029. Virginia Wilkinson Belin to Eleanora Wilkinson -- July 5, 1847

  • Image 01
    Charleston Monday July 5th 1847 I come, my Dearest Mamma, to acknowledge the receipt of your most welcome letter, and to return you many thanks for it--it was indeed an unexpected pleasure, for I had not flattered myself with the idea of so soon hearing from you, knowing your dislike to your pen--so you see I take it as a great favour, and value it accordingly--I was glad to hear you had a comfortable time up and feel comfortably settled--Thank you for the delightful plate of fresh butter which Stanna sent me Friday morning--also the jar of jelly which is very nice--Hess and [Ginny/Jinny] were perfectly delighted with it, as sent to them by Grandmamma--Hess said it was very kind in you to send it all the way down here to her. She is now by me, and sends her love to you and Papa and says she would be very glad to see you--I'm sure she would, too she always has seemed fond of you. She is now amusing herself with a letter she says she is writing Grandpapa--today--well what delightfully cool weather we have been having? You must not attribute it Orangeburg though--the change occurred soon after you left. The contrast was great, for the day or two before you left was extremely warm--But this is a very dismal day for the celebration of the 4th--dark and rainy--Stanna invited me[End Page 1] to carry Hess and Ginger to partake of an elegant iced-cake(Milred's make) and iced-cream in honor of Johnny's birth-day. By the bye 'tis Williams too, I suppose you have remembered it--May he have many happy returns of it--I passed the other morning with Stanna, carried Hess, who was much pleased with the children and their playthings--we paid a visit at Uncle Withers' the other evening--found him quiet--not restless as he is sometimes, but when he spoke quite wandering--Elizabeth and the Dr. go about the middle of next month--she carries only Jane for her two babies--I think will have more work that play--I do not envy her--Stanna I believe wrote you the other day so I suppose she told you the contents of Jane's last letter to her. I intent writing her to-morrow--it seems from what she says that they have had warmer weather in Norfolk than we have had here. But I do not understand why they should not have sea-breeze there--their house must have been a very warm one--one hopes the new one will be cooler--Well, Mamma, I think the Miss [Knights?] must have been pleased with their pretty presents! and the jars with the nice confectionary! Have you seen them yet? I sent word to Stanna about sending Thursday for the week--I am afraid the rain will ruin the cotton crop--Stanna told you about the yd of muslin? She will get it at last, so it is well you secured it--after all, mamma, you went off without the scales and weights! Would you like them sent up?[End Page 2] I did not think of them but I saw them in the pantry after you had left. I regretted it--Did you forget anything else? one of the worst things about a move--They got a letter from Mrs [Shubrick?] the other day--she had reached the warm springs, said there was not much company there, but that they managed to pass their time very pleasantly--I so sincerely wish Jane was one of their party--Well, Mamma I suppose you occupy yourself as usual with work, reading and looking after matters--and Papa, I suppose, amuses himself with reading when tis too warm for outdoor business--he has been truly fortunate in escaping fever so far, for he has certainly run great risks--I only hope it may continue--Well, my Dear Mamma, I do dislike to send you so wretchedly dull a letter, but I hope the next time I may have a little more to write about--I have written this time especially to thank you for your kind letter and hope that whenever it suits you, you will favour me with another--Mr B joins me in love to yrself & Papa. with the most affectionate love to you both, I remain yr truly affec Daughter, V. W. Belin-- I heard of the death of poor [Mr/Wm] Burns. Williams old teacher you know--he sold out his establishment here and returned home it seems just in time to die--consumption you know--I had the garret put to rights the other day, and have made it Beck's [illegible] every morning to attend to the rooms which are open--I had your stair-case carpets opened and shook the other day with mine--[in pencil] all well at Mimmys[End Page 3] Peggy says she feels quite well again. Mrs. Willis Wilkinson Care of Dr. W. Wilkinson Orangeburg So Carolina [End Page 4]
  • Image 01
    Charleston Monday July 5th 1847 I come, my Dearest Mamma, to acknowledge the receipt of your most welcome letter, and to return you many thanks for it--it was indeed an unexpected pleasure, for I had not flattered myself with the idea of so soon hearing from you, knowing your dislike to your pen--so you see I take it as a great favour, and value it accordingly--I was glad to hear you had a comfortable time up and feel comfortably settled--Thank you for the delightful plate of fresh butter which Stanna sent me Friday morning--also the jar of jelly which is very nice--Hess and [Ginny/Jinny] were perfectly delighted with it, as sent to them by Grandmamma--Hess said it was very kind in you to send it all the way down here to her. She is now by me, and sends her love to you and Papa and says she would be very glad to see you--I'm sure she would, too she always has seemed fond of you. She is now amusing herself with a letter she says she is writing Grandpapa--today--well what delightfully cool weather we have been having? You must not attribute it Orangeburg though--the change occurred soon after you left. The contrast was great, for the day or two before you left was extremely warm--But this is a very dismal day for the celebration of the 4th--dark and rainy--Stanna invited me[End Page 1] to carry Hess and Ginger to partake of an elegant iced-cake(Milred's make) and iced-cream in honor of Johnny's birth-day. By the bye 'tis Williams too, I suppose you have remembered it--May he have many happy returns of it--I passed the other morning with Stanna, carried Hess, who was much pleased with the children and their playthings--we paid a visit at Uncle Withers' the other evening--found him quiet--not restless as he is sometimes, but when he spoke quite wandering--Elizabeth and the Dr. go about the middle of next month--she carries only Jane for her two babies--I think will have more work that play--I do not envy her--Stanna I believe wrote you the other day so I suppose she told you the contents of Jane's last letter to her. I intent writing her to-morrow--it seems from what she says that they have had warmer weather in Norfolk than we have had here. But I do not understand why they should not have sea-breeze there--their house must have been a very warm one--one hopes the new one will be cooler--Well, Mamma, I think the Miss [Knights?] must have been pleased with their pretty presents! and the jars with the nice confectionary! Have you seen them yet? I sent word to Stanna about sending Thursday for the week--I am afraid the rain will ruin the cotton crop--Stanna told you about the yd of muslin? She will get it at last, so it is well you secured it--after all, mamma, you went off without the scales and weights! Would you like them sent up?[End Page 2] I did not think of them but I saw them in the pantry after you had left. I regretted it--Did you forget anything else? one of the worst things about a move--They got a letter from Mrs [Shubrick?] the other day--she had reached the warm springs, said there was not much company there, but that they managed to pass their time very pleasantly--I so sincerely wish Jane was one of their party--Well, Mamma I suppose you occupy yourself as usual with work, reading and looking after matters--and Papa, I suppose, amuses himself with reading when tis too warm for outdoor business--he has been truly fortunate in escaping fever so far, for he has certainly run great risks--I only hope it may continue--Well, my Dear Mamma, I do dislike to send you so wretchedly dull a letter, but I hope the next time I may have a little more to write about--I have written this time especially to thank you for your kind letter and hope that whenever it suits you, you will favour me with another--Mr B joins me in love to yrself & Papa. with the most affectionate love to you both, I remain yr truly affec Daughter, V. W. Belin-- I heard of the death of poor [Mr/Wm] Burns. Williams old teacher you know--he sold out his establishment here and returned home it seems just in time to die--consumption you know--I had the garret put to rights the other day, and have made it Beck's [illegible] every morning to attend to the rooms which are open--I had your stair-case carpets opened and shook the other day with mine--[in pencil] all well at Mimmys[End Page 3] Peggy says she feels quite well again. Mrs. Willis Wilkinson Care of Dr. W. Wilkinson Orangeburg So Carolina [End Page 4]
  • Image 01
    Charleston Monday July 5th 1847 I come, my Dearest Mamma, to acknowledge the receipt of your most welcome letter, and to return you many thanks for it--it was indeed an unexpected pleasure, for I had not flattered myself with the idea of so soon hearing from you, knowing your dislike to your pen--so you see I take it as a great favour, and value it accordingly--I was glad to hear you had a comfortable time up and feel comfortably settled--Thank you for the delightful plate of fresh butter which Stanna sent me Friday morning--also the jar of jelly which is very nice--Hess and [Ginny/Jinny] were perfectly delighted with it, as sent to them by Grandmamma--Hess said it was very kind in you to send it all the way down here to her. She is now by me, and sends her love to you and Papa and says she would be very glad to see you--I'm sure she would, too she always has seemed fond of you. She is now amusing herself with a letter she says she is writing Grandpapa--today--well what delightfully cool weather we have been having? You must not attribute it Orangeburg though--the change occurred soon after you left. The contrast was great, for the day or two before you left was extremely warm--But this is a very dismal day for the celebration of the 4th--dark and rainy--Stanna invited me[End Page 1] to carry Hess and Ginger to partake of an elegant iced-cake(Milred's make) and iced-cream in honor of Johnny's birth-day. By the bye 'tis Williams too, I suppose you have remembered it--May he have many happy returns of it--I passed the other morning with Stanna, carried Hess, who was much pleased with the children and their playthings--we paid a visit at Uncle Withers' the other evening--found him quiet--not restless as he is sometimes, but when he spoke quite wandering--Elizabeth and the Dr. go about the middle of next month--she carries only Jane for her two babies--I think will have more work that play--I do not envy her--Stanna I believe wrote you the other day so I suppose she told you the contents of Jane's last letter to her. I intent writing her to-morrow--it seems from what she says that they have had warmer weather in Norfolk than we have had here. But I do not understand why they should not have sea-breeze there--their house must have been a very warm one--one hopes the new one will be cooler--Well, Mamma, I think the Miss [Knights?] must have been pleased with their pretty presents! and the jars with the nice confectionary! Have you seen them yet? I sent word to Stanna about sending Thursday for the week--I am afraid the rain will ruin the cotton crop--Stanna told you about the yd of muslin? She will get it at last, so it is well you secured it--after all, mamma, you went off without the scales and weights! Would you like them sent up?[End Page 2] I did not think of them but I saw them in the pantry after you had left. I regretted it--Did you forget anything else? one of the worst things about a move--They got a letter from Mrs [Shubrick?] the other day--she had reached the warm springs, said there was not much company there, but that they managed to pass their time very pleasantly--I so sincerely wish Jane was one of their party--Well, Mamma I suppose you occupy yourself as usual with work, reading and looking after matters--and Papa, I suppose, amuses himself with reading when tis too warm for outdoor business--he has been truly fortunate in escaping fever so far, for he has certainly run great risks--I only hope it may continue--Well, my Dear Mamma, I do dislike to send you so wretchedly dull a letter, but I hope the next time I may have a little more to write about--I have written this time especially to thank you for your kind letter and hope that whenever it suits you, you will favour me with another--Mr B joins me in love to yrself & Papa. with the most affectionate love to you both, I remain yr truly affec Daughter, V. W. Belin-- I heard of the death of poor [Mr/Wm] Burns. Williams old teacher you know--he sold out his establishment here and returned home it seems just in time to die--consumption you know--I had the garret put to rights the other day, and have made it Beck's [illegible] every morning to attend to the rooms which are open--I had your stair-case carpets opened and shook the other day with mine--[in pencil] all well at Mimmys[End Page 3] Peggy says she feels quite well again. Mrs. Willis Wilkinson Care of Dr. W. Wilkinson Orangeburg So Carolina [End Page 4]
  • Image 01
    Charleston Monday July 5th 1847 I come, my Dearest Mamma, to acknowledge the receipt of your most welcome letter, and to return you many thanks for it--it was indeed an unexpected pleasure, for I had not flattered myself with the idea of so soon hearing from you, knowing your dislike to your pen--so you see I take it as a great favour, and value it accordingly--I was glad to hear you had a comfortable time up and feel comfortably settled--Thank you for the delightful plate of fresh butter which Stanna sent me Friday morning--also the jar of jelly which is very nice--Hess and [Ginny/Jinny] were perfectly delighted with it, as sent to them by Grandmamma--Hess said it was very kind in you to send it all the way down here to her. She is now by me, and sends her love to you and Papa and says she would be very glad to see you--I'm sure she would, too she always has seemed fond of you. She is now amusing herself with a letter she says she is writing Grandpapa--today--well what delightfully cool weather we have been having? You must not attribute it Orangeburg though--the change occurred soon after you left. The contrast was great, for the day or two before you left was extremely warm--But this is a very dismal day for the celebration of the 4th--dark and rainy--Stanna invited me[End Page 1] to carry Hess and Ginger to partake of an elegant iced-cake(Milred's make) and iced-cream in honor of Johnny's birth-day. By the bye 'tis Williams too, I suppose you have remembered it--May he have many happy returns of it--I passed the other morning with Stanna, carried Hess, who was much pleased with the children and their playthings--we paid a visit at Uncle Withers' the other evening--found him quiet--not restless as he is sometimes, but when he spoke quite wandering--Elizabeth and the Dr. go about the middle of next month--she carries only Jane for her two babies--I think will have more work that play--I do not envy her--Stanna I believe wrote you the other day so I suppose she told you the contents of Jane's last letter to her. I intent writing her to-morrow--it seems from what she says that they have had warmer weather in Norfolk than we have had here. But I do not understand why they should not have sea-breeze there--their house must have been a very warm one--one hopes the new one will be cooler--Well, Mamma, I think the Miss [Knights?] must have been pleased with their pretty presents! and the jars with the nice confectionary! Have you seen them yet? I sent word to Stanna about sending Thursday for the week--I am afraid the rain will ruin the cotton crop--Stanna told you about the yd of muslin? She will get it at last, so it is well you secured it--after all, mamma, you went off without the scales and weights! Would you like them sent up?[End Page 2] I did not think of them but I saw them in the pantry after you had left. I regretted it--Did you forget anything else? one of the worst things about a move--They got a letter from Mrs [Shubrick?] the other day--she had reached the warm springs, said there was not much company there, but that they managed to pass their time very pleasantly--I so sincerely wish Jane was one of their party--Well, Mamma I suppose you occupy yourself as usual with work, reading and looking after matters--and Papa, I suppose, amuses himself with reading when tis too warm for outdoor business--he has been truly fortunate in escaping fever so far, for he has certainly run great risks--I only hope it may continue--Well, my Dear Mamma, I do dislike to send you so wretchedly dull a letter, but I hope the next time I may have a little more to write about--I have written this time especially to thank you for your kind letter and hope that whenever it suits you, you will favour me with another--Mr B joins me in love to yrself & Papa. with the most affectionate love to you both, I remain yr truly affec Daughter, V. W. Belin-- I heard of the death of poor [Mr/Wm] Burns. Williams old teacher you know--he sold out his establishment here and returned home it seems just in time to die--consumption you know--I had the garret put to rights the other day, and have made it Beck's [illegible] every morning to attend to the rooms which are open--I had your stair-case carpets opened and shook the other day with mine--[in pencil] all well at Mimmys[End Page 3] Peggy says she feels quite well again. Mrs. Willis Wilkinson Care of Dr. W. Wilkinson Orangeburg So Carolina [End Page 4]
Title:
029. Virginia Wilkinson Belin to Eleanora Wilkinson -- July 5, 1847
Creator:
Wilkinson and Keith Families
Date:
1847-07-05
Description:
Letter from Virginia Wilkinson Belin to her mother. She talks of taking her daughters, Hess and Ginger (Jinny), to their cousin Johnny's birthday party, where there was iced cream and cake.
Collection:
Wilkinson-Keith Family Papers
Contributing Institution:
College of Charleston Libraries
Media Type:
Manuscripts
Topical Subject:
Children, Ice cream, ices, etc., Birthdays
Geographic Subject:
Charleston (S.C.)
Shelving Locator:
Mss 0111
S.C. County:
Charleston County (S.C.)
Internet Media Type:
image/jpeg
Digitization Specifications:
600 ppi, 24-bit depth, color, Epson Expression 10000XL scanner, Archival Master is a tiff.
Copyright Status Statement:
Digital image copyright 2010, The College of Charleston Libraries. All rights reserved. For more information contact The College of Charleston Library, Charleston, SC 29424.