068. Willis Keith to Anna Bell Keith -- August 18, 1862

  • Image 01
    Bivouac near Rapidan, August 18th 1862 My Dear Mama, I wrote to you on the 15th. We have been on the march ever since, so that I have not received any letter. I told you in my last that I had received yours of the 5th and 7th, and Nan's and [Mimie's?]. I must hurry through as there is a chance of getting this back to Orange to the mail. We have been confidently expecting a great battle. Genl. Lee is with the army here, and Genl. Johnston. The men drew three days rations yesterday, so that they expect to fight today, or they expected it yesterday. I went yesterday to the top of a high hill from which I could see the camps of the enemy, about 5 miles off. But they have moved this morning, bag and baggage. So that after all [Pope's?] army skedaddles, at the mere sight of us. I do not know whether their move, will postpone the battle. I long to get the mail, so that I can see whether there is a letter for me. I went over both yesterday morning and afternoon[End Page 1] to Col. Hamilton's Regt. service. They have an Episcopal chaplain, and I heard the church service, for the first time in 5 months. Genl. [Perder?] came up, and several colonels, and we all knelt on the ground. I heard an admirable sermon from Mr. Williams, the chaplain, in the morning. Did Johny receive the letters I wrote him? What a horrible thing about Mr. Girardeaux. Have you heard what was the nature of his crime. I long to hear all about Henry Jervey's engagement, if it is true. I wrote to both him and Bonnie Stuart two days ago, congratulating them. Do write and tell me all about it. Tell me also what has been the upshot of Minnie Whaley's engagement. It is quite cool here this morning. The coldest day that we have had since the spring. I have a very disagreeable companion, in the [nettle?] Rash. I do not know what gave is to me. But at any rate it is a sort of protection against fevers,[End Page 2] so that you need not fear the [illegible] for me. I have not seen my tent now for two weeks and there is every probability that I will not again for some days. I will be glad when I can date my letters from camp again. I suppose you saw by the papers before you got my letter that Gregg's Brigade was not in the last battle, and so, did not feel very uneasy. But I must close, or I will lose my opportunity. Your present to me is you last was a very valuable one. I love to get off by myself, into the woods, and look at it. Do give my love to all. Did Papa get my letter? Your Own Affectionate Son, W. [End Page 3]
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    Bivouac near Rapidan, August 18th 1862 My Dear Mama, I wrote to you on the 15th. We have been on the march ever since, so that I have not received any letter. I told you in my last that I had received yours of the 5th and 7th, and Nan's and [Mimie's?]. I must hurry through as there is a chance of getting this back to Orange to the mail. We have been confidently expecting a great battle. Genl. Lee is with the army here, and Genl. Johnston. The men drew three days rations yesterday, so that they expect to fight today, or they expected it yesterday. I went yesterday to the top of a high hill from which I could see the camps of the enemy, about 5 miles off. But they have moved this morning, bag and baggage. So that after all [Pope's?] army skedaddles, at the mere sight of us. I do not know whether their move, will postpone the battle. I long to get the mail, so that I can see whether there is a letter for me. I went over both yesterday morning and afternoon[End Page 1] to Col. Hamilton's Regt. service. They have an Episcopal chaplain, and I heard the church service, for the first time in 5 months. Genl. [Perder?] came up, and several colonels, and we all knelt on the ground. I heard an admirable sermon from Mr. Williams, the chaplain, in the morning. Did Johny receive the letters I wrote him? What a horrible thing about Mr. Girardeaux. Have you heard what was the nature of his crime. I long to hear all about Henry Jervey's engagement, if it is true. I wrote to both him and Bonnie Stuart two days ago, congratulating them. Do write and tell me all about it. Tell me also what has been the upshot of Minnie Whaley's engagement. It is quite cool here this morning. The coldest day that we have had since the spring. I have a very disagreeable companion, in the [nettle?] Rash. I do not know what gave is to me. But at any rate it is a sort of protection against fevers,[End Page 2] so that you need not fear the [illegible] for me. I have not seen my tent now for two weeks and there is every probability that I will not again for some days. I will be glad when I can date my letters from camp again. I suppose you saw by the papers before you got my letter that Gregg's Brigade was not in the last battle, and so, did not feel very uneasy. But I must close, or I will lose my opportunity. Your present to me is you last was a very valuable one. I love to get off by myself, into the woods, and look at it. Do give my love to all. Did Papa get my letter? Your Own Affectionate Son, W. [End Page 3]
  • Image 01
    Bivouac near Rapidan, August 18th 1862 My Dear Mama, I wrote to you on the 15th. We have been on the march ever since, so that I have not received any letter. I told you in my last that I had received yours of the 5th and 7th, and Nan's and [Mimie's?]. I must hurry through as there is a chance of getting this back to Orange to the mail. We have been confidently expecting a great battle. Genl. Lee is with the army here, and Genl. Johnston. The men drew three days rations yesterday, so that they expect to fight today, or they expected it yesterday. I went yesterday to the top of a high hill from which I could see the camps of the enemy, about 5 miles off. But they have moved this morning, bag and baggage. So that after all [Pope's?] army skedaddles, at the mere sight of us. I do not know whether their move, will postpone the battle. I long to get the mail, so that I can see whether there is a letter for me. I went over both yesterday morning and afternoon[End Page 1] to Col. Hamilton's Regt. service. They have an Episcopal chaplain, and I heard the church service, for the first time in 5 months. Genl. [Perder?] came up, and several colonels, and we all knelt on the ground. I heard an admirable sermon from Mr. Williams, the chaplain, in the morning. Did Johny receive the letters I wrote him? What a horrible thing about Mr. Girardeaux. Have you heard what was the nature of his crime. I long to hear all about Henry Jervey's engagement, if it is true. I wrote to both him and Bonnie Stuart two days ago, congratulating them. Do write and tell me all about it. Tell me also what has been the upshot of Minnie Whaley's engagement. It is quite cool here this morning. The coldest day that we have had since the spring. I have a very disagreeable companion, in the [nettle?] Rash. I do not know what gave is to me. But at any rate it is a sort of protection against fevers,[End Page 2] so that you need not fear the [illegible] for me. I have not seen my tent now for two weeks and there is every probability that I will not again for some days. I will be glad when I can date my letters from camp again. I suppose you saw by the papers before you got my letter that Gregg's Brigade was not in the last battle, and so, did not feel very uneasy. But I must close, or I will lose my opportunity. Your present to me is you last was a very valuable one. I love to get off by myself, into the woods, and look at it. Do give my love to all. Did Papa get my letter? Your Own Affectionate Son, W. [End Page 3]
Title:
068. Willis Keith to Anna Bell Keith -- August 18, 1862
Creator:
Wilkinson and Keith Families
Date:
1862-08-18
Description:
Willis writes from near Ripadan, Virginia, where Generals Lee and Johnston are in command. He speculates on a potential attack by the Confederates, though Union General Pope has pulled his men back.
Collection:
Wilkinson-Keith Family Papers
Contributing Institution:
College of Charleston Libraries
Media Type:
Manuscripts
Personal or Corporate Subject:
Confederate States of America. Army, Lee, Robert E. (Robert Edward), 1807-1870, Johnston, Joseph E. (Joseph Eggleston), 1807-1891, Pope, John, 1822-1892
Geographic Subject:
United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865
Shelving Locator:
Mss 0111
S.C. County:
Charleston County (S.C.)
Internet Media Type:
image/jpeg
Digitization Specifications:
600 ppi, 24-bit depth, color, Epson Expression 10000XL scanner, Archival Master is a tiff.
Copyright Status Statement:
Digital image copyright 2010, The College of Charleston Libraries. All rights reserved. For more information contact The College of Charleston Library, Charleston, SC 29424.