179. M. Munro to Maria Heyward -- September 24, 1862

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    Anderson Sept. 24th 1862. Mrs Heyward, Dear Madam, I trust you will not deem me intrusive- one common sorrow is alone my apology for addressing you. My son fell at Manassas on the 29th of August. The explosion of the same shell, cost you the life of your son. I learn from a letter received a day or two ago- from Lieut. Chambers (now Capt of "The Carolina Light Infantry") that your son and mine lie side by side, in one grave. Capt. Chambers writes me that he did all he could to render their burial such as he and I would desire, "but being unable to procure a spade, he ordered the Pioneer Corps and had a grave dug, and laid the two side by side therein" - but regrets very much that he was un [End Page 1] -able to make the grave a better one. I judge from his letter, and from information obtained through Col McGowan, that our beloved ones were committed to the earth, without being placed in a coffin. It is my husband's intention, when the weather is cooler, to send on for the remains of our child, and my object in writing to you, is to ascertain whether you intend to send for your son's- if so I would propose to you, that if possible we might make arrangements to send at the same time- the circumstances of the case, seem to require that the disinterment of both bodies, should take place at one time- neither, if my information is correct, can be disinterred alone, without some violence or exposures, offered [End Page 2] to the precious remains, dear to your heart, and to mine, if either of us, undertake this work alone. If it meets with your desire, and approbation that this work should be performed together- you will please communicate with me relative to the time you would wish to send on. I would require a notice sometime beforehand, as the only son I can send on is at Pocotaligo in the Commissary department- he would have to obtain a furlough, and make preparation. I trust you will excuse this intrusion on your sorrow, but my beloved child's remains are so precious to me. I could not bear that they should be otherwise than most tenderly touched on the other hand I felt that [End Page 3] those of your son, was equally precious to you- and I could not bear to be instrumental in inflicting pain on you. I shall direct this letter to Mrs N Heyward- I am at a loss to know, if that is the person I should address- if not I trust that through some instrumentality it will find its way into the proper hands- Very Respectfully M Munro [End Page 4]
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    Anderson Sept. 24th 1862. Mrs Heyward, Dear Madam, I trust you will not deem me intrusive- one common sorrow is alone my apology for addressing you. My son fell at Manassas on the 29th of August. The explosion of the same shell, cost you the life of your son. I learn from a letter received a day or two ago- from Lieut. Chambers (now Capt of "The Carolina Light Infantry") that your son and mine lie side by side, in one grave. Capt. Chambers writes me that he did all he could to render their burial such as he and I would desire, "but being unable to procure a spade, he ordered the Pioneer Corps and had a grave dug, and laid the two side by side therein" - but regrets very much that he was un [End Page 1] -able to make the grave a better one. I judge from his letter, and from information obtained through Col McGowan, that our beloved ones were committed to the earth, without being placed in a coffin. It is my husband's intention, when the weather is cooler, to send on for the remains of our child, and my object in writing to you, is to ascertain whether you intend to send for your son's- if so I would propose to you, that if possible we might make arrangements to send at the same time- the circumstances of the case, seem to require that the disinterment of both bodies, should take place at one time- neither, if my information is correct, can be disinterred alone, without some violence or exposures, offered [End Page 2] to the precious remains, dear to your heart, and to mine, if either of us, undertake this work alone. If it meets with your desire, and approbation that this work should be performed together- you will please communicate with me relative to the time you would wish to send on. I would require a notice sometime beforehand, as the only son I can send on is at Pocotaligo in the Commissary department- he would have to obtain a furlough, and make preparation. I trust you will excuse this intrusion on your sorrow, but my beloved child's remains are so precious to me. I could not bear that they should be otherwise than most tenderly touched on the other hand I felt that [End Page 3] those of your son, was equally precious to you- and I could not bear to be instrumental in inflicting pain on you. I shall direct this letter to Mrs N Heyward- I am at a loss to know, if that is the person I should address- if not I trust that through some instrumentality it will find its way into the proper hands- Very Respectfully M Munro [End Page 4]
  • Image 01
    Anderson Sept. 24th 1862. Mrs Heyward, Dear Madam, I trust you will not deem me intrusive- one common sorrow is alone my apology for addressing you. My son fell at Manassas on the 29th of August. The explosion of the same shell, cost you the life of your son. I learn from a letter received a day or two ago- from Lieut. Chambers (now Capt of "The Carolina Light Infantry") that your son and mine lie side by side, in one grave. Capt. Chambers writes me that he did all he could to render their burial such as he and I would desire, "but being unable to procure a spade, he ordered the Pioneer Corps and had a grave dug, and laid the two side by side therein" - but regrets very much that he was un [End Page 1] -able to make the grave a better one. I judge from his letter, and from information obtained through Col McGowan, that our beloved ones were committed to the earth, without being placed in a coffin. It is my husband's intention, when the weather is cooler, to send on for the remains of our child, and my object in writing to you, is to ascertain whether you intend to send for your son's- if so I would propose to you, that if possible we might make arrangements to send at the same time- the circumstances of the case, seem to require that the disinterment of both bodies, should take place at one time- neither, if my information is correct, can be disinterred alone, without some violence or exposures, offered [End Page 2] to the precious remains, dear to your heart, and to mine, if either of us, undertake this work alone. If it meets with your desire, and approbation that this work should be performed together- you will please communicate with me relative to the time you would wish to send on. I would require a notice sometime beforehand, as the only son I can send on is at Pocotaligo in the Commissary department- he would have to obtain a furlough, and make preparation. I trust you will excuse this intrusion on your sorrow, but my beloved child's remains are so precious to me. I could not bear that they should be otherwise than most tenderly touched on the other hand I felt that [End Page 3] those of your son, was equally precious to you- and I could not bear to be instrumental in inflicting pain on you. I shall direct this letter to Mrs N Heyward- I am at a loss to know, if that is the person I should address- if not I trust that through some instrumentality it will find its way into the proper hands- Very Respectfully M Munro [End Page 4]
  • Image 01
    Anderson Sept. 24th 1862. Mrs Heyward, Dear Madam, I trust you will not deem me intrusive- one common sorrow is alone my apology for addressing you. My son fell at Manassas on the 29th of August. The explosion of the same shell, cost you the life of your son. I learn from a letter received a day or two ago- from Lieut. Chambers (now Capt of "The Carolina Light Infantry") that your son and mine lie side by side, in one grave. Capt. Chambers writes me that he did all he could to render their burial such as he and I would desire, "but being unable to procure a spade, he ordered the Pioneer Corps and had a grave dug, and laid the two side by side therein" - but regrets very much that he was un [End Page 1] -able to make the grave a better one. I judge from his letter, and from information obtained through Col McGowan, that our beloved ones were committed to the earth, without being placed in a coffin. It is my husband's intention, when the weather is cooler, to send on for the remains of our child, and my object in writing to you, is to ascertain whether you intend to send for your son's- if so I would propose to you, that if possible we might make arrangements to send at the same time- the circumstances of the case, seem to require that the disinterment of both bodies, should take place at one time- neither, if my information is correct, can be disinterred alone, without some violence or exposures, offered [End Page 2] to the precious remains, dear to your heart, and to mine, if either of us, undertake this work alone. If it meets with your desire, and approbation that this work should be performed together- you will please communicate with me relative to the time you would wish to send on. I would require a notice sometime beforehand, as the only son I can send on is at Pocotaligo in the Commissary department- he would have to obtain a furlough, and make preparation. I trust you will excuse this intrusion on your sorrow, but my beloved child's remains are so precious to me. I could not bear that they should be otherwise than most tenderly touched on the other hand I felt that [End Page 3] those of your son, was equally precious to you- and I could not bear to be instrumental in inflicting pain on you. I shall direct this letter to Mrs N Heyward- I am at a loss to know, if that is the person I should address- if not I trust that through some instrumentality it will find its way into the proper hands- Very Respectfully M Munro [End Page 4]
Title:
179. M. Munro to Maria Heyward -- September 24, 1862
Creator:
Heyward and Ferguson families, 1806-1923
Date:
1862-09-24
Description:
Letter from M. Munro to Maria Heyward concerning the deaths of their sons at the Second Battle of Bull Run who were killed by the same shell, August 29, 1862. Mrs. Munro writes that she is planning on retrieving the hastily buried body of her son and since Maria's son, Nathaniel, is in the same grave she inquires whether or not Maria would like to coordinate a plan to disinter her son as well. She notes that according to her information neither body "can be disinterred alone, without some violence or exposures, offered to the precious remains,..., if either of us, undertake this work alone." 4p. September 24, 1862.
Collection:
Heyward and Ferguson Family Papers, 1806-1923
Contributing Institution:
College of Charleston Libraries
Media Type:
Manuscripts
Personal or Corporate Subject:
Heyward family, Confederate States of America. Army. South Carolina Infantry Regiment, 1st.
Topical Subject:
Bull Run, 2nd Battle of, Va., 1862
Geographic Subject:
United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865
Shelving Locator:
MSS 0092
S.C. County:
Charleston County (S.C.)
Internet Media Type:
image/jpeg
Digitization Specifications:
700 ppi, 24-bit depth, color, Epson Expression 10000XL scanner, Archival Master is a tiff.
Copyright Status Statement:
Digital image copyright 2009, The College of Charleston Libraries. All rights reserved. For more information contact The College of Charleston Library, Charleston, SC 29424.