091. Willis Keith to Anna Bell Keith -- July 19, 1863

  • Image 01
    Camp near Winchester, July 19th, 1863 Dear Mama, I wrote to you two days ago, but I am afraid that my letters do not reach you. I can not understand why it is that I do not hear from you. Several mails have come in lately, and yet the last I had from you was the 21st of June, nearly a month. I am quite uneasy. Did you get my letters from Pennsylvania, and Maryland? In my last I told you my loss of Paris. It is now ten days since he disappeared, and I have no hopes of ever seeing him again. I have led a very disagreeable life since his loss. I have to attend to my horse by myself. And it is only sometimes that I can hire any one[End Page 1] to cook or wash for me, so that I have to go sometimes without eating, and in very dirty cloths. I begged you to urge it on Papa to try and get me [a?] boy some how. Savie says that when he left Charleston a month ago there was a free boy named Joe Magill, an acquaintance, of Mrs. Potts James, whom he had before, who wanted to come with him. James can tell Papa where to find him, and if he cannot find him, he may know of some other who could come. Papa can find James by enquiring of Ellen, at Aunt Marys yard. I will be willing to give $20 or even $25 a month, if necessary, rather than do without. Dr. Bailey has no boy, so that I have[End Page 2] no one to do a hands turn for me. We expect to get a mail tonight and I hope to get letters from you by it. I am feeling rather [disponding?]. Our reverse in Pennsylvania, and then the far greater blow, the loss of Vicksburg, and Port Hudson, look gloomy for the Confederacy. I believe that a mail will go off tomorrow morning. If I have time I will finish this sheet then. It is getting dark now. I rather think that will have to be quiet now for some time to come. I hope that we will move nearer Richmond again. We have had a hard time since the 5th of June, when we left Camp Gregg. It seems to me almost like a [illegible]. It was seven months yesterday since I parted with you on the cars.[End Page 3] We have never been separated so long before. How I do long to see you again! Your Own Affect. W. Monday Morning, July 20th I do not know whether I can get this off today, but I will try. I am quite well, and we are very quiet. We are now camped half way between Martinsburg, and Winchester. About eleven miles from each. I wish that we would commence a move for the other side of the mountain. The only pair of pants, that I have, I captured on the battlefield. My own were broken, so I slipped them off, and these on. I have one of the flannel shirts I brought with me, and one striped cotton shirt that I captured, and change from one to the other. So you see my wardrobe is small. I do hope to hear from you today. Your Affect. W. [End Page 4] W.W. Keith Asst. Surgeon S.C.V. Mrs. P.T. Keith Anderson C.H. So.Ca.[End Page 5]
  • Image 01
    Camp near Winchester, July 19th, 1863 Dear Mama, I wrote to you two days ago, but I am afraid that my letters do not reach you. I can not understand why it is that I do not hear from you. Several mails have come in lately, and yet the last I had from you was the 21st of June, nearly a month. I am quite uneasy. Did you get my letters from Pennsylvania, and Maryland? In my last I told you my loss of Paris. It is now ten days since he disappeared, and I have no hopes of ever seeing him again. I have led a very disagreeable life since his loss. I have to attend to my horse by myself. And it is only sometimes that I can hire any one[End Page 1] to cook or wash for me, so that I have to go sometimes without eating, and in very dirty cloths. I begged you to urge it on Papa to try and get me [a?] boy some how. Savie says that when he left Charleston a month ago there was a free boy named Joe Magill, an acquaintance, of Mrs. Potts James, whom he had before, who wanted to come with him. James can tell Papa where to find him, and if he cannot find him, he may know of some other who could come. Papa can find James by enquiring of Ellen, at Aunt Marys yard. I will be willing to give $20 or even $25 a month, if necessary, rather than do without. Dr. Bailey has no boy, so that I have[End Page 2] no one to do a hands turn for me. We expect to get a mail tonight and I hope to get letters from you by it. I am feeling rather [disponding?]. Our reverse in Pennsylvania, and then the far greater blow, the loss of Vicksburg, and Port Hudson, look gloomy for the Confederacy. I believe that a mail will go off tomorrow morning. If I have time I will finish this sheet then. It is getting dark now. I rather think that will have to be quiet now for some time to come. I hope that we will move nearer Richmond again. We have had a hard time since the 5th of June, when we left Camp Gregg. It seems to me almost like a [illegible]. It was seven months yesterday since I parted with you on the cars.[End Page 3] We have never been separated so long before. How I do long to see you again! Your Own Affect. W. Monday Morning, July 20th I do not know whether I can get this off today, but I will try. I am quite well, and we are very quiet. We are now camped half way between Martinsburg, and Winchester. About eleven miles from each. I wish that we would commence a move for the other side of the mountain. The only pair of pants, that I have, I captured on the battlefield. My own were broken, so I slipped them off, and these on. I have one of the flannel shirts I brought with me, and one striped cotton shirt that I captured, and change from one to the other. So you see my wardrobe is small. I do hope to hear from you today. Your Affect. W. [End Page 4] W.W. Keith Asst. Surgeon S.C.V. Mrs. P.T. Keith Anderson C.H. So.Ca.[End Page 5]
  • Image 01
    Camp near Winchester, July 19th, 1863 Dear Mama, I wrote to you two days ago, but I am afraid that my letters do not reach you. I can not understand why it is that I do not hear from you. Several mails have come in lately, and yet the last I had from you was the 21st of June, nearly a month. I am quite uneasy. Did you get my letters from Pennsylvania, and Maryland? In my last I told you my loss of Paris. It is now ten days since he disappeared, and I have no hopes of ever seeing him again. I have led a very disagreeable life since his loss. I have to attend to my horse by myself. And it is only sometimes that I can hire any one[End Page 1] to cook or wash for me, so that I have to go sometimes without eating, and in very dirty cloths. I begged you to urge it on Papa to try and get me [a?] boy some how. Savie says that when he left Charleston a month ago there was a free boy named Joe Magill, an acquaintance, of Mrs. Potts James, whom he had before, who wanted to come with him. James can tell Papa where to find him, and if he cannot find him, he may know of some other who could come. Papa can find James by enquiring of Ellen, at Aunt Marys yard. I will be willing to give $20 or even $25 a month, if necessary, rather than do without. Dr. Bailey has no boy, so that I have[End Page 2] no one to do a hands turn for me. We expect to get a mail tonight and I hope to get letters from you by it. I am feeling rather [disponding?]. Our reverse in Pennsylvania, and then the far greater blow, the loss of Vicksburg, and Port Hudson, look gloomy for the Confederacy. I believe that a mail will go off tomorrow morning. If I have time I will finish this sheet then. It is getting dark now. I rather think that will have to be quiet now for some time to come. I hope that we will move nearer Richmond again. We have had a hard time since the 5th of June, when we left Camp Gregg. It seems to me almost like a [illegible]. It was seven months yesterday since I parted with you on the cars.[End Page 3] We have never been separated so long before. How I do long to see you again! Your Own Affect. W. Monday Morning, July 20th I do not know whether I can get this off today, but I will try. I am quite well, and we are very quiet. We are now camped half way between Martinsburg, and Winchester. About eleven miles from each. I wish that we would commence a move for the other side of the mountain. The only pair of pants, that I have, I captured on the battlefield. My own were broken, so I slipped them off, and these on. I have one of the flannel shirts I brought with me, and one striped cotton shirt that I captured, and change from one to the other. So you see my wardrobe is small. I do hope to hear from you today. Your Affect. W. [End Page 4] W.W. Keith Asst. Surgeon S.C.V. Mrs. P.T. Keith Anderson C.H. So.Ca.[End Page 5]
  • Image 01
    Camp near Winchester, July 19th, 1863 Dear Mama, I wrote to you two days ago, but I am afraid that my letters do not reach you. I can not understand why it is that I do not hear from you. Several mails have come in lately, and yet the last I had from you was the 21st of June, nearly a month. I am quite uneasy. Did you get my letters from Pennsylvania, and Maryland? In my last I told you my loss of Paris. It is now ten days since he disappeared, and I have no hopes of ever seeing him again. I have led a very disagreeable life since his loss. I have to attend to my horse by myself. And it is only sometimes that I can hire any one[End Page 1] to cook or wash for me, so that I have to go sometimes without eating, and in very dirty cloths. I begged you to urge it on Papa to try and get me [a?] boy some how. Savie says that when he left Charleston a month ago there was a free boy named Joe Magill, an acquaintance, of Mrs. Potts James, whom he had before, who wanted to come with him. James can tell Papa where to find him, and if he cannot find him, he may know of some other who could come. Papa can find James by enquiring of Ellen, at Aunt Marys yard. I will be willing to give $20 or even $25 a month, if necessary, rather than do without. Dr. Bailey has no boy, so that I have[End Page 2] no one to do a hands turn for me. We expect to get a mail tonight and I hope to get letters from you by it. I am feeling rather [disponding?]. Our reverse in Pennsylvania, and then the far greater blow, the loss of Vicksburg, and Port Hudson, look gloomy for the Confederacy. I believe that a mail will go off tomorrow morning. If I have time I will finish this sheet then. It is getting dark now. I rather think that will have to be quiet now for some time to come. I hope that we will move nearer Richmond again. We have had a hard time since the 5th of June, when we left Camp Gregg. It seems to me almost like a [illegible]. It was seven months yesterday since I parted with you on the cars.[End Page 3] We have never been separated so long before. How I do long to see you again! Your Own Affect. W. Monday Morning, July 20th I do not know whether I can get this off today, but I will try. I am quite well, and we are very quiet. We are now camped half way between Martinsburg, and Winchester. About eleven miles from each. I wish that we would commence a move for the other side of the mountain. The only pair of pants, that I have, I captured on the battlefield. My own were broken, so I slipped them off, and these on. I have one of the flannel shirts I brought with me, and one striped cotton shirt that I captured, and change from one to the other. So you see my wardrobe is small. I do hope to hear from you today. Your Affect. W. [End Page 4] W.W. Keith Asst. Surgeon S.C.V. Mrs. P.T. Keith Anderson C.H. So.Ca.[End Page 5]
  • Image 01
    Camp near Winchester, July 19th, 1863 Dear Mama, I wrote to you two days ago, but I am afraid that my letters do not reach you. I can not understand why it is that I do not hear from you. Several mails have come in lately, and yet the last I had from you was the 21st of June, nearly a month. I am quite uneasy. Did you get my letters from Pennsylvania, and Maryland? In my last I told you my loss of Paris. It is now ten days since he disappeared, and I have no hopes of ever seeing him again. I have led a very disagreeable life since his loss. I have to attend to my horse by myself. And it is only sometimes that I can hire any one[End Page 1] to cook or wash for me, so that I have to go sometimes without eating, and in very dirty cloths. I begged you to urge it on Papa to try and get me [a?] boy some how. Savie says that when he left Charleston a month ago there was a free boy named Joe Magill, an acquaintance, of Mrs. Potts James, whom he had before, who wanted to come with him. James can tell Papa where to find him, and if he cannot find him, he may know of some other who could come. Papa can find James by enquiring of Ellen, at Aunt Marys yard. I will be willing to give $20 or even $25 a month, if necessary, rather than do without. Dr. Bailey has no boy, so that I have[End Page 2] no one to do a hands turn for me. We expect to get a mail tonight and I hope to get letters from you by it. I am feeling rather [disponding?]. Our reverse in Pennsylvania, and then the far greater blow, the loss of Vicksburg, and Port Hudson, look gloomy for the Confederacy. I believe that a mail will go off tomorrow morning. If I have time I will finish this sheet then. It is getting dark now. I rather think that will have to be quiet now for some time to come. I hope that we will move nearer Richmond again. We have had a hard time since the 5th of June, when we left Camp Gregg. It seems to me almost like a [illegible]. It was seven months yesterday since I parted with you on the cars.[End Page 3] We have never been separated so long before. How I do long to see you again! Your Own Affect. W. Monday Morning, July 20th I do not know whether I can get this off today, but I will try. I am quite well, and we are very quiet. We are now camped half way between Martinsburg, and Winchester. About eleven miles from each. I wish that we would commence a move for the other side of the mountain. The only pair of pants, that I have, I captured on the battlefield. My own were broken, so I slipped them off, and these on. I have one of the flannel shirts I brought with me, and one striped cotton shirt that I captured, and change from one to the other. So you see my wardrobe is small. I do hope to hear from you today. Your Affect. W. [End Page 4] W.W. Keith Asst. Surgeon S.C.V. Mrs. P.T. Keith Anderson C.H. So.Ca.[End Page 5]
Title:
091. Willis Keith to Anna Bell Keith -- July 19, 1863
Creator:
Wilkinson and Keith Families
Date:
1863-07-19
Description:
Willis writes from Winchester, Va., on Paris having "disappeared" and being left with no-one "to do a hands turn for me"; his reflection: "Our reverse in Pennsylvania, and then the far greater blow, the loss of Vicksburg, and Port Hudson, look gloomy for the Confederacy"; his taking pants from a corpse? on the battlefield.
Collection:
Wilkinson-Keith Family Papers
Contributing Institution:
College of Charleston Libraries
Media Type:
Manuscripts
Personal or Corporate Subject:
Confederate States of America. Army
Topical Subject:
Gettysburg, Battle of, Gettysburg, Pa., 1863
Geographic Subject:
United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865, Vicksburg (Miss.)--History--Siege, 1863
Shelving Locator:
Mss 0111
S.C. County:
Charleston County (S.C.)
Internet Media Type:
image/jpeg
Digitization Specifications:
600 ppi, 24-bit depth, color, Epson Expression 10000XL scanner, Archival Master is a tiff.
Copyright Status Statement:
Digital image copyright 2010, The College of Charleston Libraries. All rights reserved. For more information contact The College of Charleston Library, Charleston, SC 29424.