[sic] me vai fin a moreurt[sic] to the alter but I wish not to be so precipitates. i will wait [and] see if I can't get round the [end of page one] old Grandmother first. I have been quite I should say very highly honoured by her. She has commissioned the Baptist minister in Burlington to inform himself of my Connections [and] Character. He visits Philadelphia for that object [and] called on my friends have to ask concerning me whether he has satisfied himself on to that point or no. I am unable to say-- the Old Lady told that she should not marry me But She says she will, [and] She is mistress of her own acting her mother being afraid that we will we would go secretly to our of the parsons in the town for that purpose, sent round to of them Cautioning them not to marry us. One evening having met Elisabeth on the [Green?] Bank by the river side -- we proposed going over to Bristol -- she was dressed in White exactly as a bride, sound of the good people having seen us afraid a report that we were going to get [married?] -- our returning the Grandmother was in a trembling fidget, she asked first-- thing if we were married. I of course told her the truth -- No! She seemed to be wonderfully relieved. She then requested me to be seen no more by her granddaughter -- but i never could bring myself to deny myself that happiness-- I see her as often as I can -- [and] wen we do not meet after a week absence -- that beautiful song "Have we met too soon to part" constantly reoccurs to my mind -- But I try to banish it from my mind when with her -- But when we part, too sensibly do I feel the fatal truth. You will say that it is a very romantic affair -- but I think agree I[sic] knows the reality. Have you heard from Lowel-- How does he like his situation -- How does our friend Payne do -- I suppose you are constantly together the last of the [Quarto?]. Little did I think four weeks before my departure I should be in Philadelphia to be married to under go what I have done. However it is all for the best that we should not be [end of page two] always together. Should taste of the bitter as well as the sweets of Courtship. I shall yet be happy -- as long as we are constant to each other. She says to what ever part of the world I go or whatever may be my lot. she will gladly follow me the time is not far distant [and] I trust when I will be able [and] have this [felicity?] to introduce to my Charleston Mrs Thomas D. Jervey. When that time arrives I shall be content [and] happy [and] not before. I will [illegible due to tear in the page] however if I find that they there is no way of getting round the Old Lady. I will runaway with her get married [and] this she may make the most of it. Have you seen my friend [illegible] lately. How is he. Does he ever speak of me. I love how more than a brother. I have [illegible] from infancy looked upon him as such. I would do anything in the world for him. I wish that you were more intimate. it [would] give me infinite pleasure I have obtained a [illegible due to tear in the page] as Book Keeper [and] tout ensemble is an extensive Danger [illegible due to tear in the page] Refinery here. [Henford?] I am always pretty well employed I am not over [and] above [tile?] at any rate. There was no other situation open [and] I have made a virtue of necessity. I will get very well paid -- [and] after being here sometime [and] getting acquainted with the business I don"t[sic] know but what things will work to my advantage-- it is a very lucrative business...... Have the Miss Mc returned from Greenville, is my friend George Strik pursuing Miss Anna -- with his attentions; -- What did the folk think of my abrupt departure. Do our folks miss me much. How seen this regularly at Church I suppose. I would wish that you would visit them sometime. How you as yet decided what you intend to turn your attention to - do write me all about it I feel quite interested in all your [illegible] -- How is Mr. Merlow getting on has he still Continue business. Has his wife returned from Nassau -- Do write me often -- In the hope of hearing soon from your I remain your friend Thomas D. Jervey [end of page three] [written vertically in the center of the page] single [in different ink] 23 [stamp] Philad Pa Sep 17 Mr. Charles Drayton care of Miss Gibbes, Warring [and] Johnston [far left in smaller letters] mail [large lettes in the center] Charleston, So. Car. [South Carolina] [end of page four]
  • Image 01
    Philadelphia Sept.[September] 16th 1857 Dear Colonel-- I must indeed apologize to you for my having written to you, before, but you with readily excuse me when I inform you that I have been as busy in making love that I have [illegible due to crease and tear in paper] of minor importance-- news flies so swiftly and there are so many busy bodies in the world who meddle with their neighbours business, that I suppose you had before this heard of my engagement. Yes my dear friend I am very happy in professing the love of or[sic] most divine Creature-- a Miss Elisabeth Thomas -- a young lady belonging to Burlington N.[New] Jersey -- but that happiness; as yet overcast with uneasiness -- Her Grandmother to whom I was entire strangers, when, I made my intentions known to her, was so awestruck that her Granddaughter should make an engagement without her Consent, with an entire stranger; she said she would not hear of such a thing-- it should never have her sanction. She must first hear more particularly of my family [and] Character, before she could even know of such a thing-- therefore- poor Piliginlic was forbid visiting or even seeing the object of his affections.. But no impediment stands in the way of lovers- we see one another every Sunday at Church, three times a day [and] between services walk into the Country. In the week end days thanks to attending my [illegible] in Philadelphia -- driving which time we correspond in cog: with such other. She is a soul beauty, dark Hair -- dark Hazel eyes, nearly black -- handsome figure-- about 5 of 5 in.[inches] in height -- as [haity?] -- I don't knows[sic] under what planet I was from, but the idea of a handsome girl loving an ugly fellerer[sic] like myself-- tis to my astonishing bud my love [and] attention with make amends for my looks-- I am however son of Hen [Henrietta]. She says death only should part us [and] she says She would follows[sic] me vai fin a moreurt[sic] to the alter but I wish not to be so precipitates. i will wait [and] see if I can't get round the [end of page one] old Grandmother first. I have been quite I should say very highly honoured by her. She has commissioned the Baptist minister in Burlington to inform himself of my Connections [and] Character. He visits Philadelphia for that object [and] called on my friends have to ask concerning me whether he has satisfied himself on to that point or no. I am unable to say-- the Old Lady told that she should not marry me But She says she will, [and] She is mistress of her own acting her mother being afraid that we will we would go secretly to our of the parsons in the town for that purpose, sent round to of them Cautioning them not to marry us. One evening having met Elisabeth on the [Green?] Bank by the river side -- we proposed going over to Bristol -- she was dressed in White exactly as a bride, sound of the good people having seen us afraid a report that we were going to get [married?] -- our returning the Grandmother was in a trembling fidget, she asked first-- thing if we were married. I of course told her the truth -- No! She seemed to be wonderfully relieved. She then requested me to be seen no more by her granddaughter -- but i never could bring myself to deny myself that happiness-- I see her as often as I can -- [and] wen we do not meet after a week absence -- that beautiful song "Have we met too soon to part" constantly reoccurs to my mind -- But I try to banish it from my mind when with her -- But when we part, too sensibly do I feel the fatal truth. You will say that it is a very romantic affair -- but I think agree I[sic] knows the reality. Have you heard from Lowel-- How does he like his situation -- How does our friend Payne do -- I suppose you are constantly together the last of the [Quarto?]. Little did I think four weeks before my departure I should be in Philadelphia to be married to under go what I have done. However it is all for the best that we should not be [end of page two] always together. Should taste of the bitter as well as the sweets of Courtship. I shall yet be happy -- as long as we are constant to each other. She says to what ever part of the world I go or whatever may be my lot. she will gladly follow me the time is not far distant [and] I trust when I will be able [and] have this [felicity?] to introduce to my Charleston Mrs Thomas D. Jervey. When that time arrives I shall be content [and] happy [and] not before. I will [illegible due to tear in the page] however if I find that they there is no way of getting round the Old Lady. I will runaway with her get married [and] this she may make the most of it. Have you seen my friend [illegible] lately. How is he. Does he ever speak of me. I love how more than a brother. I have [illegible] from infancy looked upon him as such. I would do anything in the world for him. I wish that you were more intimate. it [would] give me infinite pleasure I have obtained a [illegible due to tear in the page] as Book Keeper [and] tout ensemble is an extensive Danger [illegible due to tear in the page] Refinery here. [Henford?] I am always pretty well employed I am not over [and] above [tile?] at any rate. There was no other situation open [and] I have made a virtue of necessity. I will get very well paid -- [and] after being here sometime [and] getting acquainted with the business I don"t[sic] know but what things will work to my advantage-- it is a very lucrative business...... Have the Miss Mc returned from Greenville, is my friend George Strik pursuing Miss Anna -- with his attentions; -- What did the folk think of my abrupt departure. Do our folks miss me much. How seen this regularly at Church I suppose. I would wish that you would visit them sometime. How you as yet decided what you intend to turn your attention to - do write me all about it I feel quite interested in all your [illegible] -- How is Mr. Merlow getting on has he still Continue business. Has his wife returned from Nassau -- Do write me often -- In the hope of hearing soon from your I remain your friend Thomas D. Jervey [end of page three] [written vertically in the center of the page] single [in different ink] 23 [stamp] Philad Pa Sep 17 Mr. Charles Drayton care of Miss Gibbes, Warring [and] Johnston [far left in smaller letters] mail [large lettes in the center] Charleston, So. Car. [South Carolina] [end of page four]
Title:
Letter from Thomas Jervey to Charles Drayton
Creator:
Jervey, Thomas
Date:
1857-09-16
Description:
This letter details Jervey's courtship with Elisabeth Thomas and his issues with her Grandmother, who is preventing the two from getting married. He also explains how he took a job as a bookkeeper and it pays rather well.
Collection:
Drayton Papers, 1701-2004
Contributing Institution:
Drayton Hall: A National Historic Trust Site
Media Type:
Images
Topical Subject:
Plantation life--South Carolina--History--19th century
Geographic Subject:
South Carolina, Philadelphia(Pa.), New Jersey
Language:
English
Shelving Locator:
MSS0152-B17-F19
S.C. County:
Charleston County (S.C.)
Internet Media Type:
image/jpeg
Digitization Specifications:
618 dpi, 24-bit depth, color, Epson Expression 10000XL, Archival masters are tiffs.
Copyright Status Statement:
Digital image copyright 2013, Drayton Hall: A National Historic Trust Site. All rights reserved. For more information contact Drayton Hall, Charleston, SC 29414.