Bernard's patent threshing machine

  • Image 01
    Proportion of a Machine for Two Horses. A. The Drum, which is fixed, containing the revolving Beaters, D. It is three feet two inches long in the clear, and five feet seven inches diameter, in the clear. The opening to let out the grain and straw should be at the bottom, nine inches wide, and the length of the Drum, which must be close every where else except where fed. A board may be put obliquely into the opening of the Drum, to conduct the grain, [and]c. free of the frame: this board should leave only a space sufficient for the beaters to pass....that is, about three fourths of an inch. B. Wheel of the upper fluted feeding roller....Wheel three feet diameter....Roller five inches diameter, and four feet long. C. Wheel of the lower fluted feeding roller, which, as well as the roller, is of the same size as B....Each fluted roller to contain fourteen half inch flutes, lengthwise, and formed so as to make them work like cogs when they come into contact. D. Beaters three feet long, and four feet diameter....that is, from the outside of one beater to the outside of the opposite beater, so as to leave about three and a half inches clear of the drum, for the grain and straw to pass....These beaters should be inch square bars, for arms, and one and a half or two inches broad for the beating part....The beater shaft should be six or seven inches diameter, into which a circular groove must be made an inch deep, to admit a band on each side to turn the feeding rollers: one band or leather strap must be crossed, the other only put round, by which the rollers of the gin or feeder will turn different ways, and carry in the grain....The whorl I, that receives the band of the wheel H, to be fourteen inches diameter. E. Feeding board or plat, two and a half feet broad by three feet long. F. Arms to which the horses are fixed, by which they will describe a circle of twenty one feet diameter. G. Cog wheel thirteen feet diameter, to contain one hundred and thirty eight cogs, and to operate on a wallower of twenty one and a half inches diameter, containing nineteen staves or rounds; which wallower drives H. The Band wheel thirteen feet diameter....this may be a Cog wheel, working into another on the axes of the beaters, instead of a band, and in the same proportion. K. The moveable frame, to be nine feet long, three and a half feet in the clear, and seven feet in height....The inner uprights of the frame, form the receptacle for the drum and rollers, which is adjusted to their respective lengths. If large quantities are required to be threshed, the length of the drum, the beaters, and feeding space must be increased....The movable frame by being advanced toward, or pushed from the band wheel will tighten or ease the rope or band as required, by being fixed on sliders on the barn floor. Bill of Scantling for a Threshing Machine. 3 planks, 14 feet long, 18 by 3 [and] 1 4 inches, clear of cracks....pine. 12 do. Do. 16 by 2 do. do. 3 arms 13 feet long, 8 by 2 do. do. 6 do. 12 [and]1 2 feet long, 8 by 3 [and]1 4 do. do. 10 scantlings 16 feet long, 6 by 4....pine. 150 feet of inch plank, do. 70 feet of 1 [and] 1 4 plank do. 140 cogs, 10 inches long, 3 by 2 [and]1 2....hickory. 36 feet of seasoned stuff for wallowers, 1 [and]1 2 inches thick....oak. 1 shaft, 10 feet long, 18 diameter....left round. 1 do. 16 do. 13 inches diameter....pine. 8 scantlings, 7 feet long, 3 by 3 inches....pine,) Braces for the large wheel. 1 beater shaft, 7 feet long, 7 inches square....pine or oak. 2 gin rollers, 6 [and]1 2 feet, 5 inches square....pine. 9 fathom of inch rope, for band. 1 beam 28 feet long, 16 by 12 inches, square. 2 posts 12 feet long, 10 by 8, if squared. 1 sweep, 24 feet long, 6 by 5 inches for the horses to be put to. 1 post 10 feet long, 8 by 10, squared. 1 sweep, 24 feet long, 6 by 5 inches for the horses to be put to. 1 post 10 feet long, 8 by 10, squared. 2 scantlings, 10 feet long, 6 by 4, for the machine to stand on. INFORMATION TO FARMERS WASHINGTON CITY, JANUARY 21, 1808. I hereby certify, that I have made a Machine for getting out wheat, and any other small grain, for William Carroll, esquire, of Montgomery County, Maryland, on the plan of Mr. Benjamin B. Bernard's patented machine, and under his direction; and from the simplicity of the Machine, the quantity it will thresh, and the ease with which it operates, requiring only one pair of horses, I consider it as the best machine I have ever made or seen; though I have built many on Booker's plan, and have seen many on Deneale's and others....I also certify, that I have lately received a letter from my son at Wilmington, (N. C.) who informs me he built one of the same kind for getting out rice, and it exceeds all that have ever been tried....This Machine, worked by oxen, got out between three and four hundred bushels a day. Test. JOHN TAYLOE. ARRON DYER. We whose names are hereunto subscribed, do hereby certify, that we are in possession of Threshing Machines, invented and constructed by Benjamin B. Bernard; that we give them a decided preference to all others, and that they will with ease get out two hundred bushels of wheat per day, with the draft of two or three horses. W. Bolling, George S. Smith, Wm. Goode, Benjamin Palmore, John P. Ellet, John Herndon, James M. Moore, M. M. James Herndon, Wm. S. Fowler, Carter H. Bradley, Wm. James, John Austin, William Bradley. N. B....There is a model of the above at the Patent Office, City of Washington, where enquiries may be made. [End Page 1] Bernard's patent Threshing Machine The following explanatory references were by mistake omitted on the other side. L. A block of wood which rests on the regulators, one foot square, and six feet long. This block must bear equally on each regulator, and consequently on each gudgeon of the upper fluted roller. M. The regulator to the left of the feeding space. The other regulator rests on the axis to the right of the feeding space, but being between the wheel, (to which the upper roller is fixed) and the upright piece in which the gudgeon runs it is not visible in this view of the machine. These regulators are about three feet long, and three inches by one inch, cut hollow at the end, so as to rest on the gudgeons and keep the roller sufficiently down, while the wheat or other grain enters. In feeding, the band of the sheaf may be cut, and the whole sheaf spread at once so quickly that between thirty and forty must be put in during a minute; but if the sheaf be short, forty or fifty in the minute. If it be wished that the straw be conveyed immediately out of the barn from the machine, the opening of the drum A, may be made opposite the fluted rollers instead of being at the bottom, and the straw will then be thrown on a network of wire or open skreen, which will permit all the grain to pass through during the exit of the straw. The great wheel G, by ungeering this machine, may be applied to turn a pair of stones for grinding corn, wheat, [and]c. Plaister of Paris, breaking Flax and Hemp, [and]c. N. B. Since the foregoing was printed, the Hon. Mr. Edward Lloyd, (member of Congress) Maryland, has had a Machine erected, which, (by a letter to Dr. Thornton, Patent Office, City of Washington) gives such perfect satisfaction, on extensive trials in threshing Wheat and Oats, that he means to erect a machine on each of his farms, to the amount of about ten. Col. Tayloe, of Mount Airy, Virginia, is now erecting one of the same Machines, and will require about the same number. Millwrights are in great demand. B. B. B. [End Page 2]
  • Image 01
    Proportion of a Machine for Two Horses. A. The Drum, which is fixed, containing the revolving Beaters, D. It is three feet two inches long in the clear, and five feet seven inches diameter, in the clear. The opening to let out the grain and straw should be at the bottom, nine inches wide, and the length of the Drum, which must be close every where else except where fed. A board may be put obliquely into the opening of the Drum, to conduct the grain, [and]c. free of the frame: this board should leave only a space sufficient for the beaters to pass....that is, about three fourths of an inch. B. Wheel of the upper fluted feeding roller....Wheel three feet diameter....Roller five inches diameter, and four feet long. C. Wheel of the lower fluted feeding roller, which, as well as the roller, is of the same size as B....Each fluted roller to contain fourteen half inch flutes, lengthwise, and formed so as to make them work like cogs when they come into contact. D. Beaters three feet long, and four feet diameter....that is, from the outside of one beater to the outside of the opposite beater, so as to leave about three and a half inches clear of the drum, for the grain and straw to pass....These beaters should be inch square bars, for arms, and one and a half or two inches broad for the beating part....The beater shaft should be six or seven inches diameter, into which a circular groove must be made an inch deep, to admit a band on each side to turn the feeding rollers: one band or leather strap must be crossed, the other only put round, by which the rollers of the gin or feeder will turn different ways, and carry in the grain....The whorl I, that receives the band of the wheel H, to be fourteen inches diameter. E. Feeding board or plat, two and a half feet broad by three feet long. F. Arms to which the horses are fixed, by which they will describe a circle of twenty one feet diameter. G. Cog wheel thirteen feet diameter, to contain one hundred and thirty eight cogs, and to operate on a wallower of twenty one and a half inches diameter, containing nineteen staves or rounds; which wallower drives H. The Band wheel thirteen feet diameter....this may be a Cog wheel, working into another on the axes of the beaters, instead of a band, and in the same proportion. K. The moveable frame, to be nine feet long, three and a half feet in the clear, and seven feet in height....The inner uprights of the frame, form the receptacle for the drum and rollers, which is adjusted to their respective lengths. If large quantities are required to be threshed, the length of the drum, the beaters, and feeding space must be increased....The movable frame by being advanced toward, or pushed from the band wheel will tighten or ease the rope or band as required, by being fixed on sliders on the barn floor. Bill of Scantling for a Threshing Machine. 3 planks, 14 feet long, 18 by 3 [and] 1 4 inches, clear of cracks....pine. 12 do. Do. 16 by 2 do. do. 3 arms 13 feet long, 8 by 2 do. do. 6 do. 12 [and]1 2 feet long, 8 by 3 [and]1 4 do. do. 10 scantlings 16 feet long, 6 by 4....pine. 150 feet of inch plank, do. 70 feet of 1 [and] 1 4 plank do. 140 cogs, 10 inches long, 3 by 2 [and]1 2....hickory. 36 feet of seasoned stuff for wallowers, 1 [and]1 2 inches thick....oak. 1 shaft, 10 feet long, 18 diameter....left round. 1 do. 16 do. 13 inches diameter....pine. 8 scantlings, 7 feet long, 3 by 3 inches....pine,) Braces for the large wheel. 1 beater shaft, 7 feet long, 7 inches square....pine or oak. 2 gin rollers, 6 [and]1 2 feet, 5 inches square....pine. 9 fathom of inch rope, for band. 1 beam 28 feet long, 16 by 12 inches, square. 2 posts 12 feet long, 10 by 8, if squared. 1 sweep, 24 feet long, 6 by 5 inches for the horses to be put to. 1 post 10 feet long, 8 by 10, squared. 1 sweep, 24 feet long, 6 by 5 inches for the horses to be put to. 1 post 10 feet long, 8 by 10, squared. 2 scantlings, 10 feet long, 6 by 4, for the machine to stand on. INFORMATION TO FARMERS WASHINGTON CITY, JANUARY 21, 1808. I hereby certify, that I have made a Machine for getting out wheat, and any other small grain, for William Carroll, esquire, of Montgomery County, Maryland, on the plan of Mr. Benjamin B. Bernard's patented machine, and under his direction; and from the simplicity of the Machine, the quantity it will thresh, and the ease with which it operates, requiring only one pair of horses, I consider it as the best machine I have ever made or seen; though I have built many on Booker's plan, and have seen many on Deneale's and others....I also certify, that I have lately received a letter from my son at Wilmington, (N. C.) who informs me he built one of the same kind for getting out rice, and it exceeds all that have ever been tried....This Machine, worked by oxen, got out between three and four hundred bushels a day. Test. JOHN TAYLOE. ARRON DYER. We whose names are hereunto subscribed, do hereby certify, that we are in possession of Threshing Machines, invented and constructed by Benjamin B. Bernard; that we give them a decided preference to all others, and that they will with ease get out two hundred bushels of wheat per day, with the draft of two or three horses. W. Bolling, George S. Smith, Wm. Goode, Benjamin Palmore, John P. Ellet, John Herndon, James M. Moore, M. M. James Herndon, Wm. S. Fowler, Carter H. Bradley, Wm. James, John Austin, William Bradley. N. B....There is a model of the above at the Patent Office, City of Washington, where enquiries may be made. [End Page 1] Bernard's patent Threshing Machine The following explanatory references were by mistake omitted on the other side. L. A block of wood which rests on the regulators, one foot square, and six feet long. This block must bear equally on each regulator, and consequently on each gudgeon of the upper fluted roller. M. The regulator to the left of the feeding space. The other regulator rests on the axis to the right of the feeding space, but being between the wheel, (to which the upper roller is fixed) and the upright piece in which the gudgeon runs it is not visible in this view of the machine. These regulators are about three feet long, and three inches by one inch, cut hollow at the end, so as to rest on the gudgeons and keep the roller sufficiently down, while the wheat or other grain enters. In feeding, the band of the sheaf may be cut, and the whole sheaf spread at once so quickly that between thirty and forty must be put in during a minute; but if the sheaf be short, forty or fifty in the minute. If it be wished that the straw be conveyed immediately out of the barn from the machine, the opening of the drum A, may be made opposite the fluted rollers instead of being at the bottom, and the straw will then be thrown on a network of wire or open skreen, which will permit all the grain to pass through during the exit of the straw. The great wheel G, by ungeering this machine, may be applied to turn a pair of stones for grinding corn, wheat, [and]c. Plaister of Paris, breaking Flax and Hemp, [and]c. N. B. Since the foregoing was printed, the Hon. Mr. Edward Lloyd, (member of Congress) Maryland, has had a Machine erected, which, (by a letter to Dr. Thornton, Patent Office, City of Washington) gives such perfect satisfaction, on extensive trials in threshing Wheat and Oats, that he means to erect a machine on each of his farms, to the amount of about ten. Col. Tayloe, of Mount Airy, Virginia, is now erecting one of the same Machines, and will require about the same number. Millwrights are in great demand. B. B. B. [End Page 2]
Title:
Bernard's patent threshing machine
Date:
1808, 1808
Collection:
Thomas Pinckney papers, ca. 1790-ca. 1825.
Contributing Institution:
South Carolina Historical Society
Media Type:
Manuscripts
Personal or Corporate Subject:
Pinckney, Thomas, 1750-1828
Topical Subject:
Drafting and industrial drawings, Mechanical drawing, Agricultural instruments, Agricultural machinery--Design and construction
Geographic Subject:
Berkeley County (S.C.)
Language:
English
Series:
South Carolinians at Work
S.C. County:
Charleston County (S.C.)
Internet Media Type:
image/jpeg
Copyright Status Statement:
Digital image copyright 2011, The South Carolina Historical Society. All rights reserved. For more information contact The South Carolina Historical Society, 100 Meeting St., Charleston, SC 29401.