Folder 02: CAA October Newsletter

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    This October "A BE FOR ADANO" PAYING OCT. 1 THROUGH OCT. 7 WHAT shall WE DO with OUR CITIES? By Henry Churchill We Present: William HASEY, FAITH MURRAY, Willard HIRSCH ART classes BEGINNING OCT. 1 MEMBERSHIP CAMPAIGN SEPT. 24 THROUGH SEPT. 29 from Carolina Art Association Charleston, S. C.
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    Something To Do If you want to go to the theatre- "A Be For Adano", by Paul Osborn will be payed on the Dock Street Theatre stage each night at 8:30, Oct. 1 through Oct. 7. Admission by membership except for visitors in the city and members of the armed forces. "Bithe Spirit", by Noe Coward will be presented by the Footight Payers each night at 8:30, Oct. 22 through Oct. 27. If you ike music- Season memberships in the Charleston Symphony Orchestra, Albert Fracht, Conductor, whose first concert will be given in Dec, are now avaiable. If you pay an instrument- Registration for the Charleston Symphony Orchestra may be made at 97 Rut- edge Ave. If you are interested in art Paintings by William Hasey, Willard Hirsch, and Faith Murray will be on view at the Gibbes Art Gallery through Oct. 1. Drawings, paintings, sculpture by students in the spring and summer art classes will be exhibited Oct. 1 through Oct. 15 at the Gallery. If you are interested in being an artist- classes for aduts and students of a ages begin at the Gibbes Art Gallery Oct. 1. If you are a movie fan- "The Vines Have Tender Grapes" and Oscar Hammerstein"s "State Fair" are coming to the Goria in October.
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    Carolina ART Association DOCK STREET THEATRE GIBBES ART Gallery CIVIC SERVICES COMMITTEE Robert N. S. Whitelaw, Director Gordon Giffen, Producing Director Mrs. Dougas wikinson, Business Manager PublicATIONS plantations of the ow Country, by Samuel Galliard Stoney; edited by Albert Simons,F.A.I.A. and Samuel apham, Jr., F.A.I.A. A Charleston Sketchbook, 1796-1806, by Charles Fraser; with introduction and Notes by Alice R. Huger Smith. This Is Charleston, text by Samuel Galliard Stoney; revised from reports to the Civic Services Committee. Charleston people cere known for the singuarity of their opinions, their diversity, and their origina reactions. A New York producer said of a recent successfu tria production at the Dock Street Theatre that he had a New York audience one night, a high School audience another, and a road complany audience a third. In spite of the tensions that war and war conditions have caused, the Charleston people have retained these quaities, and have indicated their unusuaness in many ways. The Carolina Art Association tries to refect the qualities of its members and follow the trends of their opinions. As the Public moves in thought and action the Association will move with it:-in our studies in city planning, in art and art casses, in our attempts to bring to our diversified audience a fare of entertainment that no other theatre can offer its heterogeneous membership. Whatever the Carolina Art Association is, it is because you are aware of our intentions and support us in what we do.
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    The following business men and firms have contributed to the financia support of the city planning studies of the Civic Service Committee: PATRON MEMBERS OF THE CIVIC SERVICES COMMITTEE James Aan amp; Complany, Inc., 285 King St. The Ashley Ice Cream Co., 574 Meeting St. Atantic Paint Co., Inc., 207 Meeting St. [2] Bek-Robinson Co., 232 King St. [2] Berin"s, 114 King St. William M. Bird amp; Co., Inc., 205 least Bay St. George C. Birant amp; Co., 191 King St. The Cameron amp; Barkley Co., 160 Meeting St. The Charleston Hote, 196 Meeting St. [2] Charleston OIL Co., Meeting at Mt. pleasant St. [2] Charleston Paint Co., 522 King St. Caussen Baking Co., 215 St. Phiip St. Coasta Outdoor Advertising Co., 517 Meeting St. James F. Condon amp; Sons, Inc., 431 King St. [2] Cream Crest Dairy, 578 Meeting St. least Shore Termina Co., 141 least Bay St. Edward"s, Inc., 496 King St. Eectric Suppy Co., Inc., 159 Meeting St. Fort Sumter Hote [watch newspapers for reopening] The Francis Marion Hote, 387 King St. Frost, read amp; Simons, Inc., 21 Broad St. The Geer Drug Co., 232 Meeting St. [2] The Gossard Shoppe, 306 King St. Hardy"s Office Suppy Co., 143 King St. 4
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    Hewitt amp; Maner, Inc., 91 Ashley Ave. [2] aBrasca Spaghetti and Chicken House, 973, 975 King St. M. H. azarus Co., Inc., 254 King St. egerton amp; Co., Inc., 263 King St. eRoy Jewery Co., 323 King St. [2] ureen"s Beauty Saon, 72 King St. Maybank Fertiizer Corporation, 21 Southern Home Buiding [2] William M. Means, 60 Broad St. Middeton, Inge amp; Co., 36 Broad St. Mibrens aundry amp; Dry cleaning Co., 28 Anson St. D. W. Ohandt amp; Sons, 42 Meeting St. [2] Edwin C. Owens, Mgr., Mibren"s aundry amp; Dry cleaning Co., 28 Anson St. planters Fertiizer amp; Phosphate Co., 143 least Bay St. A. F. Pringe amp; Co., 141 least Bay St. Reeves amp; Warey OIL Co., 5 Exchange St. A. G. Rhodes amp; Son, 359 King St. St. John Hote, 113 Meeting St. [2] John C. Schweers Beverage Saes Co., 38 John St. Sears, Roebuck amp; Co., 374 King St. [2] Sieging Music House, Inc., 243 King St. Sires umber Co., Inc., 737 Meeting St. [2] South Carolina Power Co., 141 Meeting St. [4] Southern Ice Co., Hayne at Church St. [2] Stevens-Cement Co., 171 Meeting St. Waker, Evans amp; Cogswe Co., 3 Broad St. [2] W C S C Radio Station, Francis Marion Hote [4] West End Dairy, 44 Bee St. W T M A Radio Station, Dock Street Theatre [4] 5
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    What shall We Do with Our Cities? The following address by Henry Churchi, A. I. A. and author of the book "The City Is The people", is reprinted by permission from the Journa of the American Institute of Architects, August, 1945. It is reprinted here because it could have the tite, "What Are We Going To Do with Charleston?" The very rough and broad outine I am going to give appies to neary a our cities, small as we as large, although of course in varying degrees and with many Localdifferences. I want to emphasize this, and to add that New York is so different, so compex and so neary insoube a problem that it should be kept out. of the discussion. Our cities are suffering from two diseases: physical decay and economic constipation. The causes of these diseases are many, and for our purposes here today, perhaps not of great importance. It is the social consequences that must concern us. The typica physical pattern of decay is a business center which is sowy deteriorating. Surrounding this is the old residential section, now largey sums and bighted, a section of mixed uses-run-down residences, tenements, small stores and factories, dog-wagons, empty ots. Beyond this come the better class of city homes and then the new areas of good midde-cass houses and the weathier suburban developments For the most part these cities are dreary and disconsolate wastes of drab streets and undistinguished structures. The better residential areas, particuary in small cities, are often redeemed by trees, shrubs and reasonable openness, but there is no such redemption where the vast majority must ive and work. We can caim itte in the way of fine architecture or effective city planning. Deight of the eye is not for us. The bight and decay of the cose-in sections, and the proonged deterioration of the business section, put a financia burden on the cities which they cannot meet. These bighted areas, for the most part tax-deinquent, must be Policed and otherwise serviced. They are, often, the centers of vice, crime, tubercuosis, syphiis, and juvenie deinquency. The outying sections must also be Policed and serviced. They pay taxes, but it would be absurd to expect them to make up for the tax-deinquent areas of sum and bight. If rea-estate taxes were boosted to that extent, there would be a general exodus beyond the city imits. It has happened. Industry has, in the past, been the chief source of municipal revenue. However, industry is also moving out of the cities, for a variety of reasons which I will mention ater. In spite of increasing bight and the trend towards the periphery, bighted and sum properties continue to be over-assessed, so that they cannot be acquired at a price consonant with new and ogica use. Consequenty, these vast areas must be eft to further decay- runnine sores on the body of the citv, poisoning it physicay, fiscally and socialy. I believe this to be a fair, although very broad and extremey generalized, statement of fact. Why has this state of affairs come about ? The chief, over-a reason, I think, ies in the fact that the industrial and mechanical technology of the last fifty years has rendered
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    our city pattern obsoete. A city exists for two things ony: it is a place in which people earn a living, and it is a place in which people ive and pay. If a city fais in either of these functions, the people, who are] the city, do something about it. Not only have our cities grown enormousy since the eary days of mass-production, but the number of cities has also increased, until by 1940 56 per cent of our people were living in cities. It was the technology of industry that prc- duced them and also produced the super-city; until the midde of the nineteenth century no city in the western word, except Ancient Rome at its peak, ever had as many as a miion inhabitants. No wonder our urban patterns are obsoete This great infux of popuation, this spawning of new cities, encouraged specuation in and- the capitaization of hope. Specuation in and encouraged and over-crowding in an effort to make the hopes come true. The development of the skyscraper and the eectric eevator, of rapid transit and sewage disposa plants, contributed mightiy to this. But the more the over-crowding, the higher the values attached to |the and, and the greater the need for more over-crowding. Then, fortunately or unfortunately, when the toerable imits of the over-crowding seemed to have been reached, along came a series of inventions that broke the back of the cities and made possible the present-day conditions of bight and bankruptcy: the automobie, the movie, the radio, the vacuum tube, the airplane, eectronics. It became possible to move out to where there was more room, more quiet, more ight, air, green, greater safety and better schooing for chidren, and at the same time to work in the city, to have the movies and good music, to maintain social contacts. people moved out. More recenty, industry has begun to do the same thing, for anaogous reasons. It seeks to escape the high costs of congested streets, insufficient parking space, obsoete factories in dingy surroundings, unheathy living conditions for empoyees. This has become possible because the motor truck has freed the factory from the rairoad, because eectric power permits it to go anywhere wires can be strung, because the airplane has brought new and imperative demands for open space, because the abor force-thanks to the cheap car-is mobie and can and does follow. ast, and not east, scattered factories in smaer units are more efficient and less vunerable to bombing. So the factories are moving out. The cities have, therefore, faied or are faiing both as places in which to ive and places in which to work. To my mind this means that a new city pattern is evoving-not the abandonment of the city or anything ike it, but a new pattern suited to the new technoogica requirements of our word of eectronics, jet-propusion and super-power. In the meantime the pight of the cities is very rea, very pressing. What will be done about it in the next few years is of the utmost importance. What is being proposed ? Again, broady and generaly, the principal proposals are, in essence, that the over-assessed, overvaued, bighted and decayed properties in our cities shall be purchased by the Federal Government, the water squeezed out, and the and then handed back to private interests to "redevelop" under more or less adequate contros by theLocalgovernment. The pattern is to
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    remain the same-pus call change pus call reste. A the urban redevelopment or rehabiitation proposals are variations on this theme; and up to now no other even remotey possible method has been proposed-possibe, that is, within the framework of our economy. These proposals do or do not make sense according to whether or not you believe that government should pay such a roe, or a greater or a esser roe vis-a-vis to private enterprise; whether or not you believe that democratic planning is possible or that planning is the road to serfdom; whether or not you believe that our present city patterns can and should be kept, or that there is something better if we want to plan and work for it. Why Off-street Parking The Civic Services Committee"s primary concern is the retention of the architectural and historic values of Charleston. We ive in a city that through accident and design has retained more fine urban architecture than can be found anywhere else in America. The committee is seeking means of having it retained with more design than accident, and has ong realized that only by city planning can it be saved as an economic asset. We seected off-street parking as one of our first projects in order that the city realize that we can develop a reaistic plan of value to the whole community. Traffic and parking is one of Charlestons worst problems, and one which must be soved. It can be soved, and we believe we have the soution. City Council has approved our plan in principe and has asked us to compete it for consideration. We have done so and will present it to Council at an eary date. CIVIC SERVICES COMMITTEE MEMBERS A. W. Allison James J. Altman Matthew B. Barkeyjr. outre Briggs E. Miby Burton E. Burnham Chamberain E. Galliard Dotterer J. Harod Easterby R. P. Edmunds Creighton Frampton George D. Grice John Mead Howes C. Bisse Jenkins, Jr. Homer M. place, Chairman Mrs. ouis P. Jervey Jack Krawcheck Edward Kronsberg Miss Mary V. McBee Frederick H. McDonad Miss Helen G. McCormack William M. Means Juian Mitchell, Jr. Mrs. W. A. Moore Mrs. Martha . Patterson Rene Ravene G. . Buist Rivers Hase E. Rivers E. Darre Jervey George C. Rogers Robert T. Rosemond Mrs. Harry M. Rubin Herbert R. Sass Albert Simons Miss Alice R. Huger Smith Samuel G. Stoney Henry P. Staats B. M. Thompson Mrs. J. I. Waring, Jr. Dr. J. I. Waring Mrs. Wilson wing 8
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    A BE FOR ADANO" Gordon Giffen taks to Bi McVey and Chester Morneau about their roes in the "Be". "CRAXI. "Advices I have are of greatest importance The people are hungry. They must eat." CACOPARDO. "He is nonsense The be, that is what they need more than anything. Aways you can eat." " "... What the book emphasizes is that the big things come from itte things. .. " -Henry Miiar "... an extraordinarily pertinent stage document as we as an absorbing entertainment. . . " -Howard Barnes
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    The transcript is not currently available for this item.
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    r Association r 1945-46 CIVIC SERVICES COMMITTEE Studies in city planning A channel for expression on community affairs i " -" ,9 ,Jr I A Sum bordering King Street. The space it occupies would be of greater economic value if used for off-street parking. Off-street parking and continuous city planning studies are the only solution to congestion such as this.
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    Carolina ART Association Do You Know ? The Carolina Art Association operates on a season membership basis. only visitors in the City and members of the armed forces may buy tickets to plays at the Dock Street Theatre. only members are entitled to a 20 reduction in price of tuition to art classes and in admission to special attractions. The membership is limited to a number which can be accommodated in a week"s run of a play at the Theatre. A residents of this area are invited to enroll as members, until this number is reached. Members of the armed forces and their families are invited to join for the season, with the privilege of obtaining a refund if transferred. classes of membership are: annual $6.00. Contributing $10.00. Sustaining $25.00. annual patron $100.00. life member $500.00. Benefactor $1000.00 MEMBERSHIP CAMPAIGN A OF NEXT WEEK Membership ros will be open through the run of "A Be For Adanp", unless the quota of members is reached before that time. Seats may be reserved for "A Be For Adano" beginning next Thursday. The Box Office will be open: Thursday, Friday, Saturday-10 to 5. Monday through Saturday-10 to 6, 7 to 9. Sunday, Oct. 7-6 to 9. Admission: Members free. Visitors $1.65 [incuding 25c Federal tax, 13c City tax]. Enlisted men 33c [incuding 5c Federal tax, 3c City tax]. Reservations may be made by telephone and mail BUT TICKETS MUST BE CAllED FOR BY 6 ON NIGHTS OF ATTENDANCE No tickets will be held after 6 P. M. 12
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    WE Present William Halsey - FAITH MURRAY - Willard HIRSCH Paintings and sculpture on exhibit through Oct. 1 Art classes beginning Oct. 1 William Halsey, of Charleston, attended the University of South Carolina for two years and then studied at the School of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts. There he studied with the Russian artist, Iacoveff, and Kar Zerbe. He gave up bis position as instructor in fresco painting and assistant instructor of drawing and painting to accept the Schoo"s highest award, the James Paige schoarship. Due to the beginning of the war Mr. Halsey was unable to travel in Europe; instead he spent two years studying and painting in Mexico. His Mexican paintings and those of his wife, [Corrie McCallum] were exhibited in his studio here in 1941. His "plan of a Painting" is in the permanent collection of the Gibbes Art Gallery, and is on view at the present time. His works are also represented in the collections of the Tefair Academy, Savannah, and the University of Georgia art department. He has had one-man shows at the Mint Museum, the University of Georgia, West Palm Beach, and Savannah, and has exhibited in Boston, Mexico City, Charleston, in the Chicago watercolor exhibits of 1939, "41, "42, "43. One of his paintings was awarded the Southern States Art League prize. In 1944 he won first prize in the watercolor exhibition by the Mint Museum, and in 1945 an honorable mention. Mr. Halsey was an instructor at the Tefair Academy in 1942-"43. In 1943 he went to work at the shipyard in Savannah where he has been until his recent return to Charleston. He plans to have a studio here, and will be an instructor in painting at the Gibbes Art Gallery. Faith Murray, of Charleston and Edisto Island, studied at Fairmount College in Monteage, Tennessee, with Jean Feming at Ashley Hall, and with Arthur Dow at Columbia University. She has painted and exhibited mainly on the least coast. Her work is represented in the permanent collections in Columbia, Augusta, and Charleston. She has been an art instructor for a good part of her career. Her first class was on Edisto Island. Since the war began she has worked as draftsman in the engineering department of Santee Cooper and as marine draftsman at the Charleston Shipbuiding and Drydock complany for two years. last season she resumed teaching classes at the Gibbes Art Gallery. Willard Hirsch, of Charleston, moved to New York in the eary 30"s. He studied at the national Academy of Design and the Beaux Arts Institute of Design. His works are represented in the permanent collection of the InterNational Business Machine"s "Scupture of the Western Hemisphere", at incon Hospital, Bureau of Chid Guidance, and other places in New York. He has exhibited at the national Academy of Design, the Corcoran, the Metropolitan, the national sculpture Society. He was in the army from 1942 to December, 1944, during which time he did a head of general Burress, Governor Johnston, and others. Upon his dischlarge he returned to Charleston and has a studio at 17 Exchange Street. He instructed classes in drawing and sculpture at the Gibbes Art Gallery last year. 13
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    Casses In Drawing, Painting, sculpture Beginning Oct. 1 For Aduts Willard Hirsch will instruct a class in drawing and sculpture each Tuesday evening, 8 to 9:30 o clock. William Halsey will instruct a class in painting each Wednesday evening, 8 to 9:30 o clock. Willard Hirsch will instruct a class in drawing and sculpture each Thursday evening, 8 to 9:30 o clock. If there is a sufficient number of students to fill a morning painting class Mr. Halsey will organize one. For children of 6 to 8 years William Halsey will teach a class in drawing and painting each Monday afternoon, 3 to 4:30 o clock. William Halsey will teach a class in drawing and painting each Tuesday afternoon, 3 to 4:30 o clock. For children of 9 to 13 years Faith Murray will teach a class in drawing and painting each Thursday afternoon, 3 to 4:30 o clock. For children of 9 to 18 years Willard Hirsch will instruct a class .in sculpture each Friday afternoon, 3 to 4:30 o clock. For Students of 14 to 18 years William Halsey will instruct a class in drawing and painting each Wednesday afternoon, 3 to 4:30 o clock. REGISTRATION OPEN NOW THROUGH SEPT. 30 APPY TO GIBBES ART Gallery Fifteen week term begins Monday, Oct. 1. Each class limited to 20 students. Members of the Carolina Art As.- socialtion are entitled to a reduction in tuition of approximatey 20. TUITION PAYable IN ADVANCE children of 6 to 8 years $5 for term children of members $4 for term Students over 8 years and Aduts, [except adult scupture. students] $13 for term Members $10.40 for term adult sculpture students $15 for term Members $12 for term 1945 Summer School Art classes by Faith. Murray The summer art classes were fun. We had fun-the kind that is derived from a sense of earning to do the thing you ove best to do. We met two mornings a week for nine weeks. We painted anywhere it struck our fancy-by the poo, under the trees, on the grass, from the stone terrace and steps into the ha, and sometimes in the cassroom. We had plenty of paper and brushes and beautifu coors with which to experiment- and experiment we did. To paint, one must paint. To buid an appreciation of coor, Line and form, design, etc. one must ex- 14
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    perience these things-not read about them. Our course was designed so that this experience could be had, and at the same time a knowledge of technique reaized. The art that children produce has a quality a its own. To appreciate it one must know how to see it. A five-year-od artist, for exampe, is not the least bit interested in what the outside word looks ike. He will cover a llarge sheet of paper with a bold design and calmly confide to you that "it"s rain faing down our chimney". To us grown people-we, we see no rain or chimney; but there is a beautifuy developed design freely expressed with unaffected coors, a success from the artist"s point of view but certainy a disappointment to those ooking for representation. To hep children retain their creative ability that is so easiy covered up by their copy-cat instincts is a major probem. The method of teaching eeven- year-ods is quite different. No two ages are aike. The sense of design and the feeling for the thing- as-a-whole diminishes with years and must be carefully coaxed into pay again. The oder children got a ot of excitement out of earning to sketch from nature. We showed them reations of basic shape to trees, houses, etc. Sometimes they would sketch, then use their new knowledge in their own creative way. This, of course, was the idea. We hope you will enjoy these "works of art". Some will be shown with the fall exhibition this month. We produced about three hundred, so we had plenty to select from. We want to thank the very fine persons who vounteered their assistance and made it possible for the instructors to give their undivided attention to teaching. The Arts The first exhibit scheduled for this season at the Gibbes Art Gallery is the work of three resident artists, Faith Murray, William Hasey, and Willard Hirsch. The three were born in Charleston, went their diversified ways, and having earned their craftsmanship and gained recognition in other places, have returned to practice their art at home. The Carolina Art Association has the peasure of announcing Mrs. Murray, Mr. Hasey, and Mr. Hirsch as instructors of classes in drawing, painting, and sculpture at the Gibbes Art Gallery this season. Mrs. Murray and Mr. Hirsch instructed classes last season. Mr. Halsey has joined them, and the three have hastiy assembed an exhibit of their paintings and sculpture known at the Gallery as the "Instructors" Exhibit" which will be on view through Sept. 31. This exhibit will be followed by the showing of a selection of drawings, paintings, and sculpture done by students in the Gallery art classes during the spring and summer terms. The work of aduts and children will be incuded. These will be on view Oct. 1 through Oct. 15. Portraits from the permanent collection of the Art Association have been arranged by Samuel Galliard Stoney in the main Gallery upstairs. The arrangement illustrates the history of South Carolina through its portraiture. It is arranged chronologically , and will be treated topically with explanatory ables. 15
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    Transportation Corps. Art Exhibit On October 20 through the 26th, the Gibbes Art Gallery will exhibit an historical panorama of paintings depicting the work of the U. S. Army Transportation Corps in Word War II. A the paintings are by the young artist Sgt. David ax, a member of the Grand central Gallery of New York. ax"s Transportation Corps" planorama has already been exhibited at the Carnegie Institute, Toronto Art Museum, the Corcoran Museum of Washington, D. C. and the Gaerie Borghese in Paris. ax"s pictures are one of the few exhibits of combat art which is concerned excusivey with a singe Army organization. Yet they depict widely varied, though typica scenes: men at ports, on highways, at rairoad stations, troops loading on D-Day, the anding at Normandy, men drifting away from their burning tug, men first frightened, then calm at their initial encounter with death and devastation. Perhaps one reaction to these art documents might be: where are the shrieking battes and its surges of heroism? The answer is that they come after such scenes as these. Battes cannot occur until an Army is suppied. This collection portrays vividy the routines by which astronomica quantities of shes, gasoine, food, howitzers, tanks, cothing were shifted and re-shifted, sometimes within an hour"s notice, throughout the bitte battle of Europe. In his paintings, ax has sensitivey portrayed the transportation. G.I. Art and accuracy has been combined but art has given away whenever there was a confict. ax has not induged in fraduent excitement or exaggeration. At the age of 31, the young Army artist"s paintings have entitled him to a place in "Who"s Who in America". Such men as Irving Mis and Water Gifford have originas of ax"s civiian works in their private coection. Music on the Air Sunday afternoon is symphony music time for Charlestonians, with two fine concerts over WCSC. From 2 to 2:30 there"s the Strad- avari Orchestra, directed by Paul avae, and from 3 to 4:30 you can enjoy a fu hour and a haf of the beoved Phiharmonic. Arthur Rod- zinski is conductor this season, and guest conductors will be Bruno Waters, George Sze, Igor Stravinsky. The season opens October 7, with Beethoven"s Ninth Symphony. Whether you"re a keen symphony istener or simpy ike a soft background to a quiet Sunday afternoon, you" find both these programs more than worth your hoiday-istening. At 4:30 you may prefer a ighter musica fare. Neson Eddy is back on the Eectric Hour with a bright new program of ight, but not frivoous music, featuring stars as popuar as himsef. Sunday will not be compete until you have heard the meodious tones of James Meton on Texaco"s Star 16
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    Theatre. WCSC carries the program from 9:30 to 10 o clock. . During the week, we recommend that you isten to the American Meody Hour, Tuesday at 7:30 o clock; Great Moments in Music on Wednesday evening at 10; and the music of Andre Kosteanetz Thursday at 9 o clock. Fok Dancing Do you ike good old American square dancing? Do the dances of the peoples of other countries intrigue you? Or are you just crazy about dancing, any kind ? For the past two years men and women with interests such as these have attended the weeky sessions of the Square Dance Group, usually held on Wednesdays in the gym of the YWCA. Again this year the group will be active and anyone interested is wecome to attend and earn the dances, a dances are taught. The dances range in variety from the energetic square, "Forward up Six and Back" and the fashy Russian "Kohanochka" to the gracefu "Splanish Watz". The group earns numbers as simiar in formation but as different in spirit as the fast and furious Danish "Crested Hen", the gaoping Russian "Troika" and the American "Pop Goes the Wease". Among the favorite dances are the "Varsouvianna", the "Mexican Watz", the smooth "Back Nag" of England, and the square, "The Splanish Cabaero". These numbers will be included among the dances this year. Book Discussions The Charleston County Free ibrary"s book discussion evenings begin this year on Monday night, October 8, and will be held in the main buiding of the ibrary beginning at 9 p.m. As usua the book discussions will be held on the second Monday night of each month. In response to popuar demand the committee which plans the book discussion evenings expects to pubish ater a tentative program for the year, announcing the books to be reviewed each month. Among the books which may be chosen for discussion are several books of current interest, books of non-fiction as we as noves. On the tentative ist of non-fiction are: Owen attimore"s solution in Asia, which stresses the importance of Asia and China in present and future word poitics; Friedrich August von Hayek"s The Road to Serfdom, which warns against a too stricty planned economy; Bernard Newman"s Bakan Background, describing the situation in the Bakans and suggesting better methods of handing it; and Edmund Stevens" Russia Is No Ridde, a report on Russia today and its intentions toward the rest of the word. The plan of the book discussion programs during the past two years has been to present books which are controversia and provocative of discussion, chiefy books on subjects of current interest. The programs usually begin with a short review of the book and following this the members of the plane give their sometimes widely divergent points of view concerning the subjects mentioned in the book. After this the audience is invited to take part in the discussion and it is at this juncture that sparks often fy and the moderator is sometimes hard put to it to keep things smooth. Theatre On the Air The Peabody Radio Award winner, "Cavacade of America," has a great 1945-1946 program schedue. This true-to-life dramatic pro- 17
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    gram is heard every Monday night from 8:00 to 8:30 over WTMA. Produced on the theory that great stars make great programs, "Cavacade" is presenting this season such artists as Charles aughton, Cark Gable, Water Pidgeon, Rosaind Russe, Burgess Meredith. On "Cavacade" these actors and actresses in characterizations of the most briiant figures of the past and present. Another series of dramatizations which we recommend for those who ove good acting, skifu direction, and thriing suspense is NBC"s interpretations of "The Word"s Great Noves." This series started in September with the first of six dramatizations of Tostoi"s outstanding work, War and Peace. This will be followed by Mark Twain"s Huckeberry Pinn, Rheade"s The Coister and the Hearth, Bunyan"s Pigrim"s Progress. Hugo"s Ninety- Three, Dostoevski"s Crime and Punishment, Sterne"s Tristram Shandy, and France"s Crime of Syvestre Bonnard. The program is heard every Friday night at 11:30 P. M. Corneia Otis Skinner, ong a queen of the egitimate stage, has taken to the air. Every Tuesday night at 8:00 P. M., Miss Skinner and Roand Young appear as the witty, urbane coupe in the "wiiam and Mary" skits written by the versatie Miss Skinner. And the biggest October radio news is that Fred Aen and his whole complany return to NBC with a new comedy session on Sunday, October 7, at 8:30 P. M. What They Do In The Daytime Chester Morneau: ieutenant Coone, C-54 schoo, Charleston Army Air Fied. Bi McVey: Emcee announcer, eary morning shows, WTMA. David Bresser: Credit manager, Cart Jewery Co. Charles Cooidge: Representing Investors Syndicate. Robert Cohen: Corpora, Charleston Army Air Fied. Catsten Jantzen: student at the High School of Charleston. en Henrichsen: ieutenant U.S.N.R. District headquarters. Bi Hemingway: Contro operator, WTMA. Karon Armacost: wife of Ensign J. F. Armacost and script writer at WCSC. Marguirette Dion: Secretary and notary Public, Charleston Army Air Fied. Grace Nimmer: Grace Nimmer Dress Shop, 66 C Hase Street. Kenneth Hanus: ieutenant, U. S. Public health Service Mosquito Contro. Traynor Ferio: Recreation Director for Charleston Navy Yard, and privately Director of Studio of Stage Training. Travis Pooe: Sergeant, Charleston Army Air Fied. D. A. Figiorei: with Gamein"s Restaurant. Antonia Manos: wife of T. D. Manos and assistant supervisor of examination section, personne dept., Navy Yard. 18
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    Dock Street Theatre presents "A BE FOR ADANO" by Paul Osborn Adapted from a nove by John Hersey Produced under the direction of Gordon Giffen Major Victor Joppoo Chester Morneau Sgt. eonard Borth, M. P Bi McVey Zito [Giovanni], usher David Bresser Ribaudo [Giuseppe] Charles Cooidge Cacopardo, a resident Robert Cohen Craxi, a resident Ben Nettes Bi Munroe, M. P-Carsten Jantzen Father Pensovecchio A. G. D. wies Sgt. Frank Traplani, M. P en Henrichsen Cp. Chuck Schutz, M. P Bi Hemingway Joe Poack, M. P Ear Potter Tina, Daughter of Tomasino Karon Armacost Gargano, Chief of Carabinieri Jerry Bea Vita Margherita, a resident Antonia Manos Carmeina, a resident Marguirette Dion aura [Sofia], a resident Grace Nimmer Afronti [Pietro], cart driver Kenneth Hanus Erba [Caro], cart driver Bi Hemingway Nasta, former Mavor Traynor Ferio Tomasino, Head Fisherman D. A. Figiorei t. livingston, U. S. Navy Travis Pooe SYNOPSIS" OF SCENES Time: Juy, 1943 The scene is the same throughout the pay. It is the former office of the Mayor in the City Hall of Adano, Siciy; and a smaer office, an anteroom. Act I Scene 1. Midday. Scene 2. Five days ater. Morning. Scene 3. Two days ater. Mid-afternoon. Act n Scene 1. A few days ater. late afternoon. Scene 2. A week ater. Eary morning. Act in Scene 1. A few days ater. Morning. Scene 2. Some hours ater. late afternoon.
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    Pay No. 1 Week of Oct. 1 "A BE FOR ADANO" features Chester Morneau-no doubt the first ieutenant Coone ever to pay the part of a Major. Karon Armacost-whom you will never recognize as the former Mrs. Rocket in "Fumed Oak", payed last spring. Bi McVey-formery in nava aviation, now back in service on the stage as a tough army sergeant. Charles Cooidge-originay a New Englander, currently a Charleston- ian, and for this week only an Itaian. D. A. Figiorei-who was born in Itay and pays the roe of Tomasino. Production Assistants Stage Manager: Jane Morneau Scene Buiding and Painting: Emore itchfied, en Henrichsen, Ben Nettes, Jr., Ewood Thompson, David Crockett. I. A. T. S. E.: Phiip Minges, J. O. Beding, Carro Phiips. TRYOUTS FOR PAY No. 2 Tuesday, Oct. 9 readings will begin at 8 o clock, in the Greenroom WATCH THE PRESS FOR ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE PAY SEECTED
Title:
Folder 02: CAA October Newsletter
Date:
1945
Description:
Background materials related to the Civic Service Committee's preservation and urban planning efforts in Charleston.
Collection:
Civic Services Committee Papers
Contributing Institution:
Margaretta Childs Archives at Historic Charleston Foundation
Media Type:
Manuscripts
Personal or Corporate Subject:
Civic Services Committee, Civic Services Committee--Records and correspondence, Civic Services Committee--Membership, Carolina Art Association, Civic Services Committee--Finance
Topical Subject:
City planning--United States, City Planning--South Carolina--Charleston, Historic preservation--South Carolina--Charleston
Series:
Folder 02: CSC History, Objectives, Background Materials
Shelving Locator:
HCF 001
S.C. County:
Charleston County (S.C.)
Material Type:
image/jpeg
Digitization Specifications:
300 ppi, 24-bit depth, color, Epson Expression 10000XL, Archival Masters are tiffs.
Copyright Status Statement:
Digital image copyright 2009, Historic Charleston Foundation. All rights reserved. For more information contact Margaretta Childs Archives at HCF, PO Box 1120, Charleston, SC 29402.