354. Sue M. Monroe to Nellie [B. Clarksall?] -- October 12, 1898

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    Home October 12th 1898 Dear Nellie, I received your letter late yesterday afternoon. I looked over the list of names of S. C. soldiers but N. H. is not in the list The other name I make it Munro, as it is not so plain If so the board was marked J Munro, 2nd S. C. Vol. I know perfectly well where the grave was, both men were killed by a piece of shell Their regt. had been relieved by another and these two soldier were together and as they thought far enough in the rear to be out of danger. Young Munro, was a son of Judge Munro, of Anderson C. H. S. C. and his parents were coming here and have his remains taken up, but after the fuss was raised and men were employed that cared only for their pay, they were taken up although I begged [End Page 1] the man to leave that grave alone, as the parents had asked. He promised faithfully to do so, but went right straight and opened it and took both bodies up. As soon as I heard it had been done I went to see if it was really so and saw it was. I then wrote to Mrs Munro and told her of the dastardly trick. Mrs Munro, told me how both were killed and how buried. I copied all names just as I found them on the head bords and were the Yankee's had destroyed the board wrote the number of graves, no names or unknown. There were a good many head boards destroyed by the Yankees as soon as they came back up here. They seemed to have a particular spite at S. C. troops and those that had a few of the soldiers taken up were no better than Yankees. They traded with the Yanks and some took the oath Were traitors to the South in every way and because I insisted on burying the Soldiers as it ought to have been done and allowing no one to make it a money making scheme they took every thing in their own hands [End Page 2] and did nothing. The so called cemetery has been a pasture for years. I have never been it it but have seen it as I passed along the road, There is one lone stone. If I could see you I could give you all the particulars. It would have been a thousand times better to have left them where their comrade buried them, for they were buried so deep that nothing could disturb them I certainly am sorry to have to tell you this, if that is the grave, but if not the board she speaks of was destroyed and the grave is one with no name. My blood boils when I think of it. I hope to live to see the day when every traitor will be brought out in their true colors. I certainly am sorry for your friend the S.C. buried in the Church yard are Capt [illegible] Seabrook and Dulany. Adamson iron fence runs over part of one or two graves. The grave at the foot of Col Wilkerson, is a Georgian and I wish I could get a head stone to it. If the Munro's had said take them to Hay market. I would have done my best to have done so but they wanted [End Page 3] to come and see it done and the grave ought have been let alone but greed was at the bottom of it. Mrs. Gray wrote and mailed a letter to me the day before Mrs Kent, died I saw the death in the S. Churchman. I answered Mrs G. letter afterwards but have not heard from her since They expected to be in Washington, during the convention and paying us a visit I often think of you all and wish I could see you but if I had a thousand horses I can not leave home as long as the vile creatures are in the house back of me I am rather out of reading matter and wish I had something to pick up in odd moments or when I am resting I wanted to go to the convention but it would cost me so much that I could not afford it. I would had to board all the time as I have no friends or relations living in the City. Pleas try and come down if it is just a little while Sunday evening. I hope the Dr. subscribed for the veteran and will contribute war history. It is never any trouble to do a kind act for a Southern soldier or their loved ones. Your friend Sue M. Monroe Wellington. [End Page 4]
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    Home October 12th 1898 Dear Nellie, I received your letter late yesterday afternoon. I looked over the list of names of S. C. soldiers but N. H. is not in the list The other name I make it Munro, as it is not so plain If so the board was marked J Munro, 2nd S. C. Vol. I know perfectly well where the grave was, both men were killed by a piece of shell Their regt. had been relieved by another and these two soldier were together and as they thought far enough in the rear to be out of danger. Young Munro, was a son of Judge Munro, of Anderson C. H. S. C. and his parents were coming here and have his remains taken up, but after the fuss was raised and men were employed that cared only for their pay, they were taken up although I begged [End Page 1] the man to leave that grave alone, as the parents had asked. He promised faithfully to do so, but went right straight and opened it and took both bodies up. As soon as I heard it had been done I went to see if it was really so and saw it was. I then wrote to Mrs Munro and told her of the dastardly trick. Mrs Munro, told me how both were killed and how buried. I copied all names just as I found them on the head bords and were the Yankee's had destroyed the board wrote the number of graves, no names or unknown. There were a good many head boards destroyed by the Yankees as soon as they came back up here. They seemed to have a particular spite at S. C. troops and those that had a few of the soldiers taken up were no better than Yankees. They traded with the Yanks and some took the oath Were traitors to the South in every way and because I insisted on burying the Soldiers as it ought to have been done and allowing no one to make it a money making scheme they took every thing in their own hands [End Page 2] and did nothing. The so called cemetery has been a pasture for years. I have never been it it but have seen it as I passed along the road, There is one lone stone. If I could see you I could give you all the particulars. It would have been a thousand times better to have left them where their comrade buried them, for they were buried so deep that nothing could disturb them I certainly am sorry to have to tell you this, if that is the grave, but if not the board she speaks of was destroyed and the grave is one with no name. My blood boils when I think of it. I hope to live to see the day when every traitor will be brought out in their true colors. I certainly am sorry for your friend the S.C. buried in the Church yard are Capt [illegible] Seabrook and Dulany. Adamson iron fence runs over part of one or two graves. The grave at the foot of Col Wilkerson, is a Georgian and I wish I could get a head stone to it. If the Munro's had said take them to Hay market. I would have done my best to have done so but they wanted [End Page 3] to come and see it done and the grave ought have been let alone but greed was at the bottom of it. Mrs. Gray wrote and mailed a letter to me the day before Mrs Kent, died I saw the death in the S. Churchman. I answered Mrs G. letter afterwards but have not heard from her since They expected to be in Washington, during the convention and paying us a visit I often think of you all and wish I could see you but if I had a thousand horses I can not leave home as long as the vile creatures are in the house back of me I am rather out of reading matter and wish I had something to pick up in odd moments or when I am resting I wanted to go to the convention but it would cost me so much that I could not afford it. I would had to board all the time as I have no friends or relations living in the City. Pleas try and come down if it is just a little while Sunday evening. I hope the Dr. subscribed for the veteran and will contribute war history. It is never any trouble to do a kind act for a Southern soldier or their loved ones. Your friend Sue M. Monroe Wellington. [End Page 4]
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    Home October 12th 1898 Dear Nellie, I received your letter late yesterday afternoon. I looked over the list of names of S. C. soldiers but N. H. is not in the list The other name I make it Munro, as it is not so plain If so the board was marked J Munro, 2nd S. C. Vol. I know perfectly well where the grave was, both men were killed by a piece of shell Their regt. had been relieved by another and these two soldier were together and as they thought far enough in the rear to be out of danger. Young Munro, was a son of Judge Munro, of Anderson C. H. S. C. and his parents were coming here and have his remains taken up, but after the fuss was raised and men were employed that cared only for their pay, they were taken up although I begged [End Page 1] the man to leave that grave alone, as the parents had asked. He promised faithfully to do so, but went right straight and opened it and took both bodies up. As soon as I heard it had been done I went to see if it was really so and saw it was. I then wrote to Mrs Munro and told her of the dastardly trick. Mrs Munro, told me how both were killed and how buried. I copied all names just as I found them on the head bords and were the Yankee's had destroyed the board wrote the number of graves, no names or unknown. There were a good many head boards destroyed by the Yankees as soon as they came back up here. They seemed to have a particular spite at S. C. troops and those that had a few of the soldiers taken up were no better than Yankees. They traded with the Yanks and some took the oath Were traitors to the South in every way and because I insisted on burying the Soldiers as it ought to have been done and allowing no one to make it a money making scheme they took every thing in their own hands [End Page 2] and did nothing. The so called cemetery has been a pasture for years. I have never been it it but have seen it as I passed along the road, There is one lone stone. If I could see you I could give you all the particulars. It would have been a thousand times better to have left them where their comrade buried them, for they were buried so deep that nothing could disturb them I certainly am sorry to have to tell you this, if that is the grave, but if not the board she speaks of was destroyed and the grave is one with no name. My blood boils when I think of it. I hope to live to see the day when every traitor will be brought out in their true colors. I certainly am sorry for your friend the S.C. buried in the Church yard are Capt [illegible] Seabrook and Dulany. Adamson iron fence runs over part of one or two graves. The grave at the foot of Col Wilkerson, is a Georgian and I wish I could get a head stone to it. If the Munro's had said take them to Hay market. I would have done my best to have done so but they wanted [End Page 3] to come and see it done and the grave ought have been let alone but greed was at the bottom of it. Mrs. Gray wrote and mailed a letter to me the day before Mrs Kent, died I saw the death in the S. Churchman. I answered Mrs G. letter afterwards but have not heard from her since They expected to be in Washington, during the convention and paying us a visit I often think of you all and wish I could see you but if I had a thousand horses I can not leave home as long as the vile creatures are in the house back of me I am rather out of reading matter and wish I had something to pick up in odd moments or when I am resting I wanted to go to the convention but it would cost me so much that I could not afford it. I would had to board all the time as I have no friends or relations living in the City. Pleas try and come down if it is just a little while Sunday evening. I hope the Dr. subscribed for the veteran and will contribute war history. It is never any trouble to do a kind act for a Southern soldier or their loved ones. Your friend Sue M. Monroe Wellington. [End Page 4]
  • Image 01
    Home October 12th 1898 Dear Nellie, I received your letter late yesterday afternoon. I looked over the list of names of S. C. soldiers but N. H. is not in the list The other name I make it Munro, as it is not so plain If so the board was marked J Munro, 2nd S. C. Vol. I know perfectly well where the grave was, both men were killed by a piece of shell Their regt. had been relieved by another and these two soldier were together and as they thought far enough in the rear to be out of danger. Young Munro, was a son of Judge Munro, of Anderson C. H. S. C. and his parents were coming here and have his remains taken up, but after the fuss was raised and men were employed that cared only for their pay, they were taken up although I begged [End Page 1] the man to leave that grave alone, as the parents had asked. He promised faithfully to do so, but went right straight and opened it and took both bodies up. As soon as I heard it had been done I went to see if it was really so and saw it was. I then wrote to Mrs Munro and told her of the dastardly trick. Mrs Munro, told me how both were killed and how buried. I copied all names just as I found them on the head bords and were the Yankee's had destroyed the board wrote the number of graves, no names or unknown. There were a good many head boards destroyed by the Yankees as soon as they came back up here. They seemed to have a particular spite at S. C. troops and those that had a few of the soldiers taken up were no better than Yankees. They traded with the Yanks and some took the oath Were traitors to the South in every way and because I insisted on burying the Soldiers as it ought to have been done and allowing no one to make it a money making scheme they took every thing in their own hands [End Page 2] and did nothing. The so called cemetery has been a pasture for years. I have never been it it but have seen it as I passed along the road, There is one lone stone. If I could see you I could give you all the particulars. It would have been a thousand times better to have left them where their comrade buried them, for they were buried so deep that nothing could disturb them I certainly am sorry to have to tell you this, if that is the grave, but if not the board she speaks of was destroyed and the grave is one with no name. My blood boils when I think of it. I hope to live to see the day when every traitor will be brought out in their true colors. I certainly am sorry for your friend the S.C. buried in the Church yard are Capt [illegible] Seabrook and Dulany. Adamson iron fence runs over part of one or two graves. The grave at the foot of Col Wilkerson, is a Georgian and I wish I could get a head stone to it. If the Munro's had said take them to Hay market. I would have done my best to have done so but they wanted [End Page 3] to come and see it done and the grave ought have been let alone but greed was at the bottom of it. Mrs. Gray wrote and mailed a letter to me the day before Mrs Kent, died I saw the death in the S. Churchman. I answered Mrs G. letter afterwards but have not heard from her since They expected to be in Washington, during the convention and paying us a visit I often think of you all and wish I could see you but if I had a thousand horses I can not leave home as long as the vile creatures are in the house back of me I am rather out of reading matter and wish I had something to pick up in odd moments or when I am resting I wanted to go to the convention but it would cost me so much that I could not afford it. I would had to board all the time as I have no friends or relations living in the City. Pleas try and come down if it is just a little while Sunday evening. I hope the Dr. subscribed for the veteran and will contribute war history. It is never any trouble to do a kind act for a Southern soldier or their loved ones. Your friend Sue M. Monroe Wellington. [End Page 4]
Title:
354. Sue M. Monroe to Nellie [B. Clarksall?] -- October 12, 1898
Creator:
Heyward and Ferguson families, 1806-1923
Date:
1898-10-12
Description:
Letter from Sue M. Monroe to Nellie [B. Clarksall?] concerning the body of Nathaniel Heyward (II), who was killed in the Second Battle of Bull Run, August 1862. Monroe apparently tried to catalog and care for the graves of those buried on the battlefield at Manassas. 4p. October 12, 1898.
Collection:
Heyward and Ferguson Family Papers, 1806-1923
Contributing Institution:
College of Charleston Libraries
Media Type:
Manuscripts
Personal or Corporate Subject:
Heyward family, Confederate States of America. Army. South Carolina Infantry Regiment, 1st.
Topical Subject:
Bull Run, 2nd Battle of, Va., 1862
Geographic Subject:
United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865
Shelving Locator:
MSS 0092
S.C. County:
Charleston County (S.C.)
Internet Media Type:
image/jpeg
Digitization Specifications:
700 ppi, 24-bit depth, color, Epson Expression 10000XL scanner, Archival Master is a tiff.
Copyright Status Statement:
Digital image copyright 2009, The College of Charleston Libraries. All rights reserved. For more information contact The College of Charleston Library, Charleston, SC 29424.