063. Willis Keith to Anna Bell Keith -- July 28, 1862

  • Image 01
    Camp, July 28th 1862 My Dear Maddie, I have just received your letter, before breakfast this morning. And now, after breakfast I answer it. It was really a treat to me to receive it. It is the latest from home by a fortnight. Mama's the 13th was the last before it. You have told more than I have known all about you companions in Anderson. I hope that you have a pleasant time there. Are any of the girls pretty that you speak of as being there? The Busy Whaleys and the[End Page 1] Mary Belchers, and Betsy Millers? By the way, you had better not read this to them, for they might not like the liberty that I have taken with their names. So if you are reading it to them, take the advice that I here give you and stop before you get there. Also tell me how old they are. I have sent Paris in to Richmond this morning with a note to Uncle M. asking him to send him off home, for he has got so used up by camp life that he is not of much use to me in camp. I must try and hire a boy, but I am afraid that I shall have some trouble in finding one, and will[End Page 2] be very much embarassed in the mean time. We have just got orders to march, so that I am in a great hurry. I have a Yankee sword, which I got on Friday the 27th June. But I lost my own in consequence. For I gave it to one of my nurses to carry for me, and me was afterwards shot, and I never got back my own sword. But I have the other. I will write to you again soon when I am not so hurried. This curious looking sheet is a Yankee one. Has Mama got all the letters I wrote to her? I wrote one day before yesterday.[End Page 3] Do you give my love to all. Your affectionate brother, W. P.S. I open my letter a little later in the day to tell you that we have marched about five miles on our way to Richmond, where are to take the cars to go out to Western Virginia. I may not have another opportunity of writing for many days. I do not fancy the trip. I know that it will be one cataloge of hardships. I wish very much that I was quietly stationed at some Hospital. But I suppose that I am booked here for the war. Do all of you write to me oftener. Write very soon, and answer all the questions that I have asked. How did Henry [Jervey?] get off, up into the country. Love to all. Yours affectionately, W.W.K. [End Page 4]
  • Image 01
    Camp, July 28th 1862 My Dear Maddie, I have just received your letter, before breakfast this morning. And now, after breakfast I answer it. It was really a treat to me to receive it. It is the latest from home by a fortnight. Mama's the 13th was the last before it. You have told more than I have known all about you companions in Anderson. I hope that you have a pleasant time there. Are any of the girls pretty that you speak of as being there? The Busy Whaleys and the[End Page 1] Mary Belchers, and Betsy Millers? By the way, you had better not read this to them, for they might not like the liberty that I have taken with their names. So if you are reading it to them, take the advice that I here give you and stop before you get there. Also tell me how old they are. I have sent Paris in to Richmond this morning with a note to Uncle M. asking him to send him off home, for he has got so used up by camp life that he is not of much use to me in camp. I must try and hire a boy, but I am afraid that I shall have some trouble in finding one, and will[End Page 2] be very much embarassed in the mean time. We have just got orders to march, so that I am in a great hurry. I have a Yankee sword, which I got on Friday the 27th June. But I lost my own in consequence. For I gave it to one of my nurses to carry for me, and me was afterwards shot, and I never got back my own sword. But I have the other. I will write to you again soon when I am not so hurried. This curious looking sheet is a Yankee one. Has Mama got all the letters I wrote to her? I wrote one day before yesterday.[End Page 3] Do you give my love to all. Your affectionate brother, W. P.S. I open my letter a little later in the day to tell you that we have marched about five miles on our way to Richmond, where are to take the cars to go out to Western Virginia. I may not have another opportunity of writing for many days. I do not fancy the trip. I know that it will be one cataloge of hardships. I wish very much that I was quietly stationed at some Hospital. But I suppose that I am booked here for the war. Do all of you write to me oftener. Write very soon, and answer all the questions that I have asked. How did Henry [Jervey?] get off, up into the country. Love to all. Yours affectionately, W.W.K. [End Page 4]
  • Image 01
    Camp, July 28th 1862 My Dear Maddie, I have just received your letter, before breakfast this morning. And now, after breakfast I answer it. It was really a treat to me to receive it. It is the latest from home by a fortnight. Mama's the 13th was the last before it. You have told more than I have known all about you companions in Anderson. I hope that you have a pleasant time there. Are any of the girls pretty that you speak of as being there? The Busy Whaleys and the[End Page 1] Mary Belchers, and Betsy Millers? By the way, you had better not read this to them, for they might not like the liberty that I have taken with their names. So if you are reading it to them, take the advice that I here give you and stop before you get there. Also tell me how old they are. I have sent Paris in to Richmond this morning with a note to Uncle M. asking him to send him off home, for he has got so used up by camp life that he is not of much use to me in camp. I must try and hire a boy, but I am afraid that I shall have some trouble in finding one, and will[End Page 2] be very much embarassed in the mean time. We have just got orders to march, so that I am in a great hurry. I have a Yankee sword, which I got on Friday the 27th June. But I lost my own in consequence. For I gave it to one of my nurses to carry for me, and me was afterwards shot, and I never got back my own sword. But I have the other. I will write to you again soon when I am not so hurried. This curious looking sheet is a Yankee one. Has Mama got all the letters I wrote to her? I wrote one day before yesterday.[End Page 3] Do you give my love to all. Your affectionate brother, W. P.S. I open my letter a little later in the day to tell you that we have marched about five miles on our way to Richmond, where are to take the cars to go out to Western Virginia. I may not have another opportunity of writing for many days. I do not fancy the trip. I know that it will be one cataloge of hardships. I wish very much that I was quietly stationed at some Hospital. But I suppose that I am booked here for the war. Do all of you write to me oftener. Write very soon, and answer all the questions that I have asked. How did Henry [Jervey?] get off, up into the country. Love to all. Yours affectionately, W.W.K. [End Page 4]
  • Image 01
    Camp, July 28th 1862 My Dear Maddie, I have just received your letter, before breakfast this morning. And now, after breakfast I answer it. It was really a treat to me to receive it. It is the latest from home by a fortnight. Mama's the 13th was the last before it. You have told more than I have known all about you companions in Anderson. I hope that you have a pleasant time there. Are any of the girls pretty that you speak of as being there? The Busy Whaleys and the[End Page 1] Mary Belchers, and Betsy Millers? By the way, you had better not read this to them, for they might not like the liberty that I have taken with their names. So if you are reading it to them, take the advice that I here give you and stop before you get there. Also tell me how old they are. I have sent Paris in to Richmond this morning with a note to Uncle M. asking him to send him off home, for he has got so used up by camp life that he is not of much use to me in camp. I must try and hire a boy, but I am afraid that I shall have some trouble in finding one, and will[End Page 2] be very much embarassed in the mean time. We have just got orders to march, so that I am in a great hurry. I have a Yankee sword, which I got on Friday the 27th June. But I lost my own in consequence. For I gave it to one of my nurses to carry for me, and me was afterwards shot, and I never got back my own sword. But I have the other. I will write to you again soon when I am not so hurried. This curious looking sheet is a Yankee one. Has Mama got all the letters I wrote to her? I wrote one day before yesterday.[End Page 3] Do you give my love to all. Your affectionate brother, W. P.S. I open my letter a little later in the day to tell you that we have marched about five miles on our way to Richmond, where are to take the cars to go out to Western Virginia. I may not have another opportunity of writing for many days. I do not fancy the trip. I know that it will be one cataloge of hardships. I wish very much that I was quietly stationed at some Hospital. But I suppose that I am booked here for the war. Do all of you write to me oftener. Write very soon, and answer all the questions that I have asked. How did Henry [Jervey?] get off, up into the country. Love to all. Yours affectionately, W.W.K. [End Page 4]
Title:
063. Willis Keith to Anna Bell Keith -- July 28, 1862
Creator:
Wilkinson and Keith Families
Date:
1862-07-28
Description:
Willis writes from camp outside Richmond, that he is marching to western Virginia. He has sent his slave, Paris home and is in search of another "boy".
Collection:
Wilkinson-Keith Family Papers
Contributing Institution:
College of Charleston Libraries
Media Type:
Manuscripts
Personal or Corporate Subject:
Confederate States of America. Army
Topical Subject:
Slaves
Geographic Subject:
United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865, Richmond (Va.)
Shelving Locator:
Mss 0111
S.C. County:
Charleston County (S.C.)
Internet Media Type:
image/jpeg
Digitization Specifications:
600 ppi, 24-bit depth, color, Epson Expression 10000XL scanner, Archival Master is a tiff.
Copyright Status Statement:
Digital image copyright 2010, The College of Charleston Libraries. All rights reserved. For more information contact The College of Charleston Library, Charleston, SC 29424.