033. Madame Baptiste to Bp Patrick Lynch -- February 24, 1859

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    JMJ Ursuline Convent Feb 24th/59 My Dearest Brother I suppose if I were to wait until tomorrow or the next day I might say something of Miss Ryan's arrival, but I feel as if I would like a little "chat" with you, so I will obey the impulse and talk on-I was called to the parlor a few evenings since to accept a very pretty present of the "Lives of the Saints" from a little French woman of church who said she bought them in Paris last summer, and begged my acceptance of them in pretty good English-I soon perceived that the books were a mere pretext, and learned that "Marie Charlotte Fearenbach" wished to be a Religious, and was willing, to do all she might be told, she only feared she could not be received because she was not good enough, or might be sent away. Along the side: appetites? When will you start for the Bahamas? I would think is more pleasant in the cool, than warm weather-Please write soon and pray for us all, especially for your own sister Ellen Sis M Baptiste Superior [End Page 1] She is twenty-eight years of age, I think she said, healthy and has learned embroidery as a trade together with millinery-and for the last three years has been a sort of ladies-maid, and work woman in respectable families, to avoid boarding among all sorts of people, since her sisters death. I like her merry countenance, and her capacity for embroidery, and with your permission will give her a trial. I gave her no decided answer, but told her to pray and consult Father Joseph who is her Confessor. He says she is as good a Catholic as is in Columbia-Today I read a short letter from L Condy who defers to some indefinite period, the realization of her designs, and cannot even visit Columbia. It is all for the best, and I think it well not to urge the matter at all farther-. Sister Ursula objected very much to our letting her stay in the convent, so I am glad she is not coming-We are all very well thank God. I felt a little alarmed about Ellen Spann yesterday, and sent for John in a great hurry, fearing she had the scarlet fever which is so prevalent. [End Page 2] happily my fears were groundless, and she is better today. I saw a letter from Bernard to John, well written and in good spirits-I am sorry to hear that Father is so unwell, suffering from risings on his neck, which John thinks more seriously of than he expresses to the family at home. John and family are quite well excepting the children have feverish colds and Eliza is worn down with the baby. John is fatigued for want of rest, he is up at night with Mr Marshall (?) too. Nothing has been done to the house yet except that John saw a carpenter who examined it, and said the thoughts all that was necessary was to change the gutter, Mr McReilly's son died on Thursday, therefore John did not wish to mention it to him-. My dearest Brother would you not think it well to speak to Henrietta, for her neglect of duty as a wife and housekeeper. It is really a shame for her to act as she does. I don't know what kind of a conscience she [End Page 3] has to approach the sacraments and neglect her duties as she does-A lady from Cheraw told me this evening that she never was at home-Some one else asked if Francis and his wife were separated-And she does not hesitate to say that her mother and sister wish her to remain in Charleston, and she never would return to Cheraw, if she was not obliged to do so-I feel very much tempted to write her a lecture-the illegible of her! If I were in Francis place, I would not pay a cent for her while in Charleston, but while in Cheraw she should have every comfort, and she should be at her post of duty-she never will like it, as long as she remains absent from it-. I suppose you think my dearest Brother it is time to stop after this tirade-Well, the final with me is "Deo Gratias I am a Religious" and we feel this especially after being in the parlor, and hearing the details of every day life-I do not think my dearest Brother that our Sisters are able to fast during Lent, and labor too-will you give me the power to direct them according to their [End Page 4]
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    JMJ Ursuline Convent Feb 24th/59 My Dearest Brother I suppose if I were to wait until tomorrow or the next day I might say something of Miss Ryan's arrival, but I feel as if I would like a little "chat" with you, so I will obey the impulse and talk on-I was called to the parlor a few evenings since to accept a very pretty present of the "Lives of the Saints" from a little French woman of church who said she bought them in Paris last summer, and begged my acceptance of them in pretty good English-I soon perceived that the books were a mere pretext, and learned that "Marie Charlotte Fearenbach" wished to be a Religious, and was willing, to do all she might be told, she only feared she could not be received because she was not good enough, or might be sent away. Along the side: appetites? When will you start for the Bahamas? I would think is more pleasant in the cool, than warm weather-Please write soon and pray for us all, especially for your own sister Ellen Sis M Baptiste Superior [End Page 1] She is twenty-eight years of age, I think she said, healthy and has learned embroidery as a trade together with millinery-and for the last three years has been a sort of ladies-maid, and work woman in respectable families, to avoid boarding among all sorts of people, since her sisters death. I like her merry countenance, and her capacity for embroidery, and with your permission will give her a trial. I gave her no decided answer, but told her to pray and consult Father Joseph who is her Confessor. He says she is as good a Catholic as is in Columbia-Today I read a short letter from L Condy who defers to some indefinite period, the realization of her designs, and cannot even visit Columbia. It is all for the best, and I think it well not to urge the matter at all farther-. Sister Ursula objected very much to our letting her stay in the convent, so I am glad she is not coming-We are all very well thank God. I felt a little alarmed about Ellen Spann yesterday, and sent for John in a great hurry, fearing she had the scarlet fever which is so prevalent. [End Page 2] happily my fears were groundless, and she is better today. I saw a letter from Bernard to John, well written and in good spirits-I am sorry to hear that Father is so unwell, suffering from risings on his neck, which John thinks more seriously of than he expresses to the family at home. John and family are quite well excepting the children have feverish colds and Eliza is worn down with the baby. John is fatigued for want of rest, he is up at night with Mr Marshall (?) too. Nothing has been done to the house yet except that John saw a carpenter who examined it, and said the thoughts all that was necessary was to change the gutter, Mr McReilly's son died on Thursday, therefore John did not wish to mention it to him-. My dearest Brother would you not think it well to speak to Henrietta, for her neglect of duty as a wife and housekeeper. It is really a shame for her to act as she does. I don't know what kind of a conscience she [End Page 3] has to approach the sacraments and neglect her duties as she does-A lady from Cheraw told me this evening that she never was at home-Some one else asked if Francis and his wife were separated-And she does not hesitate to say that her mother and sister wish her to remain in Charleston, and she never would return to Cheraw, if she was not obliged to do so-I feel very much tempted to write her a lecture-the illegible of her! If I were in Francis place, I would not pay a cent for her while in Charleston, but while in Cheraw she should have every comfort, and she should be at her post of duty-she never will like it, as long as she remains absent from it-. I suppose you think my dearest Brother it is time to stop after this tirade-Well, the final with me is "Deo Gratias I am a Religious" and we feel this especially after being in the parlor, and hearing the details of every day life-I do not think my dearest Brother that our Sisters are able to fast during Lent, and labor too-will you give me the power to direct them according to their [End Page 4]
  • Image 01
    JMJ Ursuline Convent Feb 24th/59 My Dearest Brother I suppose if I were to wait until tomorrow or the next day I might say something of Miss Ryan's arrival, but I feel as if I would like a little "chat" with you, so I will obey the impulse and talk on-I was called to the parlor a few evenings since to accept a very pretty present of the "Lives of the Saints" from a little French woman of church who said she bought them in Paris last summer, and begged my acceptance of them in pretty good English-I soon perceived that the books were a mere pretext, and learned that "Marie Charlotte Fearenbach" wished to be a Religious, and was willing, to do all she might be told, she only feared she could not be received because she was not good enough, or might be sent away. Along the side: appetites? When will you start for the Bahamas? I would think is more pleasant in the cool, than warm weather-Please write soon and pray for us all, especially for your own sister Ellen Sis M Baptiste Superior [End Page 1] She is twenty-eight years of age, I think she said, healthy and has learned embroidery as a trade together with millinery-and for the last three years has been a sort of ladies-maid, and work woman in respectable families, to avoid boarding among all sorts of people, since her sisters death. I like her merry countenance, and her capacity for embroidery, and with your permission will give her a trial. I gave her no decided answer, but told her to pray and consult Father Joseph who is her Confessor. He says she is as good a Catholic as is in Columbia-Today I read a short letter from L Condy who defers to some indefinite period, the realization of her designs, and cannot even visit Columbia. It is all for the best, and I think it well not to urge the matter at all farther-. Sister Ursula objected very much to our letting her stay in the convent, so I am glad she is not coming-We are all very well thank God. I felt a little alarmed about Ellen Spann yesterday, and sent for John in a great hurry, fearing she had the scarlet fever which is so prevalent. [End Page 2] happily my fears were groundless, and she is better today. I saw a letter from Bernard to John, well written and in good spirits-I am sorry to hear that Father is so unwell, suffering from risings on his neck, which John thinks more seriously of than he expresses to the family at home. John and family are quite well excepting the children have feverish colds and Eliza is worn down with the baby. John is fatigued for want of rest, he is up at night with Mr Marshall (?) too. Nothing has been done to the house yet except that John saw a carpenter who examined it, and said the thoughts all that was necessary was to change the gutter, Mr McReilly's son died on Thursday, therefore John did not wish to mention it to him-. My dearest Brother would you not think it well to speak to Henrietta, for her neglect of duty as a wife and housekeeper. It is really a shame for her to act as she does. I don't know what kind of a conscience she [End Page 3] has to approach the sacraments and neglect her duties as she does-A lady from Cheraw told me this evening that she never was at home-Some one else asked if Francis and his wife were separated-And she does not hesitate to say that her mother and sister wish her to remain in Charleston, and she never would return to Cheraw, if she was not obliged to do so-I feel very much tempted to write her a lecture-the illegible of her! If I were in Francis place, I would not pay a cent for her while in Charleston, but while in Cheraw she should have every comfort, and she should be at her post of duty-she never will like it, as long as she remains absent from it-. I suppose you think my dearest Brother it is time to stop after this tirade-Well, the final with me is "Deo Gratias I am a Religious" and we feel this especially after being in the parlor, and hearing the details of every day life-I do not think my dearest Brother that our Sisters are able to fast during Lent, and labor too-will you give me the power to direct them according to their [End Page 4]
  • Image 01
    JMJ Ursuline Convent Feb 24th/59 My Dearest Brother I suppose if I were to wait until tomorrow or the next day I might say something of Miss Ryan's arrival, but I feel as if I would like a little "chat" with you, so I will obey the impulse and talk on-I was called to the parlor a few evenings since to accept a very pretty present of the "Lives of the Saints" from a little French woman of church who said she bought them in Paris last summer, and begged my acceptance of them in pretty good English-I soon perceived that the books were a mere pretext, and learned that "Marie Charlotte Fearenbach" wished to be a Religious, and was willing, to do all she might be told, she only feared she could not be received because she was not good enough, or might be sent away. Along the side: appetites? When will you start for the Bahamas? I would think is more pleasant in the cool, than warm weather-Please write soon and pray for us all, especially for your own sister Ellen Sis M Baptiste Superior [End Page 1] She is twenty-eight years of age, I think she said, healthy and has learned embroidery as a trade together with millinery-and for the last three years has been a sort of ladies-maid, and work woman in respectable families, to avoid boarding among all sorts of people, since her sisters death. I like her merry countenance, and her capacity for embroidery, and with your permission will give her a trial. I gave her no decided answer, but told her to pray and consult Father Joseph who is her Confessor. He says she is as good a Catholic as is in Columbia-Today I read a short letter from L Condy who defers to some indefinite period, the realization of her designs, and cannot even visit Columbia. It is all for the best, and I think it well not to urge the matter at all farther-. Sister Ursula objected very much to our letting her stay in the convent, so I am glad she is not coming-We are all very well thank God. I felt a little alarmed about Ellen Spann yesterday, and sent for John in a great hurry, fearing she had the scarlet fever which is so prevalent. [End Page 2] happily my fears were groundless, and she is better today. I saw a letter from Bernard to John, well written and in good spirits-I am sorry to hear that Father is so unwell, suffering from risings on his neck, which John thinks more seriously of than he expresses to the family at home. John and family are quite well excepting the children have feverish colds and Eliza is worn down with the baby. John is fatigued for want of rest, he is up at night with Mr Marshall (?) too. Nothing has been done to the house yet except that John saw a carpenter who examined it, and said the thoughts all that was necessary was to change the gutter, Mr McReilly's son died on Thursday, therefore John did not wish to mention it to him-. My dearest Brother would you not think it well to speak to Henrietta, for her neglect of duty as a wife and housekeeper. It is really a shame for her to act as she does. I don't know what kind of a conscience she [End Page 3] has to approach the sacraments and neglect her duties as she does-A lady from Cheraw told me this evening that she never was at home-Some one else asked if Francis and his wife were separated-And she does not hesitate to say that her mother and sister wish her to remain in Charleston, and she never would return to Cheraw, if she was not obliged to do so-I feel very much tempted to write her a lecture-the illegible of her! If I were in Francis place, I would not pay a cent for her while in Charleston, but while in Cheraw she should have every comfort, and she should be at her post of duty-she never will like it, as long as she remains absent from it-. I suppose you think my dearest Brother it is time to stop after this tirade-Well, the final with me is "Deo Gratias I am a Religious" and we feel this especially after being in the parlor, and hearing the details of every day life-I do not think my dearest Brother that our Sisters are able to fast during Lent, and labor too-will you give me the power to direct them according to their [End Page 4]
Title:
033. Madame Baptiste to Bp Patrick Lynch -- February 24, 1859
Creator:
Lynch, Madame Baptiste
Date:
1859-02-24
Description:
Letter from Madame Baptiste to Bishop Patrick Lynch telling him about a French woman who had given her a gift as a "pretext" for being considered as a lay sister in the Ursuline Convent. She also asks the Bishop to speak to their sister-in-law, Henrietta, about "her neglect of duty as a wife and housekeeper" for staying in Charleston so long instead of her home in Cheraw. February 24, 1859. 4p.
Collection:
Lynch Family Letters, 1858-1866
Contributing Institution:
Catholic Diocese of Charleston Archives
Media Type:
Manuscripts
Personal or Corporate Subject:
Lynch family, Catholic Church--South Carolina--Columbia
Topical Subject:
Ursulines--South Carolina--Columbia, Convents--South Carolina--Columbia, Boarding schools--South Carolina--Columbia
Shelving Locator:
Box_13_D05_Page_01.jpg
S.C. County:
Charleston County (S.C.)
Internet Media Type:
image/jpeg
Copyright Status Statement:
Digital image copyright 2010, The Catholic Diocese of Charleston Archives. All rights reserved. For more information contact The Catholic Diocese of Charleston Archives, Charleston, SC 29424.