069. Willis Keith to Anna Bell Keith -- August 15, 1862

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    Bivouac near Orange C.H., August 15th 1862 My Dear Mama, I received your letter of the 5th day before yesterday. Also Nan's and Mimm's, for which thank them. I got yours of the 7th yesterday. I feel in better spirits today in consequence, than I have for a month past. I suppose that that is the effect also of the invaluable gift accompanying your last. Is it not strange? we seem to think together. I was intending only the day before to ask you in my next letter to send me your likeness. And lo and behold, it came, at the wish. All of your letters seem to come now, and they do cheer me up in my solitude. Poor Johny. He always was, and I am afraid always will be the most careless of mortals. I wrote to you day before yesterday, and to Johny, the day before that. Did Papa and Maria, and Aunt Sarah, get the letters I wrote them last week? I got a letter from Uncle M. day before yesterday, saying that he did not like to ask any more[End Page 1] favors at the Sury? Gents, as he had been obliged to ask for a furlough for Sam. So that is all over. I am perfectly astounded as what you tell me of Henry Jervey. Do write immediately and tell me all about it. And only think, after reading your letter yesterday evening, I went over to the 1st Regt. to tell Pinckney Seabrook about it, and when I got there I met Eddie Stuart, who told me that he had just received a letter from Barnie, announcing his engagement of my two most intimate friends, on the same day. Two of our old trio. It made me feel sad for a while. I felt as if our old associations were being broken up. I have written to both of them this morning. Barnie is engaged to Miss Emma Lee of Camden. And from what I[End Page 2] know of him, I judge of her. I know that his requirements are most strict, as to the character of her who is to be the partner of his future wife. Yet though I see them all doing this, I cannot yet reallize [sic] how I can ever allow any other affection to equal that which I bear to the authors of my being, and the mother from whose anxious thoughts I have never been absent one single day since my birth. I am so glad that you enjoy yourself where you are. And as it is cheaper than keeping house, I hope that you will stay there as long as possible. I hardly think that I will be able to get home now before the end of the War, when I resign my commission. Do give my love to [Nam?], and tell him that I will write to her soon. Tell her she has given me such a glowing description her friend Bury, that I find my self quite falling in love with her. Ask Ella to write[End Page 3] ... [Note written at the top of page 2: There is no use to fret on two ten cent stamps, as the letters are forwarded from Richmond to the army. Always put 12th Regt. S.C.V. Gregg's Brigade.] ...to me too. And also [Movrie?]. You say that the others are in Charleston. I am sure I hope that it is a mistake, about Mr. [Parky?] Brown's wound. Tell me in your next how he is getting on. Do tell me all that you can learn about Miss Western. How old she is, and if she is well off in the world. We came up with our wagons yesterday for about an hour. I seized the opportunity, to take out my carpet bag, and went into the woods, and had a good wash, and changed my clothing. Uncle M. exaggerated my sickness, and I am now quite well again. Do try and find out if my [Filat?] Ruck letters were received. I am afraid that this is too late for the mail today, so that I will have to send it tomorrow. I feel actually gay today, in consequence of those letters. I write you you about twice a week now. Ask Papa to write. Your Own Affect. Son, W.[End Page 4] Soldiers Letter from W.W. Keith Asst. Surgeon 12th Regt. S.C.V. Mrs. P.T. Keith Anderson C.H. So. Ca. [End Page 5]
  • Image 01
    Bivouac near Orange C.H., August 15th 1862 My Dear Mama, I received your letter of the 5th day before yesterday. Also Nan's and Mimm's, for which thank them. I got yours of the 7th yesterday. I feel in better spirits today in consequence, than I have for a month past. I suppose that that is the effect also of the invaluable gift accompanying your last. Is it not strange? we seem to think together. I was intending only the day before to ask you in my next letter to send me your likeness. And lo and behold, it came, at the wish. All of your letters seem to come now, and they do cheer me up in my solitude. Poor Johny. He always was, and I am afraid always will be the most careless of mortals. I wrote to you day before yesterday, and to Johny, the day before that. Did Papa and Maria, and Aunt Sarah, get the letters I wrote them last week? I got a letter from Uncle M. day before yesterday, saying that he did not like to ask any more[End Page 1] favors at the Sury? Gents, as he had been obliged to ask for a furlough for Sam. So that is all over. I am perfectly astounded as what you tell me of Henry Jervey. Do write immediately and tell me all about it. And only think, after reading your letter yesterday evening, I went over to the 1st Regt. to tell Pinckney Seabrook about it, and when I got there I met Eddie Stuart, who told me that he had just received a letter from Barnie, announcing his engagement of my two most intimate friends, on the same day. Two of our old trio. It made me feel sad for a while. I felt as if our old associations were being broken up. I have written to both of them this morning. Barnie is engaged to Miss Emma Lee of Camden. And from what I[End Page 2] know of him, I judge of her. I know that his requirements are most strict, as to the character of her who is to be the partner of his future wife. Yet though I see them all doing this, I cannot yet reallize [sic] how I can ever allow any other affection to equal that which I bear to the authors of my being, and the mother from whose anxious thoughts I have never been absent one single day since my birth. I am so glad that you enjoy yourself where you are. And as it is cheaper than keeping house, I hope that you will stay there as long as possible. I hardly think that I will be able to get home now before the end of the War, when I resign my commission. Do give my love to [Nam?], and tell him that I will write to her soon. Tell her she has given me such a glowing description her friend Bury, that I find my self quite falling in love with her. Ask Ella to write[End Page 3] ... [Note written at the top of page 2: There is no use to fret on two ten cent stamps, as the letters are forwarded from Richmond to the army. Always put 12th Regt. S.C.V. Gregg's Brigade.] ...to me too. And also [Movrie?]. You say that the others are in Charleston. I am sure I hope that it is a mistake, about Mr. [Parky?] Brown's wound. Tell me in your next how he is getting on. Do tell me all that you can learn about Miss Western. How old she is, and if she is well off in the world. We came up with our wagons yesterday for about an hour. I seized the opportunity, to take out my carpet bag, and went into the woods, and had a good wash, and changed my clothing. Uncle M. exaggerated my sickness, and I am now quite well again. Do try and find out if my [Filat?] Ruck letters were received. I am afraid that this is too late for the mail today, so that I will have to send it tomorrow. I feel actually gay today, in consequence of those letters. I write you you about twice a week now. Ask Papa to write. Your Own Affect. Son, W.[End Page 4] Soldiers Letter from W.W. Keith Asst. Surgeon 12th Regt. S.C.V. Mrs. P.T. Keith Anderson C.H. So. Ca. [End Page 5]
  • Image 01
    Bivouac near Orange C.H., August 15th 1862 My Dear Mama, I received your letter of the 5th day before yesterday. Also Nan's and Mimm's, for which thank them. I got yours of the 7th yesterday. I feel in better spirits today in consequence, than I have for a month past. I suppose that that is the effect also of the invaluable gift accompanying your last. Is it not strange? we seem to think together. I was intending only the day before to ask you in my next letter to send me your likeness. And lo and behold, it came, at the wish. All of your letters seem to come now, and they do cheer me up in my solitude. Poor Johny. He always was, and I am afraid always will be the most careless of mortals. I wrote to you day before yesterday, and to Johny, the day before that. Did Papa and Maria, and Aunt Sarah, get the letters I wrote them last week? I got a letter from Uncle M. day before yesterday, saying that he did not like to ask any more[End Page 1] favors at the Sury? Gents, as he had been obliged to ask for a furlough for Sam. So that is all over. I am perfectly astounded as what you tell me of Henry Jervey. Do write immediately and tell me all about it. And only think, after reading your letter yesterday evening, I went over to the 1st Regt. to tell Pinckney Seabrook about it, and when I got there I met Eddie Stuart, who told me that he had just received a letter from Barnie, announcing his engagement of my two most intimate friends, on the same day. Two of our old trio. It made me feel sad for a while. I felt as if our old associations were being broken up. I have written to both of them this morning. Barnie is engaged to Miss Emma Lee of Camden. And from what I[End Page 2] know of him, I judge of her. I know that his requirements are most strict, as to the character of her who is to be the partner of his future wife. Yet though I see them all doing this, I cannot yet reallize [sic] how I can ever allow any other affection to equal that which I bear to the authors of my being, and the mother from whose anxious thoughts I have never been absent one single day since my birth. I am so glad that you enjoy yourself where you are. And as it is cheaper than keeping house, I hope that you will stay there as long as possible. I hardly think that I will be able to get home now before the end of the War, when I resign my commission. Do give my love to [Nam?], and tell him that I will write to her soon. Tell her she has given me such a glowing description her friend Bury, that I find my self quite falling in love with her. Ask Ella to write[End Page 3] ... [Note written at the top of page 2: There is no use to fret on two ten cent stamps, as the letters are forwarded from Richmond to the army. Always put 12th Regt. S.C.V. Gregg's Brigade.] ...to me too. And also [Movrie?]. You say that the others are in Charleston. I am sure I hope that it is a mistake, about Mr. [Parky?] Brown's wound. Tell me in your next how he is getting on. Do tell me all that you can learn about Miss Western. How old she is, and if she is well off in the world. We came up with our wagons yesterday for about an hour. I seized the opportunity, to take out my carpet bag, and went into the woods, and had a good wash, and changed my clothing. Uncle M. exaggerated my sickness, and I am now quite well again. Do try and find out if my [Filat?] Ruck letters were received. I am afraid that this is too late for the mail today, so that I will have to send it tomorrow. I feel actually gay today, in consequence of those letters. I write you you about twice a week now. Ask Papa to write. Your Own Affect. Son, W.[End Page 4] Soldiers Letter from W.W. Keith Asst. Surgeon 12th Regt. S.C.V. Mrs. P.T. Keith Anderson C.H. So. Ca. [End Page 5]
  • Image 01
    Bivouac near Orange C.H., August 15th 1862 My Dear Mama, I received your letter of the 5th day before yesterday. Also Nan's and Mimm's, for which thank them. I got yours of the 7th yesterday. I feel in better spirits today in consequence, than I have for a month past. I suppose that that is the effect also of the invaluable gift accompanying your last. Is it not strange? we seem to think together. I was intending only the day before to ask you in my next letter to send me your likeness. And lo and behold, it came, at the wish. All of your letters seem to come now, and they do cheer me up in my solitude. Poor Johny. He always was, and I am afraid always will be the most careless of mortals. I wrote to you day before yesterday, and to Johny, the day before that. Did Papa and Maria, and Aunt Sarah, get the letters I wrote them last week? I got a letter from Uncle M. day before yesterday, saying that he did not like to ask any more[End Page 1] favors at the Sury? Gents, as he had been obliged to ask for a furlough for Sam. So that is all over. I am perfectly astounded as what you tell me of Henry Jervey. Do write immediately and tell me all about it. And only think, after reading your letter yesterday evening, I went over to the 1st Regt. to tell Pinckney Seabrook about it, and when I got there I met Eddie Stuart, who told me that he had just received a letter from Barnie, announcing his engagement of my two most intimate friends, on the same day. Two of our old trio. It made me feel sad for a while. I felt as if our old associations were being broken up. I have written to both of them this morning. Barnie is engaged to Miss Emma Lee of Camden. And from what I[End Page 2] know of him, I judge of her. I know that his requirements are most strict, as to the character of her who is to be the partner of his future wife. Yet though I see them all doing this, I cannot yet reallize [sic] how I can ever allow any other affection to equal that which I bear to the authors of my being, and the mother from whose anxious thoughts I have never been absent one single day since my birth. I am so glad that you enjoy yourself where you are. And as it is cheaper than keeping house, I hope that you will stay there as long as possible. I hardly think that I will be able to get home now before the end of the War, when I resign my commission. Do give my love to [Nam?], and tell him that I will write to her soon. Tell her she has given me such a glowing description her friend Bury, that I find my self quite falling in love with her. Ask Ella to write[End Page 3] ... [Note written at the top of page 2: There is no use to fret on two ten cent stamps, as the letters are forwarded from Richmond to the army. Always put 12th Regt. S.C.V. Gregg's Brigade.] ...to me too. And also [Movrie?]. You say that the others are in Charleston. I am sure I hope that it is a mistake, about Mr. [Parky?] Brown's wound. Tell me in your next how he is getting on. Do tell me all that you can learn about Miss Western. How old she is, and if she is well off in the world. We came up with our wagons yesterday for about an hour. I seized the opportunity, to take out my carpet bag, and went into the woods, and had a good wash, and changed my clothing. Uncle M. exaggerated my sickness, and I am now quite well again. Do try and find out if my [Filat?] Ruck letters were received. I am afraid that this is too late for the mail today, so that I will have to send it tomorrow. I feel actually gay today, in consequence of those letters. I write you you about twice a week now. Ask Papa to write. Your Own Affect. Son, W.[End Page 4] Soldiers Letter from W.W. Keith Asst. Surgeon 12th Regt. S.C.V. Mrs. P.T. Keith Anderson C.H. So. Ca. [End Page 5]
  • Image 01
    Bivouac near Orange C.H., August 15th 1862 My Dear Mama, I received your letter of the 5th day before yesterday. Also Nan's and Mimm's, for which thank them. I got yours of the 7th yesterday. I feel in better spirits today in consequence, than I have for a month past. I suppose that that is the effect also of the invaluable gift accompanying your last. Is it not strange? we seem to think together. I was intending only the day before to ask you in my next letter to send me your likeness. And lo and behold, it came, at the wish. All of your letters seem to come now, and they do cheer me up in my solitude. Poor Johny. He always was, and I am afraid always will be the most careless of mortals. I wrote to you day before yesterday, and to Johny, the day before that. Did Papa and Maria, and Aunt Sarah, get the letters I wrote them last week? I got a letter from Uncle M. day before yesterday, saying that he did not like to ask any more[End Page 1] favors at the Sury? Gents, as he had been obliged to ask for a furlough for Sam. So that is all over. I am perfectly astounded as what you tell me of Henry Jervey. Do write immediately and tell me all about it. And only think, after reading your letter yesterday evening, I went over to the 1st Regt. to tell Pinckney Seabrook about it, and when I got there I met Eddie Stuart, who told me that he had just received a letter from Barnie, announcing his engagement of my two most intimate friends, on the same day. Two of our old trio. It made me feel sad for a while. I felt as if our old associations were being broken up. I have written to both of them this morning. Barnie is engaged to Miss Emma Lee of Camden. And from what I[End Page 2] know of him, I judge of her. I know that his requirements are most strict, as to the character of her who is to be the partner of his future wife. Yet though I see them all doing this, I cannot yet reallize [sic] how I can ever allow any other affection to equal that which I bear to the authors of my being, and the mother from whose anxious thoughts I have never been absent one single day since my birth. I am so glad that you enjoy yourself where you are. And as it is cheaper than keeping house, I hope that you will stay there as long as possible. I hardly think that I will be able to get home now before the end of the War, when I resign my commission. Do give my love to [Nam?], and tell him that I will write to her soon. Tell her she has given me such a glowing description her friend Bury, that I find my self quite falling in love with her. Ask Ella to write[End Page 3] ... [Note written at the top of page 2: There is no use to fret on two ten cent stamps, as the letters are forwarded from Richmond to the army. Always put 12th Regt. S.C.V. Gregg's Brigade.] ...to me too. And also [Movrie?]. You say that the others are in Charleston. I am sure I hope that it is a mistake, about Mr. [Parky?] Brown's wound. Tell me in your next how he is getting on. Do tell me all that you can learn about Miss Western. How old she is, and if she is well off in the world. We came up with our wagons yesterday for about an hour. I seized the opportunity, to take out my carpet bag, and went into the woods, and had a good wash, and changed my clothing. Uncle M. exaggerated my sickness, and I am now quite well again. Do try and find out if my [Filat?] Ruck letters were received. I am afraid that this is too late for the mail today, so that I will have to send it tomorrow. I feel actually gay today, in consequence of those letters. I write you you about twice a week now. Ask Papa to write. Your Own Affect. Son, W.[End Page 4] Soldiers Letter from W.W. Keith Asst. Surgeon 12th Regt. S.C.V. Mrs. P.T. Keith Anderson C.H. So. Ca. [End Page 5]
Title:
069. Willis Keith to Anna Bell Keith -- August 15, 1862
Creator:
Wilkinson and Keith Families
Date:
1862-08-15
Description:
Willis writes from near Orange, Virginia, on news from home, particularly engagements
Collection:
Wilkinson-Keith Family Papers
Contributing Institution:
College of Charleston Libraries
Media Type:
Manuscripts
Personal or Corporate Subject:
Confederate States of America. Army
Topical Subject:
Betrothal
Geographic Subject:
United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865
Shelving Locator:
Mss 0111
S.C. County:
Charleston County (S.C.)
Internet Media Type:
image/jpeg
Digitization Specifications:
600 ppi, 24-bit depth, color, Epson Expression 10000XL scanner, Archival Master is a tiff.
Copyright Status Statement:
Digital image copyright 2010, The College of Charleston Libraries. All rights reserved. For more information contact The College of Charleston Library, Charleston, SC 29424.