178. Mary Heyward to Frank Heyward -- September 11, 1862

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    Columbia, Sept 11th 1862 My dear Frank, We all know that you are anxiously waiting to hear if Uncle James has telegraphed any thing from Richmond. A telegram arrived this morning and he says that there is no doubt of poor Nat's death. I write you word about it immediately my dear Frank, for we think it is better for you to know that it is so and not deceive yourself with false hopes. The suspense and dread of his perhaps having had a painful release from this world has been awful, [End Page 1] but as far as we can gather from reports we are led to hope that it was instantaneous. Uncle James does not mention any particulars but only the fact and says he is going on to Gordonsville tomorrow to see if he can possibly find John, or get to the battleground. Be assured of our deepest sympathy and sorrow for this great affliction sent by the hand of God. It is a great warning to us all that while in his life we are in the midst of death. We feel as if we too had lost a brother and shed our tears together. The war has really come home to us and desolated our fireside like that of many other afflicted families. [End Page 2] Your poor mother is dreadfully distressed and of course looks very badly and careworn. I believe she is in bed at present since she received the confirmation of the report in the paper. I think she was too much buoyed up by the rumour that got about of its being some other Heyward and now she has relapsed into a state of great despondency and grief. Emma too is in very low spirits. We do everything we can to cheer but there is no consolation for such a loss. It always has been said that the misery overbalances the happiness in this world of cares and our happy circle [End Page 3] begins now to feel the reality and when the vacant place reminds us of the dear absent one we cannot help grieving and wishing him back. I feel very very sorry for you my dear Frank in the midst of Camp life at such a time as this, surrounded by the cold looks and words of uninterested people but I hope that when Uncle James returns he will determine to get you a furlough so that you may find some relief by being a little time with us all. I am glad Edward is with you as he is one who will join deeply in all your sorrow. I will write again soon and now remain Your ever affectionate cousin Mary [End Page 4]
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    Columbia, Sept 11th 1862 My dear Frank, We all know that you are anxiously waiting to hear if Uncle James has telegraphed any thing from Richmond. A telegram arrived this morning and he says that there is no doubt of poor Nat's death. I write you word about it immediately my dear Frank, for we think it is better for you to know that it is so and not deceive yourself with false hopes. The suspense and dread of his perhaps having had a painful release from this world has been awful, [End Page 1] but as far as we can gather from reports we are led to hope that it was instantaneous. Uncle James does not mention any particulars but only the fact and says he is going on to Gordonsville tomorrow to see if he can possibly find John, or get to the battleground. Be assured of our deepest sympathy and sorrow for this great affliction sent by the hand of God. It is a great warning to us all that while in his life we are in the midst of death. We feel as if we too had lost a brother and shed our tears together. The war has really come home to us and desolated our fireside like that of many other afflicted families. [End Page 2] Your poor mother is dreadfully distressed and of course looks very badly and careworn. I believe she is in bed at present since she received the confirmation of the report in the paper. I think she was too much buoyed up by the rumour that got about of its being some other Heyward and now she has relapsed into a state of great despondency and grief. Emma too is in very low spirits. We do everything we can to cheer but there is no consolation for such a loss. It always has been said that the misery overbalances the happiness in this world of cares and our happy circle [End Page 3] begins now to feel the reality and when the vacant place reminds us of the dear absent one we cannot help grieving and wishing him back. I feel very very sorry for you my dear Frank in the midst of Camp life at such a time as this, surrounded by the cold looks and words of uninterested people but I hope that when Uncle James returns he will determine to get you a furlough so that you may find some relief by being a little time with us all. I am glad Edward is with you as he is one who will join deeply in all your sorrow. I will write again soon and now remain Your ever affectionate cousin Mary [End Page 4]
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    Columbia, Sept 11th 1862 My dear Frank, We all know that you are anxiously waiting to hear if Uncle James has telegraphed any thing from Richmond. A telegram arrived this morning and he says that there is no doubt of poor Nat's death. I write you word about it immediately my dear Frank, for we think it is better for you to know that it is so and not deceive yourself with false hopes. The suspense and dread of his perhaps having had a painful release from this world has been awful, [End Page 1] but as far as we can gather from reports we are led to hope that it was instantaneous. Uncle James does not mention any particulars but only the fact and says he is going on to Gordonsville tomorrow to see if he can possibly find John, or get to the battleground. Be assured of our deepest sympathy and sorrow for this great affliction sent by the hand of God. It is a great warning to us all that while in his life we are in the midst of death. We feel as if we too had lost a brother and shed our tears together. The war has really come home to us and desolated our fireside like that of many other afflicted families. [End Page 2] Your poor mother is dreadfully distressed and of course looks very badly and careworn. I believe she is in bed at present since she received the confirmation of the report in the paper. I think she was too much buoyed up by the rumour that got about of its being some other Heyward and now she has relapsed into a state of great despondency and grief. Emma too is in very low spirits. We do everything we can to cheer but there is no consolation for such a loss. It always has been said that the misery overbalances the happiness in this world of cares and our happy circle [End Page 3] begins now to feel the reality and when the vacant place reminds us of the dear absent one we cannot help grieving and wishing him back. I feel very very sorry for you my dear Frank in the midst of Camp life at such a time as this, surrounded by the cold looks and words of uninterested people but I hope that when Uncle James returns he will determine to get you a furlough so that you may find some relief by being a little time with us all. I am glad Edward is with you as he is one who will join deeply in all your sorrow. I will write again soon and now remain Your ever affectionate cousin Mary [End Page 4]
  • Image 01
    Columbia, Sept 11th 1862 My dear Frank, We all know that you are anxiously waiting to hear if Uncle James has telegraphed any thing from Richmond. A telegram arrived this morning and he says that there is no doubt of poor Nat's death. I write you word about it immediately my dear Frank, for we think it is better for you to know that it is so and not deceive yourself with false hopes. The suspense and dread of his perhaps having had a painful release from this world has been awful, [End Page 1] but as far as we can gather from reports we are led to hope that it was instantaneous. Uncle James does not mention any particulars but only the fact and says he is going on to Gordonsville tomorrow to see if he can possibly find John, or get to the battleground. Be assured of our deepest sympathy and sorrow for this great affliction sent by the hand of God. It is a great warning to us all that while in his life we are in the midst of death. We feel as if we too had lost a brother and shed our tears together. The war has really come home to us and desolated our fireside like that of many other afflicted families. [End Page 2] Your poor mother is dreadfully distressed and of course looks very badly and careworn. I believe she is in bed at present since she received the confirmation of the report in the paper. I think she was too much buoyed up by the rumour that got about of its being some other Heyward and now she has relapsed into a state of great despondency and grief. Emma too is in very low spirits. We do everything we can to cheer but there is no consolation for such a loss. It always has been said that the misery overbalances the happiness in this world of cares and our happy circle [End Page 3] begins now to feel the reality and when the vacant place reminds us of the dear absent one we cannot help grieving and wishing him back. I feel very very sorry for you my dear Frank in the midst of Camp life at such a time as this, surrounded by the cold looks and words of uninterested people but I hope that when Uncle James returns he will determine to get you a furlough so that you may find some relief by being a little time with us all. I am glad Edward is with you as he is one who will join deeply in all your sorrow. I will write again soon and now remain Your ever affectionate cousin Mary [End Page 4]
Title:
178. Mary Heyward to Frank Heyward -- September 11, 1862
Creator:
Heyward and Ferguson families, 1806-1923
Date:
1862-09-11
Description:
Letter from Mary Heyward to her cousin Frank Heyward about the death of his brother Nathaniel at Manassas. She writes that his father, James, is traveling to Gordonsville, Virginia, and possibly on "to the battlefield" and laments "the war has really come home to us." 4p. September 11, 1862.
Collection:
Heyward and Ferguson Family Papers, 1806-1923
Contributing Institution:
College of Charleston Libraries
Media Type:
Manuscripts
Personal or Corporate Subject:
Heyward family
Topical Subject:
Bull Run, 2nd Battle of, Va., 1862
Geographic Subject:
United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865
Shelving Locator:
MSS 0092
S.C. County:
Charleston County (S.C.)
Internet Media Type:
image/jpeg
Digitization Specifications:
700 ppi, 24-bit depth, color, Epson Expression 10000XL scanner, Archival Master is a tiff.
Copyright Status Statement:
Digital image copyright 2009, The College of Charleston Libraries. All rights reserved. For more information contact The College of Charleston Library, Charleston, SC 29424.