Folder 02: “Planning in Charleston”

  • Image 01
    planning IN Charleston June 28, 1945 The first concerted endeavor toward scientific planningg in Charleston in modern times was made by the city government in 1931 during the administration of Mayor Thomas P. Stoney. intimately concerned in this endeavor were James O"Hear, Co. Aston Deas and Major Albert Simons. Morris-Knowes, a planning and engineering firm of Phiadephia, made the studies end executed the master plan for the city. The Zoning ordinances - associated in the Public mind only with preservation of two small areas of "od and historic Charleston," but actuay embracing zoning matters throughout the entire city - were adopted by City Council at that time. The City planning and Zoning Commission, the Board of architectural Review and the Board of Adjustment were created to administer the ordinances. unfortunately, for the ordinances attracted wide attention and approva, the only paid city official concerned with it was the City Engineer whose office was already overburdened. No city appropriation has been avaiable for planning since 1931. The next move toward planning was made by a small group of individuals eary in 1940. The group included E. Miby Burton, John Mead Howes, James O"Hear, Homer M. place, Sidney J. Rittenberg, Albert Simons, Miss Alice R. Huger Smith, Samuel G. Stoney and Robert N. S. Whitelaw. This group ater became the Civic Services Committee. It has become apparent to many that the "distinctive and charming amenity" of Charleston was threatened by loss and change brought about through ignorance, indifference, economic necessity, and the mere pressure of living. The committee therefore studied the effects of i-considered restorations and haphazard explansion, upon things that are historically, architecturally or estheticay important and with these problems of traffic, housing, recreation, etc., as they affected the physical appearance and cultural values of the city. The Civic Services Committee was sponsored by the Carolina Art Association in order that it receive financia support from individuals and foundations. It appied for and received two grants from the Carnegie Corporation of New York; one of $600, which was used to obtain a piot study for a city plan from Frederick aw Olmstead, one of the country"s outstanding city planners and andscape architects; and one of $2400. The second grant was used to empoy a secretary, Miss Helen G. McCormack, who, with the committee, made an architectural survey of the city. Next in the planning sequence, the national Resources planning Board, represented in this area by George W. Simons, Jr., interested Senator Cotsworth P. Means and the County Deegation in securing egisative action to estabish a county planning board. This board was created in Juy, 1942 and was given a county appropriation. It terminated its activities when the appropriation was not made in June, 1945. [End Page 1] The Civic Services Committee, begun in 1949, has continued with a greaty enlarged membership. Its first members were a either architectural historians or individuals professionay concerned with the cultural life of the city. Their objective was and still is to devise ways and means of preserving as much as possible of Charlestons unique architecture, not in any sense as static museum pieces, but as usefu parts of a living community potentialy of enormous value to the city as a whole. The committee eary realized that city planning was the only method of accompishing this, and that a aspects of the life of the community must be considered. The enlarged membership of the committee has therefore been drawn from a interests, social and economic as we as cultural. There are no requirements of membership except civic interest and civic contribution. The committee now numbers 53 and is assisted by a metropolitan Council of 96 members. The Rockefeller Foundation, interested in the sponsorship of the Carolina Art Associaltion, made a three year grant to the work of the Civic Services Committee totaing $24,000 in May of 1942. They were interested primarily in the fact of the Art Associaltion"s desire to demonstrate that it could render a usefu service to the community. The Foundation has atey stated that the Art Association has done more toward determining new fieds of usefuness than any simiar institution in the country. The Chamber of Commerce announced its Post War planning Committee in the fall of 1943. Officias of the Chamber were invited to attend a meeting of the Civic Services Committee in October of that year and the division of responsibiity of the two organizations was freely and fuy discussed. The Post War planning Committee announced its intention of securing $135,000 for a three year budget. $162,000 has been secured, including $35,000 appropriated by the County Deegation. Officias of the Committee and the Chamber of Commerce are of the opinion that this sum must be used in its entirety for industrial development although they have included Civic Affairs in their program. In December, 1943 George W. Simons, Jr was engaged by the Civic Services Committee as planning consutant. His report of that month was printed and distributed to a interested parties including a members of the Post War planning Committee The Civic Services Committee has continued to retain the services of Mr. Simons since December, 1943, and has atey added Henry P. Staats, AIA to its staff It has pubished and distributed, through the generous sponsorship of 182 of Charlestons businessmen, 5,000 copies of its architectural survey, "This Is Charleston." A second edition of 5,000, sponsored by 122 individuals and firms, is now being printed Mr. Simons has been used largey to organize vounteer committees to make a thorough study of traffic conditions in Charleston and to anayze their findings. It was expected that the organization and experience of these committees would be -2- [End Page 2] vauable for ater studies. Over 1,000 individuals have contributed to this study which ed to an invitation to appear before City Council in March, 1945 to present a plan for off- street parking areas for the central business district. At that time City Council passed a resoution commending the plan in principe and asking the Civic Services Committee to continue its studies in connection with the City planning and Zoning Commission. Engineering studies are now being competed in order that the off-street parking plan can be submitted, compete in a detais, to City Council in September. The Civic Services Committee has expended $38,000 and has realized that Additional funds would be necessary to maintain its staff after October 1, 1945, but at no time in the past two years was it prepared to seek funds in confict with, or in competition with, the Post War planning Committee. It was hoped that the atter Committee would, when its funds were secured, utiize the experience of the Civic Services Committee which proposed that it serve as research and planning Consultant for the physical planning of the area if this were undertaken by the Post War planning Committee. The proposa has been rejected but is to be reconsidered. In order that funds expended and experience gained not be ost, the Civic Services Committee has decided to continue to function in the following matters: 1. To compete the studies reative to off-street parking for the central business area. Vounteer research has been competed and staff and Consultant saaries are budgeted to October 1. $5,000 is necessaryi however to compete engiamp;gt; neering studies and property appraisas 2. To retain its organization and identity and serve wherever possible as Consultant or advisor on a physical improvements or egisation reative to them for a organizations or commissions in the area. 3.. To maintain a staff and engage consutants if funds are avaiable, for the following. a. Tim development and continua maintenance of and overa area.plan, if this is not undertaken and continued by any other agency. b. To assist the Board of architectural review in remodeing problems by furnishing architectural consutants. c. To impement wherever possible the work of other organizations interested in preservation of architecturally or historically important buildings or areas beieving that this activity is of great economic value to the area. d. To study and suggest egisation necessary to area planning or preservation. 4. To formuate plans for the creation of a Charleston Foundation to carry out: a. Area planning studies continuousy. b. To receive funds for investment by purchase or mortgage of architecturally or historically important buildings-. -3- [End Page 3] c. .To administer gifts of important buildings in coaboration with other organizations. d. To own or contro by mortgage and to rehabiitate important buildings utiizing them for residential, business or Public purposes. e. To devise plans with city and Federal agencies for ow cost housing projects which would use existing fine buildings. 5. To study the possibiity of and to conduct experiments toward the estabishment of a new institution in Charleston to serve the Southeastern area. The end products of most industry are things of usefuness to individuals and an institution devoted to design experiments, consumer acceptance and development would serve a usefu purpose reated to industry and the promoi tiona idea of the Chamber of Commerce in attracting industry. The institution would serve as follows: a. . Through exhibitions and demonstrations of the industrial products of the area. b. Through exhibitions and demonstrations of the potential use of the raw materias of the area. c. Through the estabishment of a design and development aboratory working with industries of the area. d. Through education to conserve and propery use the raw materias of the area. Budget for a 3 year period 1945 - Engineering studies and property appraisas reative to off-street parking 1945-46 Director [remainder of saary paid by C A. A.] architectural Consultant Engineering amp; planning Consultant Other Consultant fees amp; travel Exhibition designer amp; technician Draftsman Secretary Exhibition suppies amp; incidentas 1946-47 Same 1947-48 Director architectural Consultant Exhibition designer amp; technician Draftsman Secretary Consutant"-, fees, exhibition, .demonstration amp;.incidenta $5,000 $2000 3200 2400 3600 3000 2400 1800 Jamp;QQ. 20,000 20,000 $2000 3200 3000 2400 1800 .26.00 15.000 , $60,000 [End Page 4]
  • Image 01
    planning IN Charleston June 28, 1945 The first concerted endeavor toward scientific planningg in Charleston in modern times was made by the city government in 1931 during the administration of Mayor Thomas P. Stoney. intimately concerned in this endeavor were James O"Hear, Co. Aston Deas and Major Albert Simons. Morris-Knowes, a planning and engineering firm of Phiadephia, made the studies end executed the master plan for the city. The Zoning ordinances - associated in the Public mind only with preservation of two small areas of "od and historic Charleston," but actuay embracing zoning matters throughout the entire city - were adopted by City Council at that time. The City planning and Zoning Commission, the Board of architectural Review and the Board of Adjustment were created to administer the ordinances. unfortunately, for the ordinances attracted wide attention and approva, the only paid city official concerned with it was the City Engineer whose office was already overburdened. No city appropriation has been avaiable for planning since 1931. The next move toward planning was made by a small group of individuals eary in 1940. The group included E. Miby Burton, John Mead Howes, James O"Hear, Homer M. place, Sidney J. Rittenberg, Albert Simons, Miss Alice R. Huger Smith, Samuel G. Stoney and Robert N. S. Whitelaw. This group ater became the Civic Services Committee. It has become apparent to many that the "distinctive and charming amenity" of Charleston was threatened by loss and change brought about through ignorance, indifference, economic necessity, and the mere pressure of living. The committee therefore studied the effects of i-considered restorations and haphazard explansion, upon things that are historically, architecturally or estheticay important and with these problems of traffic, housing, recreation, etc., as they affected the physical appearance and cultural values of the city. The Civic Services Committee was sponsored by the Carolina Art Association in order that it receive financia support from individuals and foundations. It appied for and received two grants from the Carnegie Corporation of New York; one of $600, which was used to obtain a piot study for a city plan from Frederick aw Olmstead, one of the country"s outstanding city planners and andscape architects; and one of $2400. The second grant was used to empoy a secretary, Miss Helen G. McCormack, who, with the committee, made an architectural survey of the city. Next in the planning sequence, the national Resources planning Board, represented in this area by George W. Simons, Jr., interested Senator Cotsworth P. Means and the County Deegation in securing egisative action to estabish a county planning board. This board was created in Juy, 1942 and was given a county appropriation. It terminated its activities when the appropriation was not made in June, 1945. [End Page 1] The Civic Services Committee, begun in 1949, has continued with a greaty enlarged membership. Its first members were a either architectural historians or individuals professionay concerned with the cultural life of the city. Their objective was and still is to devise ways and means of preserving as much as possible of Charlestons unique architecture, not in any sense as static museum pieces, but as usefu parts of a living community potentialy of enormous value to the city as a whole. The committee eary realized that city planning was the only method of accompishing this, and that a aspects of the life of the community must be considered. The enlarged membership of the committee has therefore been drawn from a interests, social and economic as we as cultural. There are no requirements of membership except civic interest and civic contribution. The committee now numbers 53 and is assisted by a metropolitan Council of 96 members. The Rockefeller Foundation, interested in the sponsorship of the Carolina Art Associaltion, made a three year grant to the work of the Civic Services Committee totaing $24,000 in May of 1942. They were interested primarily in the fact of the Art Associaltion"s desire to demonstrate that it could render a usefu service to the community. The Foundation has atey stated that the Art Association has done more toward determining new fieds of usefuness than any simiar institution in the country. The Chamber of Commerce announced its Post War planning Committee in the fall of 1943. Officias of the Chamber were invited to attend a meeting of the Civic Services Committee in October of that year and the division of responsibiity of the two organizations was freely and fuy discussed. The Post War planning Committee announced its intention of securing $135,000 for a three year budget. $162,000 has been secured, including $35,000 appropriated by the County Deegation. Officias of the Committee and the Chamber of Commerce are of the opinion that this sum must be used in its entirety for industrial development although they have included Civic Affairs in their program. In December, 1943 George W. Simons, Jr was engaged by the Civic Services Committee as planning consutant. His report of that month was printed and distributed to a interested parties including a members of the Post War planning Committee The Civic Services Committee has continued to retain the services of Mr. Simons since December, 1943, and has atey added Henry P. Staats, AIA to its staff It has pubished and distributed, through the generous sponsorship of 182 of Charlestons businessmen, 5,000 copies of its architectural survey, "This Is Charleston." A second edition of 5,000, sponsored by 122 individuals and firms, is now being printed Mr. Simons has been used largey to organize vounteer committees to make a thorough study of traffic conditions in Charleston and to anayze their findings. It was expected that the organization and experience of these committees would be -2- [End Page 2] vauable for ater studies. Over 1,000 individuals have contributed to this study which ed to an invitation to appear before City Council in March, 1945 to present a plan for off- street parking areas for the central business district. At that time City Council passed a resoution commending the plan in principe and asking the Civic Services Committee to continue its studies in connection with the City planning and Zoning Commission. Engineering studies are now being competed in order that the off-street parking plan can be submitted, compete in a detais, to City Council in September. The Civic Services Committee has expended $38,000 and has realized that Additional funds would be necessary to maintain its staff after October 1, 1945, but at no time in the past two years was it prepared to seek funds in confict with, or in competition with, the Post War planning Committee. It was hoped that the atter Committee would, when its funds were secured, utiize the experience of the Civic Services Committee which proposed that it serve as research and planning Consultant for the physical planning of the area if this were undertaken by the Post War planning Committee. The proposa has been rejected but is to be reconsidered. In order that funds expended and experience gained not be ost, the Civic Services Committee has decided to continue to function in the following matters: 1. To compete the studies reative to off-street parking for the central business area. Vounteer research has been competed and staff and Consultant saaries are budgeted to October 1. $5,000 is necessaryi however to compete engiamp;gt; neering studies and property appraisas 2. To retain its organization and identity and serve wherever possible as Consultant or advisor on a physical improvements or egisation reative to them for a organizations or commissions in the area. 3.. To maintain a staff and engage consutants if funds are avaiable, for the following. a. Tim development and continua maintenance of and overa area.plan, if this is not undertaken and continued by any other agency. b. To assist the Board of architectural review in remodeing problems by furnishing architectural consutants. c. To impement wherever possible the work of other organizations interested in preservation of architecturally or historically important buildings or areas beieving that this activity is of great economic value to the area. d. To study and suggest egisation necessary to area planning or preservation. 4. To formuate plans for the creation of a Charleston Foundation to carry out: a. Area planning studies continuousy. b. To receive funds for investment by purchase or mortgage of architecturally or historically important buildings-. -3- [End Page 3] c. .To administer gifts of important buildings in coaboration with other organizations. d. To own or contro by mortgage and to rehabiitate important buildings utiizing them for residential, business or Public purposes. e. To devise plans with city and Federal agencies for ow cost housing projects which would use existing fine buildings. 5. To study the possibiity of and to conduct experiments toward the estabishment of a new institution in Charleston to serve the Southeastern area. The end products of most industry are things of usefuness to individuals and an institution devoted to design experiments, consumer acceptance and development would serve a usefu purpose reated to industry and the promoi tiona idea of the Chamber of Commerce in attracting industry. The institution would serve as follows: a. . Through exhibitions and demonstrations of the industrial products of the area. b. Through exhibitions and demonstrations of the potential use of the raw materias of the area. c. Through the estabishment of a design and development aboratory working with industries of the area. d. Through education to conserve and propery use the raw materias of the area. Budget for a 3 year period 1945 - Engineering studies and property appraisas reative to off-street parking 1945-46 Director [remainder of saary paid by C A. A.] architectural Consultant Engineering amp; planning Consultant Other Consultant fees amp; travel Exhibition designer amp; technician Draftsman Secretary Exhibition suppies amp; incidentas 1946-47 Same 1947-48 Director architectural Consultant Exhibition designer amp; technician Draftsman Secretary Consutant"-, fees, exhibition, .demonstration amp;.incidenta $5,000 $2000 3200 2400 3600 3000 2400 1800 Jamp;QQ. 20,000 20,000 $2000 3200 3000 2400 1800 .26.00 15.000 , $60,000 [End Page 4]
  • Image 01
    planning IN Charleston June 28, 1945 The first concerted endeavor toward scientific planningg in Charleston in modern times was made by the city government in 1931 during the administration of Mayor Thomas P. Stoney. intimately concerned in this endeavor were James O"Hear, Co. Aston Deas and Major Albert Simons. Morris-Knowes, a planning and engineering firm of Phiadephia, made the studies end executed the master plan for the city. The Zoning ordinances - associated in the Public mind only with preservation of two small areas of "od and historic Charleston," but actuay embracing zoning matters throughout the entire city - were adopted by City Council at that time. The City planning and Zoning Commission, the Board of architectural Review and the Board of Adjustment were created to administer the ordinances. unfortunately, for the ordinances attracted wide attention and approva, the only paid city official concerned with it was the City Engineer whose office was already overburdened. No city appropriation has been avaiable for planning since 1931. The next move toward planning was made by a small group of individuals eary in 1940. The group included E. Miby Burton, John Mead Howes, James O"Hear, Homer M. place, Sidney J. Rittenberg, Albert Simons, Miss Alice R. Huger Smith, Samuel G. Stoney and Robert N. S. Whitelaw. This group ater became the Civic Services Committee. It has become apparent to many that the "distinctive and charming amenity" of Charleston was threatened by loss and change brought about through ignorance, indifference, economic necessity, and the mere pressure of living. The committee therefore studied the effects of i-considered restorations and haphazard explansion, upon things that are historically, architecturally or estheticay important and with these problems of traffic, housing, recreation, etc., as they affected the physical appearance and cultural values of the city. The Civic Services Committee was sponsored by the Carolina Art Association in order that it receive financia support from individuals and foundations. It appied for and received two grants from the Carnegie Corporation of New York; one of $600, which was used to obtain a piot study for a city plan from Frederick aw Olmstead, one of the country"s outstanding city planners and andscape architects; and one of $2400. The second grant was used to empoy a secretary, Miss Helen G. McCormack, who, with the committee, made an architectural survey of the city. Next in the planning sequence, the national Resources planning Board, represented in this area by George W. Simons, Jr., interested Senator Cotsworth P. Means and the County Deegation in securing egisative action to estabish a county planning board. This board was created in Juy, 1942 and was given a county appropriation. It terminated its activities when the appropriation was not made in June, 1945. [End Page 1] The Civic Services Committee, begun in 1949, has continued with a greaty enlarged membership. Its first members were a either architectural historians or individuals professionay concerned with the cultural life of the city. Their objective was and still is to devise ways and means of preserving as much as possible of Charlestons unique architecture, not in any sense as static museum pieces, but as usefu parts of a living community potentialy of enormous value to the city as a whole. The committee eary realized that city planning was the only method of accompishing this, and that a aspects of the life of the community must be considered. The enlarged membership of the committee has therefore been drawn from a interests, social and economic as we as cultural. There are no requirements of membership except civic interest and civic contribution. The committee now numbers 53 and is assisted by a metropolitan Council of 96 members. The Rockefeller Foundation, interested in the sponsorship of the Carolina Art Associaltion, made a three year grant to the work of the Civic Services Committee totaing $24,000 in May of 1942. They were interested primarily in the fact of the Art Associaltion"s desire to demonstrate that it could render a usefu service to the community. The Foundation has atey stated that the Art Association has done more toward determining new fieds of usefuness than any simiar institution in the country. The Chamber of Commerce announced its Post War planning Committee in the fall of 1943. Officias of the Chamber were invited to attend a meeting of the Civic Services Committee in October of that year and the division of responsibiity of the two organizations was freely and fuy discussed. The Post War planning Committee announced its intention of securing $135,000 for a three year budget. $162,000 has been secured, including $35,000 appropriated by the County Deegation. Officias of the Committee and the Chamber of Commerce are of the opinion that this sum must be used in its entirety for industrial development although they have included Civic Affairs in their program. In December, 1943 George W. Simons, Jr was engaged by the Civic Services Committee as planning consutant. His report of that month was printed and distributed to a interested parties including a members of the Post War planning Committee The Civic Services Committee has continued to retain the services of Mr. Simons since December, 1943, and has atey added Henry P. Staats, AIA to its staff It has pubished and distributed, through the generous sponsorship of 182 of Charlestons businessmen, 5,000 copies of its architectural survey, "This Is Charleston." A second edition of 5,000, sponsored by 122 individuals and firms, is now being printed Mr. Simons has been used largey to organize vounteer committees to make a thorough study of traffic conditions in Charleston and to anayze their findings. It was expected that the organization and experience of these committees would be -2- [End Page 2] vauable for ater studies. Over 1,000 individuals have contributed to this study which ed to an invitation to appear before City Council in March, 1945 to present a plan for off- street parking areas for the central business district. At that time City Council passed a resoution commending the plan in principe and asking the Civic Services Committee to continue its studies in connection with the City planning and Zoning Commission. Engineering studies are now being competed in order that the off-street parking plan can be submitted, compete in a detais, to City Council in September. The Civic Services Committee has expended $38,000 and has realized that Additional funds would be necessary to maintain its staff after October 1, 1945, but at no time in the past two years was it prepared to seek funds in confict with, or in competition with, the Post War planning Committee. It was hoped that the atter Committee would, when its funds were secured, utiize the experience of the Civic Services Committee which proposed that it serve as research and planning Consultant for the physical planning of the area if this were undertaken by the Post War planning Committee. The proposa has been rejected but is to be reconsidered. In order that funds expended and experience gained not be ost, the Civic Services Committee has decided to continue to function in the following matters: 1. To compete the studies reative to off-street parking for the central business area. Vounteer research has been competed and staff and Consultant saaries are budgeted to October 1. $5,000 is necessaryi however to compete engiamp;gt; neering studies and property appraisas 2. To retain its organization and identity and serve wherever possible as Consultant or advisor on a physical improvements or egisation reative to them for a organizations or commissions in the area. 3.. To maintain a staff and engage consutants if funds are avaiable, for the following. a. Tim development and continua maintenance of and overa area.plan, if this is not undertaken and continued by any other agency. b. To assist the Board of architectural review in remodeing problems by furnishing architectural consutants. c. To impement wherever possible the work of other organizations interested in preservation of architecturally or historically important buildings or areas beieving that this activity is of great economic value to the area. d. To study and suggest egisation necessary to area planning or preservation. 4. To formuate plans for the creation of a Charleston Foundation to carry out: a. Area planning studies continuousy. b. To receive funds for investment by purchase or mortgage of architecturally or historically important buildings-. -3- [End Page 3] c. .To administer gifts of important buildings in coaboration with other organizations. d. To own or contro by mortgage and to rehabiitate important buildings utiizing them for residential, business or Public purposes. e. To devise plans with city and Federal agencies for ow cost housing projects which would use existing fine buildings. 5. To study the possibiity of and to conduct experiments toward the estabishment of a new institution in Charleston to serve the Southeastern area. The end products of most industry are things of usefuness to individuals and an institution devoted to design experiments, consumer acceptance and development would serve a usefu purpose reated to industry and the promoi tiona idea of the Chamber of Commerce in attracting industry. The institution would serve as follows: a. . Through exhibitions and demonstrations of the industrial products of the area. b. Through exhibitions and demonstrations of the potential use of the raw materias of the area. c. Through the estabishment of a design and development aboratory working with industries of the area. d. Through education to conserve and propery use the raw materias of the area. Budget for a 3 year period 1945 - Engineering studies and property appraisas reative to off-street parking 1945-46 Director [remainder of saary paid by C A. A.] architectural Consultant Engineering amp; planning Consultant Other Consultant fees amp; travel Exhibition designer amp; technician Draftsman Secretary Exhibition suppies amp; incidentas 1946-47 Same 1947-48 Director architectural Consultant Exhibition designer amp; technician Draftsman Secretary Consutant"-, fees, exhibition, .demonstration amp;.incidenta $5,000 $2000 3200 2400 3600 3000 2400 1800 Jamp;QQ. 20,000 20,000 $2000 3200 3000 2400 1800 .26.00 15.000 , $60,000 [End Page 4]
  • Image 01
    planning IN Charleston June 28, 1945 The first concerted endeavor toward scientific planningg in Charleston in modern times was made by the city government in 1931 during the administration of Mayor Thomas P. Stoney. intimately concerned in this endeavor were James O"Hear, Co. Aston Deas and Major Albert Simons. Morris-Knowes, a planning and engineering firm of Phiadephia, made the studies end executed the master plan for the city. The Zoning ordinances - associated in the Public mind only with preservation of two small areas of "od and historic Charleston," but actuay embracing zoning matters throughout the entire city - were adopted by City Council at that time. The City planning and Zoning Commission, the Board of architectural Review and the Board of Adjustment were created to administer the ordinances. unfortunately, for the ordinances attracted wide attention and approva, the only paid city official concerned with it was the City Engineer whose office was already overburdened. No city appropriation has been avaiable for planning since 1931. The next move toward planning was made by a small group of individuals eary in 1940. The group included E. Miby Burton, John Mead Howes, James O"Hear, Homer M. place, Sidney J. Rittenberg, Albert Simons, Miss Alice R. Huger Smith, Samuel G. Stoney and Robert N. S. Whitelaw. This group ater became the Civic Services Committee. It has become apparent to many that the "distinctive and charming amenity" of Charleston was threatened by loss and change brought about through ignorance, indifference, economic necessity, and the mere pressure of living. The committee therefore studied the effects of i-considered restorations and haphazard explansion, upon things that are historically, architecturally or estheticay important and with these problems of traffic, housing, recreation, etc., as they affected the physical appearance and cultural values of the city. The Civic Services Committee was sponsored by the Carolina Art Association in order that it receive financia support from individuals and foundations. It appied for and received two grants from the Carnegie Corporation of New York; one of $600, which was used to obtain a piot study for a city plan from Frederick aw Olmstead, one of the country"s outstanding city planners and andscape architects; and one of $2400. The second grant was used to empoy a secretary, Miss Helen G. McCormack, who, with the committee, made an architectural survey of the city. Next in the planning sequence, the national Resources planning Board, represented in this area by George W. Simons, Jr., interested Senator Cotsworth P. Means and the County Deegation in securing egisative action to estabish a county planning board. This board was created in Juy, 1942 and was given a county appropriation. It terminated its activities when the appropriation was not made in June, 1945. [End Page 1] The Civic Services Committee, begun in 1949, has continued with a greaty enlarged membership. Its first members were a either architectural historians or individuals professionay concerned with the cultural life of the city. Their objective was and still is to devise ways and means of preserving as much as possible of Charlestons unique architecture, not in any sense as static museum pieces, but as usefu parts of a living community potentialy of enormous value to the city as a whole. The committee eary realized that city planning was the only method of accompishing this, and that a aspects of the life of the community must be considered. The enlarged membership of the committee has therefore been drawn from a interests, social and economic as we as cultural. There are no requirements of membership except civic interest and civic contribution. The committee now numbers 53 and is assisted by a metropolitan Council of 96 members. The Rockefeller Foundation, interested in the sponsorship of the Carolina Art Associaltion, made a three year grant to the work of the Civic Services Committee totaing $24,000 in May of 1942. They were interested primarily in the fact of the Art Associaltion"s desire to demonstrate that it could render a usefu service to the community. The Foundation has atey stated that the Art Association has done more toward determining new fieds of usefuness than any simiar institution in the country. The Chamber of Commerce announced its Post War planning Committee in the fall of 1943. Officias of the Chamber were invited to attend a meeting of the Civic Services Committee in October of that year and the division of responsibiity of the two organizations was freely and fuy discussed. The Post War planning Committee announced its intention of securing $135,000 for a three year budget. $162,000 has been secured, including $35,000 appropriated by the County Deegation. Officias of the Committee and the Chamber of Commerce are of the opinion that this sum must be used in its entirety for industrial development although they have included Civic Affairs in their program. In December, 1943 George W. Simons, Jr was engaged by the Civic Services Committee as planning consutant. His report of that month was printed and distributed to a interested parties including a members of the Post War planning Committee The Civic Services Committee has continued to retain the services of Mr. Simons since December, 1943, and has atey added Henry P. Staats, AIA to its staff It has pubished and distributed, through the generous sponsorship of 182 of Charlestons businessmen, 5,000 copies of its architectural survey, "This Is Charleston." A second edition of 5,000, sponsored by 122 individuals and firms, is now being printed Mr. Simons has been used largey to organize vounteer committees to make a thorough study of traffic conditions in Charleston and to anayze their findings. It was expected that the organization and experience of these committees would be -2- [End Page 2] vauable for ater studies. Over 1,000 individuals have contributed to this study which ed to an invitation to appear before City Council in March, 1945 to present a plan for off- street parking areas for the central business district. At that time City Council passed a resoution commending the plan in principe and asking the Civic Services Committee to continue its studies in connection with the City planning and Zoning Commission. Engineering studies are now being competed in order that the off-street parking plan can be submitted, compete in a detais, to City Council in September. The Civic Services Committee has expended $38,000 and has realized that Additional funds would be necessary to maintain its staff after October 1, 1945, but at no time in the past two years was it prepared to seek funds in confict with, or in competition with, the Post War planning Committee. It was hoped that the atter Committee would, when its funds were secured, utiize the experience of the Civic Services Committee which proposed that it serve as research and planning Consultant for the physical planning of the area if this were undertaken by the Post War planning Committee. The proposa has been rejected but is to be reconsidered. In order that funds expended and experience gained not be ost, the Civic Services Committee has decided to continue to function in the following matters: 1. To compete the studies reative to off-street parking for the central business area. Vounteer research has been competed and staff and Consultant saaries are budgeted to October 1. $5,000 is necessaryi however to compete engiamp;gt; neering studies and property appraisas 2. To retain its organization and identity and serve wherever possible as Consultant or advisor on a physical improvements or egisation reative to them for a organizations or commissions in the area. 3.. To maintain a staff and engage consutants if funds are avaiable, for the following. a. Tim development and continua maintenance of and overa area.plan, if this is not undertaken and continued by any other agency. b. To assist the Board of architectural review in remodeing problems by furnishing architectural consutants. c. To impement wherever possible the work of other organizations interested in preservation of architecturally or historically important buildings or areas beieving that this activity is of great economic value to the area. d. To study and suggest egisation necessary to area planning or preservation. 4. To formuate plans for the creation of a Charleston Foundation to carry out: a. Area planning studies continuousy. b. To receive funds for investment by purchase or mortgage of architecturally or historically important buildings-. -3- [End Page 3] c. .To administer gifts of important buildings in coaboration with other organizations. d. To own or contro by mortgage and to rehabiitate important buildings utiizing them for residential, business or Public purposes. e. To devise plans with city and Federal agencies for ow cost housing projects which would use existing fine buildings. 5. To study the possibiity of and to conduct experiments toward the estabishment of a new institution in Charleston to serve the Southeastern area. The end products of most industry are things of usefuness to individuals and an institution devoted to design experiments, consumer acceptance and development would serve a usefu purpose reated to industry and the promoi tiona idea of the Chamber of Commerce in attracting industry. The institution would serve as follows: a. . Through exhibitions and demonstrations of the industrial products of the area. b. Through exhibitions and demonstrations of the potential use of the raw materias of the area. c. Through the estabishment of a design and development aboratory working with industries of the area. d. Through education to conserve and propery use the raw materias of the area. Budget for a 3 year period 1945 - Engineering studies and property appraisas reative to off-street parking 1945-46 Director [remainder of saary paid by C A. A.] architectural Consultant Engineering amp; planning Consultant Other Consultant fees amp; travel Exhibition designer amp; technician Draftsman Secretary Exhibition suppies amp; incidentas 1946-47 Same 1947-48 Director architectural Consultant Exhibition designer amp; technician Draftsman Secretary Consutant"-, fees, exhibition, .demonstration amp;.incidenta $5,000 $2000 3200 2400 3600 3000 2400 1800 Jamp;QQ. 20,000 20,000 $2000 3200 3000 2400 1800 .26.00 15.000 , $60,000 [End Page 4]
Title:
Folder 02: “Planning in Charleston”
Creator:
Civic Services Committee
Date:
1945
Description:
A report entitled "Planning in Charleston" (June 28, 1945).
Collection:
Civic Services Committee Papers
Contributing Institution:
Margaretta Childs Archives at Historic Charleston Foundation
Media Type:
Manuscripts
Personal or Corporate Subject:
Civic Services Committee--Records and correspondence
Topical Subject:
City planning--South Carolina--Charleston
Series:
Folder 02: CSC History, Objectives, Background Materials
Shelving Locator:
HCF 001
S.C. County:
Charleston County (S.C.)
Internet Media Type:
image/jpeg
Digitization Specifications:
300 ppi, 24-bit depth, color, Epson Expression 10000XL, Archival Masters are tiffs.
Copyright Status Statement:
Digital image copyright 2009, Historic Charleston Foundation. All rights reserved. For more information contact Margaretta Childs Archives at HCF, PO Box 1120, Charleston, SC 29402.