366. Madame Antonia to Bp Patrick Lynch -- April 20, 1865

  • Image 01
    J.M.J April 20, 1865 My very dear Brother, You will find me troublesome but as I have learned something from the community in Columbia I felt that it would be cruel not tell you especially as they have no way of communicating with you. This child I saw was one of the boarders. She rode thirteen miles on horseback & then walked twenty five before she reached the cars which took her to Charlotte, N.C. She then came on to Richmond--was there are the time of the evacuation of that city, and is now in Baltimore with her mother. They have been living in Columbia many years. She told me when that city was bombarded in the evening. Sister E. with two companions and all the children each carrying a blanket & pillow walked out to your house in the country. Then they returned in hopes nothing would befall them. Genl Sherman was sent for. He sent six men to protect them but they were their worst enemies for one of them carrying a burning torch up to the[End Page 1] third story--soon had the house in flames. They saved three Harps two Pianos one piece of Habit stuff & flannel [?] loosing all their books. They at present occupy two houses, the Preston House, and the Methodist College. They are using every exertion to lessen their number of scholars. In the Preston House they have a regular chapel & chaplain every other morning they have mass in the College. They were in hopes when their number would be smaller to only occupy the first named house but now that they have left Richmond (I mean the Preston family.) I do not know what they may do. The Preston family wrote to them expressing their satisfaction that they were in possession of their house. Other things I might tell you but I think as you cannot change them its better not to be imprudent. It is a great blessing that they passed thro' so much trouble and anxiety with presence of mind. They have still to live on "rations" sent them by friends in Augusta and other parts of the country, but as the roads are all out of order, and so difficult to transport supplies they are obliged to use very great economy to live at all. This child[End Page 2] said also that. It was Sister E. intention or expectation to open a dayschool in September. So my dear Brother we see how God protects us all in most trying circumstances. Your own position is very trying, but I hope you will have courage to meet with all that may cross your path. Your absence is most painful but we do not see how you could return. For some time we all thought you were spending the months until Spring with Sister Mary & family, but a few days since I positively heard that were still in Rome but much embarrassed about your return. Our country is at present in a very great excitement from the murder of the President and other persons in authority which took place on the night of the fourteenth. What the consequences may be no one can imagine but I suppose you will learn more than I can tell, but generally it is thought much will come from it. I have written that part about the community losing all their cloathing [sic], because as I learned they imported their worsted goods & I thought perhaps you might make some agreement, so that when the ports were opened they might again obtain some more. My dear[End Page 3] Brother I have not been able to write or to hear from Cheraw since the letter Anna wrote me early in March, our only consolation under all these [illegible] circumstances is to foray for one another. We all thank you so much for your prayers for us during your pilgrimages to holy places. I am so happy that you have been spending this Season in Rome. You may never again visit Europe. I am sure not for so long a stay. Our community are so interested in you I am sure have a large share in their prayers. We all feel so much indebted to you for your kind attentions to us. I have been so forward in proposing questions for you to have settled &c but somehow I think you will pass thro' Baltimore on your return home. A week since when the Provincial of the Redemptionists left this city I gave him a letter for you. This one Rev F. Helmpracke [?] (who is thought will be the next Provincial) takes charge of. I will hope they may find you in good health. We all send you our greeting this holy season. Praying that our Lord may so arrange things that you may soon return home but hope that you will wait until all dangers are over. Begging your Blessing and holy prayers for us all. Ever your devoted sister. Antonia of the Purification. Prioress[End Page 4]
  • Image 01
    J.M.J April 20, 1865 My very dear Brother, You will find me troublesome but as I have learned something from the community in Columbia I felt that it would be cruel not tell you especially as they have no way of communicating with you. This child I saw was one of the boarders. She rode thirteen miles on horseback & then walked twenty five before she reached the cars which took her to Charlotte, N.C. She then came on to Richmond--was there are the time of the evacuation of that city, and is now in Baltimore with her mother. They have been living in Columbia many years. She told me when that city was bombarded in the evening. Sister E. with two companions and all the children each carrying a blanket & pillow walked out to your house in the country. Then they returned in hopes nothing would befall them. Genl Sherman was sent for. He sent six men to protect them but they were their worst enemies for one of them carrying a burning torch up to the[End Page 1] third story--soon had the house in flames. They saved three Harps two Pianos one piece of Habit stuff & flannel [?] loosing all their books. They at present occupy two houses, the Preston House, and the Methodist College. They are using every exertion to lessen their number of scholars. In the Preston House they have a regular chapel & chaplain every other morning they have mass in the College. They were in hopes when their number would be smaller to only occupy the first named house but now that they have left Richmond (I mean the Preston family.) I do not know what they may do. The Preston family wrote to them expressing their satisfaction that they were in possession of their house. Other things I might tell you but I think as you cannot change them its better not to be imprudent. It is a great blessing that they passed thro' so much trouble and anxiety with presence of mind. They have still to live on "rations" sent them by friends in Augusta and other parts of the country, but as the roads are all out of order, and so difficult to transport supplies they are obliged to use very great economy to live at all. This child[End Page 2] said also that. It was Sister E. intention or expectation to open a dayschool in September. So my dear Brother we see how God protects us all in most trying circumstances. Your own position is very trying, but I hope you will have courage to meet with all that may cross your path. Your absence is most painful but we do not see how you could return. For some time we all thought you were spending the months until Spring with Sister Mary & family, but a few days since I positively heard that were still in Rome but much embarrassed about your return. Our country is at present in a very great excitement from the murder of the President and other persons in authority which took place on the night of the fourteenth. What the consequences may be no one can imagine but I suppose you will learn more than I can tell, but generally it is thought much will come from it. I have written that part about the community losing all their cloathing [sic], because as I learned they imported their worsted goods & I thought perhaps you might make some agreement, so that when the ports were opened they might again obtain some more. My dear[End Page 3] Brother I have not been able to write or to hear from Cheraw since the letter Anna wrote me early in March, our only consolation under all these [illegible] circumstances is to foray for one another. We all thank you so much for your prayers for us during your pilgrimages to holy places. I am so happy that you have been spending this Season in Rome. You may never again visit Europe. I am sure not for so long a stay. Our community are so interested in you I am sure have a large share in their prayers. We all feel so much indebted to you for your kind attentions to us. I have been so forward in proposing questions for you to have settled &c but somehow I think you will pass thro' Baltimore on your return home. A week since when the Provincial of the Redemptionists left this city I gave him a letter for you. This one Rev F. Helmpracke [?] (who is thought will be the next Provincial) takes charge of. I will hope they may find you in good health. We all send you our greeting this holy season. Praying that our Lord may so arrange things that you may soon return home but hope that you will wait until all dangers are over. Begging your Blessing and holy prayers for us all. Ever your devoted sister. Antonia of the Purification. Prioress[End Page 4]
  • Image 01
    J.M.J April 20, 1865 My very dear Brother, You will find me troublesome but as I have learned something from the community in Columbia I felt that it would be cruel not tell you especially as they have no way of communicating with you. This child I saw was one of the boarders. She rode thirteen miles on horseback & then walked twenty five before she reached the cars which took her to Charlotte, N.C. She then came on to Richmond--was there are the time of the evacuation of that city, and is now in Baltimore with her mother. They have been living in Columbia many years. She told me when that city was bombarded in the evening. Sister E. with two companions and all the children each carrying a blanket & pillow walked out to your house in the country. Then they returned in hopes nothing would befall them. Genl Sherman was sent for. He sent six men to protect them but they were their worst enemies for one of them carrying a burning torch up to the[End Page 1] third story--soon had the house in flames. They saved three Harps two Pianos one piece of Habit stuff & flannel [?] loosing all their books. They at present occupy two houses, the Preston House, and the Methodist College. They are using every exertion to lessen their number of scholars. In the Preston House they have a regular chapel & chaplain every other morning they have mass in the College. They were in hopes when their number would be smaller to only occupy the first named house but now that they have left Richmond (I mean the Preston family.) I do not know what they may do. The Preston family wrote to them expressing their satisfaction that they were in possession of their house. Other things I might tell you but I think as you cannot change them its better not to be imprudent. It is a great blessing that they passed thro' so much trouble and anxiety with presence of mind. They have still to live on "rations" sent them by friends in Augusta and other parts of the country, but as the roads are all out of order, and so difficult to transport supplies they are obliged to use very great economy to live at all. This child[End Page 2] said also that. It was Sister E. intention or expectation to open a dayschool in September. So my dear Brother we see how God protects us all in most trying circumstances. Your own position is very trying, but I hope you will have courage to meet with all that may cross your path. Your absence is most painful but we do not see how you could return. For some time we all thought you were spending the months until Spring with Sister Mary & family, but a few days since I positively heard that were still in Rome but much embarrassed about your return. Our country is at present in a very great excitement from the murder of the President and other persons in authority which took place on the night of the fourteenth. What the consequences may be no one can imagine but I suppose you will learn more than I can tell, but generally it is thought much will come from it. I have written that part about the community losing all their cloathing [sic], because as I learned they imported their worsted goods & I thought perhaps you might make some agreement, so that when the ports were opened they might again obtain some more. My dear[End Page 3] Brother I have not been able to write or to hear from Cheraw since the letter Anna wrote me early in March, our only consolation under all these [illegible] circumstances is to foray for one another. We all thank you so much for your prayers for us during your pilgrimages to holy places. I am so happy that you have been spending this Season in Rome. You may never again visit Europe. I am sure not for so long a stay. Our community are so interested in you I am sure have a large share in their prayers. We all feel so much indebted to you for your kind attentions to us. I have been so forward in proposing questions for you to have settled &c but somehow I think you will pass thro' Baltimore on your return home. A week since when the Provincial of the Redemptionists left this city I gave him a letter for you. This one Rev F. Helmpracke [?] (who is thought will be the next Provincial) takes charge of. I will hope they may find you in good health. We all send you our greeting this holy season. Praying that our Lord may so arrange things that you may soon return home but hope that you will wait until all dangers are over. Begging your Blessing and holy prayers for us all. Ever your devoted sister. Antonia of the Purification. Prioress[End Page 4]
  • Image 01
    J.M.J April 20, 1865 My very dear Brother, You will find me troublesome but as I have learned something from the community in Columbia I felt that it would be cruel not tell you especially as they have no way of communicating with you. This child I saw was one of the boarders. She rode thirteen miles on horseback & then walked twenty five before she reached the cars which took her to Charlotte, N.C. She then came on to Richmond--was there are the time of the evacuation of that city, and is now in Baltimore with her mother. They have been living in Columbia many years. She told me when that city was bombarded in the evening. Sister E. with two companions and all the children each carrying a blanket & pillow walked out to your house in the country. Then they returned in hopes nothing would befall them. Genl Sherman was sent for. He sent six men to protect them but they were their worst enemies for one of them carrying a burning torch up to the[End Page 1] third story--soon had the house in flames. They saved three Harps two Pianos one piece of Habit stuff & flannel [?] loosing all their books. They at present occupy two houses, the Preston House, and the Methodist College. They are using every exertion to lessen their number of scholars. In the Preston House they have a regular chapel & chaplain every other morning they have mass in the College. They were in hopes when their number would be smaller to only occupy the first named house but now that they have left Richmond (I mean the Preston family.) I do not know what they may do. The Preston family wrote to them expressing their satisfaction that they were in possession of their house. Other things I might tell you but I think as you cannot change them its better not to be imprudent. It is a great blessing that they passed thro' so much trouble and anxiety with presence of mind. They have still to live on "rations" sent them by friends in Augusta and other parts of the country, but as the roads are all out of order, and so difficult to transport supplies they are obliged to use very great economy to live at all. This child[End Page 2] said also that. It was Sister E. intention or expectation to open a dayschool in September. So my dear Brother we see how God protects us all in most trying circumstances. Your own position is very trying, but I hope you will have courage to meet with all that may cross your path. Your absence is most painful but we do not see how you could return. For some time we all thought you were spending the months until Spring with Sister Mary & family, but a few days since I positively heard that were still in Rome but much embarrassed about your return. Our country is at present in a very great excitement from the murder of the President and other persons in authority which took place on the night of the fourteenth. What the consequences may be no one can imagine but I suppose you will learn more than I can tell, but generally it is thought much will come from it. I have written that part about the community losing all their cloathing [sic], because as I learned they imported their worsted goods & I thought perhaps you might make some agreement, so that when the ports were opened they might again obtain some more. My dear[End Page 3] Brother I have not been able to write or to hear from Cheraw since the letter Anna wrote me early in March, our only consolation under all these [illegible] circumstances is to foray for one another. We all thank you so much for your prayers for us during your pilgrimages to holy places. I am so happy that you have been spending this Season in Rome. You may never again visit Europe. I am sure not for so long a stay. Our community are so interested in you I am sure have a large share in their prayers. We all feel so much indebted to you for your kind attentions to us. I have been so forward in proposing questions for you to have settled &c but somehow I think you will pass thro' Baltimore on your return home. A week since when the Provincial of the Redemptionists left this city I gave him a letter for you. This one Rev F. Helmpracke [?] (who is thought will be the next Provincial) takes charge of. I will hope they may find you in good health. We all send you our greeting this holy season. Praying that our Lord may so arrange things that you may soon return home but hope that you will wait until all dangers are over. Begging your Blessing and holy prayers for us all. Ever your devoted sister. Antonia of the Purification. Prioress[End Page 4]
Title:
366. Madame Antonia to Bp Patrick Lynch -- April 20, 1865
Creator:
Lynch, Madame Antonia
Date:
1865-04-20
Description:
Letter from Madame Antonia in Baltimore to Bishop Patrick Lynch in Rome describing the events surrounding the destruction of the Ursuline Convent in Columbia by Sherman's troops. She also mentions the recent assassination of President Lincoln and writes "what the consequences may be no one can imagine." April 20, 1865. 4p.
Collection:
Lynch Family Letters, 1858-1866
Contributing Institution:
Catholic Diocese of Charleston Archives
Media Type:
Manuscripts
Personal or Corporate Subject:
Lynch family, Hampton-Preston House (Columbia, S.C.), Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865--Assassination, Sherman, William T. (William Tecumseh), 1820-1891, Catholic church--Maryland--Baltimore
Topical Subject:
Carmelite nuns--Maryland--Baltimore, Convents--Maryland--Baltimore, Sherman's March through the Carolinas, Ursulines--South Carolina--Columbia, Convents--South Carolina--Columbia, Boarding schools--South Carolina--Columbia
Geographic Subject:
Columbia (S.C.)--History--Burning, 1865
Shelving Locator:
Box_15_H12_Page_01.jpg
S.C. County:
Charleston County (S.C.)
Internet Media Type:
image/jpeg
Copyright Status Statement:
Digital image copyright 2010, The Catholic Diocese of Charleston Archives. All rights reserved. For more information contact The Catholic Diocese of Charleston Archives, Charleston, SC 29424.