092. Willis Keith to Maddie Keith -- July 30, 1863

  • Image 01
    Camp near Culpeper, July 30th, 1863 Dear Maddie, I do not remember which of you girls I owe the first letter to. But I think it is you. I have had, all through Pennsylvania, envelopes directed to you all. I got Mamas letter of the 21st two days ago. Six days after it was written. You may imagine what a treat it was to me, as the date of the last that I had received previously was the 21st of June, [exactly?] one month before. I think that you all treated me badly in not writing, while I was in Pennsylvania. I would have gotten all the letters when I returned. Now do write immediately, and tell me what you are all doing. Who are in the[End Page 1] house. Who you go to see. Who comes to see you. And everything. I will be a week tomorrow since we got here. The rest has made me feel like a new man. If Paris would only turn up now, I would be perfectly happy, in the hope of getting home for ten days next winter. I wrote to Mama on Sunday. To Aunt Virginia day before yesterday, and to Jennie today. And so Johny got up to see you all. How lucky he is. It seems to me that ten days with you all now, would for me up for another years campaign. This has been the hardest that I have had to go through yet. We were across the Potomac nearly three weeks, and I am sure that we did not have four clear days, while we were[End Page 2] there. Imagine us some nights, marching all night through the pouring rain, and arriving so late at camp on others, that the wagons with our blankets, could not come up, and the ground being one pool of water, having to stand up in the rain till morning, when we would start again. Sometimes it rained so hard that we could not even make fires, and had to stand all night in the cold, and dark. I hope that we may never have such a time again. If the war were to end now, I would ride my horse home. I am quite attached to her, so has carried me through so much. She is a very pretty little sorrel mare. She would make a beautiful buggy horse, and it would be so pleasant to have her in a nice little buggy in Charleston. I wrote[End Page 3] to Papa last week to Anderson. Did the letter arrive? I have written to Johny three times since he has written to me. Is Papa trying to get me a boy. I hope he is. Is Miss Busy Whaley up there still, and are you as great friends as ever. Do remember me to her, if she is. I am very anxious to hear how Grandma is. Mama said that she was quite well again, and thought that she was at Flat Rock. I am hoping for a letter this evening. How I do wish that they would send our Brigade down to Charleston. There is not a man in it, but would be willing to go forward in the front line, to storm the Yankees off Morris Island. Do write soon. Love to all. Your Affectionate Brother, W. [End Page 4] W.W. Keith Asst. Surgeon 12th Regt. S.C.V. Mrs. P.T. Keith Anderson C.H. So.Ca.[End Page 5]
  • Image 01
    Camp near Culpeper, July 30th, 1863 Dear Maddie, I do not remember which of you girls I owe the first letter to. But I think it is you. I have had, all through Pennsylvania, envelopes directed to you all. I got Mamas letter of the 21st two days ago. Six days after it was written. You may imagine what a treat it was to me, as the date of the last that I had received previously was the 21st of June, [exactly?] one month before. I think that you all treated me badly in not writing, while I was in Pennsylvania. I would have gotten all the letters when I returned. Now do write immediately, and tell me what you are all doing. Who are in the[End Page 1] house. Who you go to see. Who comes to see you. And everything. I will be a week tomorrow since we got here. The rest has made me feel like a new man. If Paris would only turn up now, I would be perfectly happy, in the hope of getting home for ten days next winter. I wrote to Mama on Sunday. To Aunt Virginia day before yesterday, and to Jennie today. And so Johny got up to see you all. How lucky he is. It seems to me that ten days with you all now, would for me up for another years campaign. This has been the hardest that I have had to go through yet. We were across the Potomac nearly three weeks, and I am sure that we did not have four clear days, while we were[End Page 2] there. Imagine us some nights, marching all night through the pouring rain, and arriving so late at camp on others, that the wagons with our blankets, could not come up, and the ground being one pool of water, having to stand up in the rain till morning, when we would start again. Sometimes it rained so hard that we could not even make fires, and had to stand all night in the cold, and dark. I hope that we may never have such a time again. If the war were to end now, I would ride my horse home. I am quite attached to her, so has carried me through so much. She is a very pretty little sorrel mare. She would make a beautiful buggy horse, and it would be so pleasant to have her in a nice little buggy in Charleston. I wrote[End Page 3] to Papa last week to Anderson. Did the letter arrive? I have written to Johny three times since he has written to me. Is Papa trying to get me a boy. I hope he is. Is Miss Busy Whaley up there still, and are you as great friends as ever. Do remember me to her, if she is. I am very anxious to hear how Grandma is. Mama said that she was quite well again, and thought that she was at Flat Rock. I am hoping for a letter this evening. How I do wish that they would send our Brigade down to Charleston. There is not a man in it, but would be willing to go forward in the front line, to storm the Yankees off Morris Island. Do write soon. Love to all. Your Affectionate Brother, W. [End Page 4] W.W. Keith Asst. Surgeon 12th Regt. S.C.V. Mrs. P.T. Keith Anderson C.H. So.Ca.[End Page 5]
  • Image 01
    Camp near Culpeper, July 30th, 1863 Dear Maddie, I do not remember which of you girls I owe the first letter to. But I think it is you. I have had, all through Pennsylvania, envelopes directed to you all. I got Mamas letter of the 21st two days ago. Six days after it was written. You may imagine what a treat it was to me, as the date of the last that I had received previously was the 21st of June, [exactly?] one month before. I think that you all treated me badly in not writing, while I was in Pennsylvania. I would have gotten all the letters when I returned. Now do write immediately, and tell me what you are all doing. Who are in the[End Page 1] house. Who you go to see. Who comes to see you. And everything. I will be a week tomorrow since we got here. The rest has made me feel like a new man. If Paris would only turn up now, I would be perfectly happy, in the hope of getting home for ten days next winter. I wrote to Mama on Sunday. To Aunt Virginia day before yesterday, and to Jennie today. And so Johny got up to see you all. How lucky he is. It seems to me that ten days with you all now, would for me up for another years campaign. This has been the hardest that I have had to go through yet. We were across the Potomac nearly three weeks, and I am sure that we did not have four clear days, while we were[End Page 2] there. Imagine us some nights, marching all night through the pouring rain, and arriving so late at camp on others, that the wagons with our blankets, could not come up, and the ground being one pool of water, having to stand up in the rain till morning, when we would start again. Sometimes it rained so hard that we could not even make fires, and had to stand all night in the cold, and dark. I hope that we may never have such a time again. If the war were to end now, I would ride my horse home. I am quite attached to her, so has carried me through so much. She is a very pretty little sorrel mare. She would make a beautiful buggy horse, and it would be so pleasant to have her in a nice little buggy in Charleston. I wrote[End Page 3] to Papa last week to Anderson. Did the letter arrive? I have written to Johny three times since he has written to me. Is Papa trying to get me a boy. I hope he is. Is Miss Busy Whaley up there still, and are you as great friends as ever. Do remember me to her, if she is. I am very anxious to hear how Grandma is. Mama said that she was quite well again, and thought that she was at Flat Rock. I am hoping for a letter this evening. How I do wish that they would send our Brigade down to Charleston. There is not a man in it, but would be willing to go forward in the front line, to storm the Yankees off Morris Island. Do write soon. Love to all. Your Affectionate Brother, W. [End Page 4] W.W. Keith Asst. Surgeon 12th Regt. S.C.V. Mrs. P.T. Keith Anderson C.H. So.Ca.[End Page 5]
  • Image 01
    Camp near Culpeper, July 30th, 1863 Dear Maddie, I do not remember which of you girls I owe the first letter to. But I think it is you. I have had, all through Pennsylvania, envelopes directed to you all. I got Mamas letter of the 21st two days ago. Six days after it was written. You may imagine what a treat it was to me, as the date of the last that I had received previously was the 21st of June, [exactly?] one month before. I think that you all treated me badly in not writing, while I was in Pennsylvania. I would have gotten all the letters when I returned. Now do write immediately, and tell me what you are all doing. Who are in the[End Page 1] house. Who you go to see. Who comes to see you. And everything. I will be a week tomorrow since we got here. The rest has made me feel like a new man. If Paris would only turn up now, I would be perfectly happy, in the hope of getting home for ten days next winter. I wrote to Mama on Sunday. To Aunt Virginia day before yesterday, and to Jennie today. And so Johny got up to see you all. How lucky he is. It seems to me that ten days with you all now, would for me up for another years campaign. This has been the hardest that I have had to go through yet. We were across the Potomac nearly three weeks, and I am sure that we did not have four clear days, while we were[End Page 2] there. Imagine us some nights, marching all night through the pouring rain, and arriving so late at camp on others, that the wagons with our blankets, could not come up, and the ground being one pool of water, having to stand up in the rain till morning, when we would start again. Sometimes it rained so hard that we could not even make fires, and had to stand all night in the cold, and dark. I hope that we may never have such a time again. If the war were to end now, I would ride my horse home. I am quite attached to her, so has carried me through so much. She is a very pretty little sorrel mare. She would make a beautiful buggy horse, and it would be so pleasant to have her in a nice little buggy in Charleston. I wrote[End Page 3] to Papa last week to Anderson. Did the letter arrive? I have written to Johny three times since he has written to me. Is Papa trying to get me a boy. I hope he is. Is Miss Busy Whaley up there still, and are you as great friends as ever. Do remember me to her, if she is. I am very anxious to hear how Grandma is. Mama said that she was quite well again, and thought that she was at Flat Rock. I am hoping for a letter this evening. How I do wish that they would send our Brigade down to Charleston. There is not a man in it, but would be willing to go forward in the front line, to storm the Yankees off Morris Island. Do write soon. Love to all. Your Affectionate Brother, W. [End Page 4] W.W. Keith Asst. Surgeon 12th Regt. S.C.V. Mrs. P.T. Keith Anderson C.H. So.Ca.[End Page 5]
  • Image 01
    Camp near Culpeper, July 30th, 1863 Dear Maddie, I do not remember which of you girls I owe the first letter to. But I think it is you. I have had, all through Pennsylvania, envelopes directed to you all. I got Mamas letter of the 21st two days ago. Six days after it was written. You may imagine what a treat it was to me, as the date of the last that I had received previously was the 21st of June, [exactly?] one month before. I think that you all treated me badly in not writing, while I was in Pennsylvania. I would have gotten all the letters when I returned. Now do write immediately, and tell me what you are all doing. Who are in the[End Page 1] house. Who you go to see. Who comes to see you. And everything. I will be a week tomorrow since we got here. The rest has made me feel like a new man. If Paris would only turn up now, I would be perfectly happy, in the hope of getting home for ten days next winter. I wrote to Mama on Sunday. To Aunt Virginia day before yesterday, and to Jennie today. And so Johny got up to see you all. How lucky he is. It seems to me that ten days with you all now, would for me up for another years campaign. This has been the hardest that I have had to go through yet. We were across the Potomac nearly three weeks, and I am sure that we did not have four clear days, while we were[End Page 2] there. Imagine us some nights, marching all night through the pouring rain, and arriving so late at camp on others, that the wagons with our blankets, could not come up, and the ground being one pool of water, having to stand up in the rain till morning, when we would start again. Sometimes it rained so hard that we could not even make fires, and had to stand all night in the cold, and dark. I hope that we may never have such a time again. If the war were to end now, I would ride my horse home. I am quite attached to her, so has carried me through so much. She is a very pretty little sorrel mare. She would make a beautiful buggy horse, and it would be so pleasant to have her in a nice little buggy in Charleston. I wrote[End Page 3] to Papa last week to Anderson. Did the letter arrive? I have written to Johny three times since he has written to me. Is Papa trying to get me a boy. I hope he is. Is Miss Busy Whaley up there still, and are you as great friends as ever. Do remember me to her, if she is. I am very anxious to hear how Grandma is. Mama said that she was quite well again, and thought that she was at Flat Rock. I am hoping for a letter this evening. How I do wish that they would send our Brigade down to Charleston. There is not a man in it, but would be willing to go forward in the front line, to storm the Yankees off Morris Island. Do write soon. Love to all. Your Affectionate Brother, W. [End Page 4] W.W. Keith Asst. Surgeon 12th Regt. S.C.V. Mrs. P.T. Keith Anderson C.H. So.Ca.[End Page 5]
Title:
092. Willis Keith to Maddie Keith -- July 30, 1863
Creator:
Wilkinson and Keith Families
Date:
1863-07-30
Description:
Willis writes from near Culpeper, Va., on the miserable marching at the Potomac; his impressive horse and the desire of the Regiment to go to S.to "storm the Yankees off Morris Island"
Collection:
Wilkinson-Keith Family Papers
Contributing Institution:
College of Charleston Libraries
Media Type:
Manuscripts
Personal or Corporate Subject:
Confederate States of America. Army
Topical Subject:
Morris Island, Battle of, S.C., 1863 (July 10-September 7)
Geographic Subject:
United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865
Shelving Locator:
Mss 0111
S.C. County:
Charleston County (S.C.)
Internet Media Type:
image/jpeg
Digitization Specifications:
600 ppi, 24-bit depth, color, Epson Expression 10000XL scanner, Archival Master is a tiff.
Copyright Status Statement:
Digital image copyright 2010, The College of Charleston Libraries. All rights reserved. For more information contact The College of Charleston Library, Charleston, SC 29424.