David Henry Mordecai Travel Diary (1856-57)

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    September 7th Gave to Hammond br 3 Th 6 gr Independence belge Repaid for me 25 gr and 12 gr [sketches of people's heads in profile]
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    Memoranda The object of a diary is two fold 1st to cultivate a talent for accurate and graphic description of things and persons. 2nd to give an account of the manner in which your time has been passed to be referred to in the future "Foreit an haec olim meminisse juvabit". Weber gusse No.22- bei Kaufmann Thomas [sketch of triangle with top point labeled A, mid-line points labeled B and C, bottom points labeled B[^1] and C[^1]] ab[^2] /2 ABxBC[^1] / 2 AB[^1]xB[^1]C[^1] /2 2(ABxB[^1]C[^1]) / 2 + ABxBC[^1] / 2 = [triangle symbol]AB[^1]C[^1] + [triangle symbol]ABC
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    [illegible]
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    "Forsitan haec olim meminisse juvabit" [A line from Virgil's Aeneid, slightly misquoted; the exact quote is: "Forsan et haec olim meminisse iuvabit" - "Perhaps one day it will be helpful to remember these things." The words "haec olim meminisse iuvabit" appear on the College of Charleston gate on Calhoun St.] July 1st 1856 Ruddita Ruddundor David Henry[?] Mordecai Mordecai
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    Ems July 1st 1856 Settled at last! A feeling of comfort penetrates me, as a Frenchman would say: a feeling which all the objects around me tend to sustain; for my room is large, cool and airy, furnished with neatness and some degree of elegance; and with every convenience. My windows look out upon the panorama of Ems -upon the Boederlei & Boederberg; but the curtains are just now drawn close to exclude the protracted twilight, and my candles are burning cheerfully on my desk- I feel a delicious sense of repose- I am almost "amoreux de moi-meme." My room is dear but by cutting off the luxury of wine and coffee, (which do not agree with the cure): by resisting the temptation to buy trinkets and books. by limiting my excursions in voiture &c= I can afford it; and [illegible] the room
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    which has so great an influence upon my thoughts and feelings deserves the Sacrifice, if sacrifice it be. I have dismissed my trunks (ugly and expense things- impediments truly) to a garret, and my clothes and books are arranged in bureau, armoir, and on the tables- on which last also lie the daguerrotypes of all the dear ones at home, which I glanced at this evening for the first time Since leaving it. (There is one nuisance attendant upon all the German rooms in which I have lodged. It is that you cannot talk without being overheard by your neighbours; or remain quiet without the delights of listening to the conversation of the people on either side- without being conscious of every note of their music, cry of their infant or bark of their pet dog: for next to my room
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    on the right is a french lady with a canine pet; and on my right an English Gentleman who attempts the piano and Italian opera music) The entering wedge of acquaintance to day was put in motion of Dr. Vogler. He introduced me to Mr. Wagnaar- now a citizen of New York. He seems agreeable, and as he has acquaintance here I hope it will lead to others. It is dreary enough promenading without the knowledge of a single individual. N.B. It is the custom in Germany not only to take off your hat to your own friends and hold it at arms length, but to observe the same ceremony when you are walking with a person who salutes a lady with whom you may not have the honor of acquaintance= [A...?] Dr. Vogler= Thermometer in my room 9.P.M 13 1/2 Reaumur: Windows closed
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    Wednesday July 2nd open windows Thermometer 9. A.M 12 1/2 9. P.M 13/windows closed The day has been windy, cold and disagreeable. My thickest overcoat has been comfortable in the open air. Yet nothing seems to deter the Germans and Russians from their regime- They are as much in the air as they would be if the Thermometer was at 20 in the Shade. They seem to have an idea that if they come to a watering place, it is a sort of moral duty not to remain indoors= ; & yet one would think that setting under shade trees /on a day such as this anything but adapted to persons susceptible of lung or throat disease. This would have been a magnificent day for an excursion- but the d---d swelling precludes my taking anything but a gentle walk. I did not go to the Kasselbrunnen until half past Seven this morning. The
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    usual crowd- the physiognomy of which I have not yet studied to my satisfaction= faute de connais anees. Dr. Vogel brought up Mr Bailey of Philadelphia, & Mr. Cooper of New York. After breakfast I remained in my room until nearly dinner time- reading guide books; and writing a letter to Boyd= At twelve I go to the Reading room. The newspapers which I read are the Independence Belge & The Times= I read something after dinner in the Revue des deux mondes. I find all the European Press- as far as I have read loud in their acclamations about "Englands moderation" touching our Central American affairs= and so far too I have not seen my own country mentioned without a half-concealed sneer. After dinner I returned to my room to take my first German lesson from Dr Schupler. Our
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    conversation is to be carried on in French, which he speaks imperfectly and with a horrible German accent- His command of that language is better than of English however- After my lesson and the promenade and the usual glass of Kranchen= Je me promenai seul, until I met Mr. Wagner- with whom I had an agreeable walk and chat. Oh that I spoke German! The beauties of Ems begin to grow upon me. We had a fine sunset this afternoon- and the Scene was really beautiful- So many [tints?] and [forms?], and movements all gracefully, and as Mr. Wagner expressed it coquettishly mingling together- Wherever you walk the delicious smell of the new cut hay salutes your nostrils-
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    July 3d. 9 A.M. open window 12 1/2 9 P.M. closed windows: 12 1/2 open 10. Spring and promenade as usual. After breakfast I wrote a long letter to Boyd- a note to Mr. Grunebaum- and one to Sachtleter's father advising him that I send the picture of his grandaughter. Entertained Dr. Vogler for a few minutes. It was then time to shave= which under the hands of a German barber is a disgusting operation. He lathers you with this fingers, and uses a sharp and thin razor which bleeds but does not clean the face. Read the newspapers in the "Lese Cabinet". Met there Mr. Wagner with whom I dined in company at the Kurhaus. We had music. He introduced me to Herr Richter from Hamburg; and gave some valuable hints how to make acquaintance. Salutation upon the slightest occasion to the rule- whether at the table d'hote- or on the promenades. I put his lessons in practice this evening.
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    : for seating myself at the same sofa, I made some remark about the weather to a young man seated next to me- which led to a conversation- to a supper together- and to an appointment for a further meeting- finally to an exchange of cards- He is only however "durch-greisend" as they call passing travellers here. He is a lawyer- young- intelligent- but not very knowing in the world- His card is "E Oger du Rocher Avrennes Rue aux Foulons 16" We spent a while on the Cursaal watching the play of the Prince of Casino [Canino] Lucien Napoleons son. He is a joueur- and the amount of gold he has won and lost creates quite a sensation within the past two days in the usually undissipating and quiet town of Ems. We had music; and consequently the ladies in the Cursaal.
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    I made some progress in my Roman grammar. The weather- as will be seen by my thermometer has been disagreeably cool. Friday morning July 4th: Thermometer open air 9. 10 1/2 Cold- disagreeable= bad headache in the evening- no letters- confound the mail. Saturday July 5th. open air Thermometer 10. A.M: 12: The weather continues cold and damp. Out of doors is uninviting, and I have a bad cold in my head. The Niagara has brought me no letters, which puts me out of sorts more than it ought to do. Occupied with German grammar during the forenoon. Dined at the Kurhaus. At the table d'hote your neighbour generally addresses you, or you your neighbour. I am not yet
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    able to observe whether this [allons/allows?], much less exacts a recognition afterwards. How is it with ladies? how with Gentlemen? At any rate the practice is agreeable, and beguiles the time occupied by a German dinner, which otherwise would hang most heavily upon a Solitary Stranger. My neighbour today was a Hamburg lady- the wife of an English merchant resident there. She was exceedingly communicative, and required equal communication in return, so that we found out all about one another before the dinner was over. There was a reunion dansante at the Kursaal this evening. As most persons here are invalids- there was not much dancing- and the company dispensed about ten oclock.
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    July 6th Therm: 10 A.M 11 1/2; 10.PM. 12 1/2 I was lazy and rose too late for my good this morning. I find the kassel-brunnen too exciting, and am advised to take Kranschen instead. I feel an inconvenience in taking these waters= costiveness- headache, and pain in the stomach= I must be more careful in regard to dist= The weather is improving. The larger part of the day was devoted to writing home. In the evening I walked to the Lindenbach, where thas[?] music of course; as on every Sunday afternoon, and some dancing and the usual amount of smoking and eating and drinking = July 7th Thermr. 10.A.M 13 9/10 10.P.M 14 I rose rather earlier this morning, and have gained an hour in consequence. The air is warmer; but the sky which was clear at six is now clouding over- and I fear that she shall have rain again. I walked with Mr. Wagner down the Grab-Strasse- in hopes to discover some traces of the old Roman Wall; but I did not succeed in finding any.
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    It is pleasing to have the peasants salute in the morning- "gut morgen" with a smile, or a touch of the hat is what you receive from almost every rustic. Mr. Wagner tells me that the operatives upon the rail-road now in process of construction receive only 32 krs per diem about 21 cts per day; and that this hardly keeps soul and body together; which I readily believe. Boats are carried up stream here by attaching a rope to a pole or mast and harnessing it to a horse on the bank. The current is not strong enough always to carry them down= but in descending the rope is pulled by two men. We have no music in the Kursaal this morning on account of the expected death of the Duchess of Nassau-
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    Mr. Wagner and myself dined together at the Kurhaus: Mem. To observe carefully the tone of the European Press towards the United States= and the Special views of some of the leading papers and reviews- and to make some extracts. I took a lesson from Dr. Schupler. His very dirty appearance rather disgusts me. As there is no one language with which we are both familiar I have had little general conversation with him. My walk this afternoon led me by the old Catholic Church to the Henneten boey[?]= and thence along the left bank of the Lahn= a beautiful promenade. A melancholy occurrence has taken place in our house. Yesterday the minister of Public instruction in France Mr. Fortoul who arrived only a few days ago, was stricken down by apoplasy and died in a
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    few hours. A telegraphic dispatch announces also the death of the Duchess of Nassau. July 8th. Therm. 9.A.M: 15; Every body is busily engaged in cutting the grass. Cherries, Strawberries, &c are in Season- though not of very fine flavor. The roses which are grown here have a delicious perfume. This seems to be an abominable climate. I do not believe that the temperature is the same for two hours together in the day. I begin to find the bath at 27 [degrees symbol] a great luxury. I look forward with pleasure to half past ten A.M. of each day. Dined with Mr. Wagner at the Kursaal
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    My washing was brought to me yesterday evening. Government regulates the price of washing even a pair of stockings, or a shirt! July 9th Therm. 9.A.M. 13 1/2 12 M. 9PM The morning was fine; and after my first and 2nd glasses I started out on an exploring expedition through Dorf Ems; the bourgoise portion of the village. I discovered a neat building with "Synagoge" inscribed upon it. I have noticed some, but not many Jews among the bathers. I walked some distance on the Coblery road; and returned across the river to breakfast very hungry and very tired. German- bath- and dressing took up until one oclock. The weather has again changed. The wind is from the East- heavy showers during the afternoon. Not being able to walk I amused myself with reading the European papers with some particularity. I notice with great surprise that Raumer the minister of public instruction in Berlin has excluded
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    the Israelites from a participation in the Education fund- set apart for the relief or Support of poor students. Boeck has protested. And this in the country of Mendellsohn. The Steamers with dates from New York have arrived at Liverpool. I hope for letters to-morrow. In the Cursaal during the early part of the evening. July 10th The weather as uncertain and variable as before- now bright and warm- now cold and rainy. The forenoon was employed in German, and in bathing. In the afternoon Mr. Bailey, Mr. Frah and myself drove to Arzbach. This village is in the vicinity of a clay-bed from which is obtained the material for the Cruchons de gre such as contain [illegible/selzer?] water; and the industry of the village is chiefly employed in the manufacture of them. The
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    fabrication is exceedingly primitive. The workman tempers the clay with water- moulds it with his hand by the assistance of a potters wheel, which he turns occasiony with a stick. Even this rude process produces about 120 bottles a day from the hand of each workman. When asked by one of my friends why he did not use some surch agency as water(which is in this situation most easy to apply) to turn his wheel and abridge[?] his labour; he answered- "Oh that would never do- it would never turn the wheel fast enough- and to be sure we make enough" !! He did not consider that he could make the same number in one half the time. But this is not all. After the Cruchons are moulded- they must be burnt. For this purpose they are brought to the public furnace, which is filled every fortnight. This furnace is the property of the Duke of Nassau. Every
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    workman is obliged under the penalty of a fine to bring so many cruchons- per week, and to sell them to the Duke at his own price!!! The women and children, as well as the men have the appearance of exceeding stupidity- an animalism (so to speak) which almost equals that of a plantation negro. The drive is a beautiful one. We had a view of the Sporkenbourg= an old ruin, which forms the top of a hill commanding an extensive view. We returned by the way of the Silber smellz [Silberschmelze]. The country around is rich in ore- which contains about 3 1/2 ounces of silver to the cent[?]; and a rich proportion of lead and copper. The works are extensive one employ 800 men. The Duke has dominion over the soil- and receives so much per annum from the
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    company to whom the mines are farmed. I dined- too luxuriously- with Mr. Bailey at the Hotel d'Angleterre. On my return- oh happiness- I found letters and papers. All well thank God. How little one feels the fund of love which one leaves at home- until you receive letters from the dear ones. God bless them all. I am only down in the blues- because of my Swelling, which is occasioning me some pain, and the apprehension of more. My letters from home state that Mr Tobias remains in a very critical situation. Poor Joe- indeed I feel for him.
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    July 11. Friday. 9.A.M: 12 1/2 cold and rain 9.P.M. (indoors)13 It has been abominable during the entire day. My cold has been so bad that I could not venture much in the open air. The forenoon and the afternoon were both taken upon studying, and in reciting German. Dr. Schupler tells me- that it is compulsory upon all the inhabitants of this Duchy to send their children between 6 & 14 to school. He thinks the Peasantry intelligent. Taxes are not very onerous- and are levied in proportion to opulence. A man's real estate is divided at his death among his children- i.e. actually divided= as in Old English- parcenary= the land in the neighbourhood is the property of the Peasants. I dined at the English Hotel. Mr. Fruh has given me a route for Switzerland in case I travel there; which I have arrived to do, if I can find a suitable companion. The Charleston paper brings an account of the murder of King by Casey in San Francisco; and of the proceedings of the Vigilance Committee= Query whether they are not quite justifiable- despite my
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    thesis against Lynch Law whilst I was in Harvard College. The phenomenon is curious- that in a Democratic Community- the majority who are law-living and law-abiding people have had to take upon themselves this irregular administration of justice. Surely the Stream has been poisoned at the Fountain-head. What can be done when Judges and Juries are corrupt. Quod vanae leges sine moribus &c July 12th 8. A.M. 13.9. The same temps affreux as usual; which not only neutralizes but positively contraries the cure. I am now almost laid up with an accumulation of cold upon cold. I remained in my room perforce during the forenoon hammering away at German; but the afternoon was more pleasantly spent in conversation. What am I to think about what Mr. Bailey tells me of his "communications." Can such things be? Can it be of any importance to me to clear up my doubts? I had a bad headache, and came home early- The Vicar of Wakefield- which
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    I had been translating into German lay upon the table; and I read it through before I went to bed. The gentle, and delightful humour- and the well sustained Dramatic interest (too dramatic) beguiled the hours without effort= I thanked Goldy- (or his spirit) and went to bed with calm and pleasant feelings. July 13th. Yesterday was as disagreeable as can be imagined. With the exception of a few hours in the afternoon, rain, rain, rain; and my rheumaticks are upon me. I occupied the greater part of the day in writing letters home, and to Miss Eloise. I received a letter from Father in the evening. I read some in De Tocqueville's "Ancien Regime".
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    July 14th "Le temps affreux" is the universary[?] subject of conversation. The weather should seem from the accounts of persons arriving here to be no better in any part of Germany, and in some localities worse. I had the kranchen brought to me in my room this morning. Studied German, wrote a letter to Ellen. Dined solus at the Kursaal. In the evening I paid a visit to Mr. [Doo...?] [jauier?]- who has taken the pains to set up a museum in his house for the archeology, and the Natural history and mineralogy of Ems. He is a shopkeeper in summer- and a scientific collector in winter. His collection of Roman antiquities is scant- consisting of a few tiles; and of a few tea vessels. The variety of animal life particularly of the bird and
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    insect species quite surprised me. Mr. [Doogulburrogns?] collection is the work of 8 years. His appearance and conversation (he speaks french and some English) quite prepossessed me= July 15th. The rain has at last ceased. The sky is again blue; and the temperature is warm and serene. I passed a most agreeable day. Mr. Fruh and two of his Swiss friends invited me to make one of a party to Nassau, and The Castles. Our ascent of the [illegible] took up 3 hours and our descent 1 hour. The beautiful Lahn was seen to the best advantage. The castles are interesting from their antiquity; the view from them
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    them commands a beautiful prospect. The exercise, fresh air had an excellent effect upon me= and I went to bed feeling that I had enjoyed a day most delightfully, and most innocently. May such days be many. In the evening I was employed in reading and writing-- July 16th Promenade as usual in the morning; and listen to the music; return half famished to breakfast. The day is again fine. Soon came the hour for a bath. I climbed in vain to the Scwitzer[?] Haus for dinner: was obliged to descend to the Kerhaus. In the evening I went with Mr. Frah on boat to the French haus on the Branbach road; and returned about 10 P.M. quite fatigued. I produced quite a Sensation upon
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    Mrs Balzer by incidentally mentioning that I was the owner of slaves. I am endeavoring to make up my mind how to dispose of myself during the Fall and the Winter. It occasions me some perplexity- since I wish to combine two things not very easily united. Travel and Study: Health- and a good University. July 17th: Another fine day. The morning was spent as usual. I read Butler's speech which Father had sent to me. It is moderate, dignified, and a powerful rebuke upon Sumner although hardly a justification of Brooks. True= the Senate Chamber is not the Senate; but ordinary associations[?] prevent our making the distinction. As for freedom of debate= it is absurd to talk of it in this connection. My own sense of the matter is this. You cannot maintain an action of slander for kinds (pertinent) spoken in debate; but an irresponsible license of speech must excite the
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    passions of resentment and anger= and they must be satisfied. The proper remedy lies in the strict definition of the freedom of debate= and in the strict maintenance of these limits by the Presiding Officer of the Deliberative assembly. I met in the reading room Mr. Lane- from New York a fellow passenger in the Fulton. He has arrived with his daughter. Their faces are the first which I have seen at Ems to recognise as seen before. I dined at Hotel Darmstadt; and was seated with a colloquial crowd- who took me successively for German, Frenchman and Englishman. To their entire surprise I declared myself an American. The Fraulein spoke English; and was very communicative, and equally exacting. After the evening waters: I took rather a fatiguing walk of three hours to the neighbourhood of Lahnstein. On my return home I found a letter from Boyd; and one from home. With what delight I opened them. Mr. Tobias died on the 26th of June last; of the disease, under which for the preceeding ten months he had
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    been sinking. Hannah was married on the 25th. Minnie continues distressingly unwell. Randolph writes me a long and excellent letter on general news &c &c: July 18th: The morning passed a l'ordinaire. In the afternoon I walked with Mr. Fruh to the Kemmena Mountain. The ascent requires an hour and an half of good walking; and when we arrived there we were so much fatigued as not to be able to enjoy the fine view. which the summit commands; and the cool air summoned us to be soon again on the move downward. We took a different route in descending, which brought us out by the Silbersmellze [Silberschmelze]. I wrote to Joe.
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    July 19th I took no long walk today: having experienced some pain, which was a symptom of the necessity of rest. I employed myself during the morning and afternoon with tracing out my route in Switzerland; and debating with myself whether or not I should undertake it. On one side I have the prospect of a most agreeable tour: and of a great improvement in health and strength by the pedestrian exercise. On the other: I have my doubts whether I am at this moment capable of so much exercise; whether my time would not be more profitably spent in learning German in Frankfurt, Offenbach, or Heidelberg; Since after all I may have to go South in the Winter, which would in definitely postpone my acquire ment of this language. I think that I shall leave in the latter part of this week: Take the Rhine down to Frankfurt- slowly: and at
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    Frankfurt make up my mind more definitively. To carry out a single object is always easy. To combine several is always difficult and perplexing. The newspapers bring us accounts from the United States to the 5th of July. The Senate have passed Douglas' bill for the new organization of the territory of Kansas: which I think a wise measure; at least the only one practicable under the circumstances. The House has admitted Kansas a state under the Topeka Constitution. I trust in the firmness of the Senate. The committee on Kansas have made their report; the purport of which alone is given in the English Newspaper. It should seem to condemn[?] unqualified by the conduct of the Missionary[?] from beginning to end in this affair. Can party virulence have
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    entirely destroyed the capacity to see the truth: have the Committee been impressed upon: or is such really the case. The Institution of Slavery is doomed. Whether the Southern States remain in the Confederacy or not: matters but little. England and France have set in fashion a new principle of intervention, of which no man can tell the consequences; (See the articles of the London times on Italy.) and the Southern States in moral antagonism to the Civilised world would be engaged in perpetual hostilities the issue of which is easily foretold. If the Southern States remain in the Union it will be on the tacit understanding, that Slavery is not to make a single step forward; and then it will gradually recede; for reasons too numerous to be suggested here. I fear however, unless
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    the greatest precautions are taken that the whole Country will be lighted up with the flames of Civil War; which I earnestly pray God in his mercy to avert. July 20th Wrote to Mr. Ballin. Took a bath. Read the newspaper. Dined at Hotel d'Angleterre. Talked and walked with Mr. Fruh. Read Tocqueville's Ancien Regime et Rev'n. July 21st. Paid a visit to Mr. Wagner, who played the piano for me during two hours much to my pleasure. Took dinner at the Hotel d'Angleterre with Mr. Fruh. Old French woman as great a love as ever. Wrote home. Walked to the Baederlei. Paid a visit to Mr. Lane and his daughter. Received a letter from Middleton at Dresden:= July 22nd Preparations for departure. Packing trunks &c &c. Supper with Mr. Fruh. July 22nd. Received in the evening answer to my letter and 500 francs from Ballin and Grunebaum, but too late to leave this evening July 26th a bright delicious
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    morning. I bid farewell to Mr and Mrs Balzer and am off to the omnibus Station. Just in time for an outside seat by the 8 oclock. A most pleasant drive to Coblenz. At Coblenz I took the Steamer to Capellen[?] (Holzerpls[?]). Visited the Castle. Took the Steamer to St Goar. Walked (alone) from St Goar to Oberwezel. Rested at Oberwezel and walked to Bacharach. Hotel de Poste. Slept at Bacharach. July 25th Visited the ruins and left Bacharach at nine. Rowed to the Steamer- and went on to Bingen. Walked around Bingen and its environs. Took the steamer at the Rheingauer- a most beautiful sail and arrived at Mayence at 6. P.M. Visited the Cathedral; and walked about the town. Left for Frankfurt at 9. P.M. Hotel. Roman Emperor.
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    July 26th. I walked through the Leil, and had my hair trimmed, and my beard shaved; bought a pair of gloves, and had my hat put in Shape. Being thus rendered presentable I drove to 21 Langstrane; hoping but not expecting to find Messrs [Me?] & Grunebaum & Ballins office open; for they are Jews and today was Saturday. Open however it was and their clerks (all Jews) busily engaged. I was received by young Grunebaum in the absence of his father also in Wiesbaden taking the waters. Grunebaum Jr. received me very kindly and handed me two letter one is from Eloise, dear child; and the other from Sis. What a humble accident is that of the shooting negro Jim. Mother's to go North with Minnie on the 14th inst. Mr. Grunebaum walked with me to "change." The exchange is a fine hall vaulted and supported on marble pillars. The attendance was small to day, as it was Saturday, although today almost all present appeared to me to be Jews. I left Mr Grunebaum and visited the Kaiser Saal, which I recollected very well from my visit six years ago. I also visited again St. Paul's Kirch- and sighed over the [illegible] attempts of the Parliament.
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    Came home to dinner alone [illegible]. After dinner I strolled out, and walked almost completely around the city, and along the Main. Few things can be more pleasant than the belt of gardens planted chiefly in Lindens which surround Frankfurt. Outside of there are Houses built in a variety of Styles and in the west part of the City with much elegance. I returned to my hotel at 6. At half past six young Grunebaum called for me in a carriage to drive me to Hamburg. Our conversation turned upon living at Frankfurt- its cost, advantages, and drawbacks. I hesitate only because I am not certain into what society I may get. Grunebaum is a little over 18, and yet very young, though rather sharp and clever; but good natured. We had an exceedingly pleasant drive to Hamburg, and had a fine view of the Taurus[?] hills. Hamburg is a watering place; and so far has a like character with Ems: but pleasure is the great business at Hamburg, and money won at the Roulette, and trente & quarante is spent lavishly among the Lorettes who abound there. I made my first experimental play at Hamburg. I won twelve florins; but I found the fever coming on; and I left the tables; with an experience that I had not before pursued.
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    We supped at Hamburg; and returned home after midnight. Sunday July 27th: I drove to Mr. Bethmann's Museum. I fancy this place very much as the model of a private gallery. I am not very much pleased with the conception; although exceedingly with the execution of the Ariadne. The red curtains produce rather a meretricious effect. I next visited the Public Library, and learned that to make use of it- I must have a Bursch-schein[?] signed by a known and responsible citizen of Frankfurt. I turned my steps through the Judengasse- again to the Leil: and back to the Hotel. Dined- alone- at the Table d'hote. In the evening I drove out to the cemetery. I was shown the chamber where the dead are placed= the guardians room- and the tell-tale clock. I was also shown the vault of the Bethmann family which contains the bas-reliefs of Thorwalsden [Thorwaldsen?]- and which cost 70.000 francs. They are very beautiful.
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    Driving back through the gardens I [illegible] at the Hotel Main lust[?]. Music by Austrian lad[?] and entrance 6 krs. Many people were collected here: whether of the better class I cannot say. I then returned to my hotel; and have written during the past three hours to Mr. Lennig, to Boyd, Rosengarten, and Miss Eloise. Monday July 28th Finished my letter to Eloise, and wrote one to Tosh, and one to Father. Strolled about the City. Dined at one. A rain storm in the afternoon kept me in doors until evening. A cup of coffee at Cafe Milani- where I found the London times, and the French Newspaper. I finished the day with a visit to the Frankfurt Theatre. A distinguished Actor was to perform Richard 3d from Schlegels' translation: and as of course I was familiar with almost every line I could appreciate the acting. The piece was put upon the stage as Shakspere wrote it, and not as Gibber arranged it. Mr. Haase is an admirable actor- and rendered the part of Richard better to my taste- than any actor I recollect to have seen. To be sure my memory of Macrendy's acting is not very exact. I met young Grunebaum at the theatre, which by the way, was so crowded
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    that I could only get a standing ticket; and he accompanied me to my hotel- a very indifferent one this Romischer Kaiser- and so good night. Tuesday July 29th: Dined with Grunebaum= conversation- but so so. Wednesday July 30th At Heidelberg. Met Magrant= had a pleasant talk, in the evening Rosengarten came round. July 31st Passed through the Library= dined at Cafe Holland- met Mr. Peyton of [Tennep...?], and Mr. Legare. Took tea with Dr. Faler (Randolphs former teacher by) invitation; an exceedly good natured- simple hearted person. met Prof Hoffmann, and Mr. Holland= August 1st= went in the evening to Manheim- August 2nd passed the day with Mr Lennig at Bodenheim- meet-
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    Mr. & Mrs [Stephani/Hephani], Mr. & Mrs von Bulond[?] of Berlin, and Mr & Mrs Grossman. August 3rd again in Heidelberg. Met Janey Lounds- whom I was exceedingly glad to meet- August 4th dined at Cafe Holland- in the afternoon- where most of my afternoons have been spent in the room of Peyton and Legare. August 5th Appointed to leave Heidelberg at 7 with Magrant; but we both slept too late. Left at 11- in Frankfurt at 2. Went to the opera. Linda given but poorly. Weather very warm. August 6th Received a letter from Miss Eloise: Went round with Mayrant to most of the Lights of Frankfurt which I had seen before Mayrant left in the evening. August 7th Left at 3/4 6 for Canal[?]. Arrived at Canal[?] about 1 P.M. [illegible] Port (disagreed) to Munden and then rail to Gottingen- Descended at the Hotel Krone- and inquired for Boyd- and the Prestons= found out their address- went to Boyd room- found him
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    comfortably installed. Alfred Preston came round in a few minutes, and in a short time I was at the Supper Table of the Krone with a crowd of South Carolinians- John & Albert Rhett, William, John & Alfred Preston, and Charles Boyd= but a violent headache, obliged me soon to leave them, and get to bed. August 8th: At about nine went to Boyds room- to find him not yet out of bed. Roused him; and we walked around the ramparts, and enjoyed a long chat. Met the rest of the SoCa crowd at dinner. Adjourned to my room to coffee, and cigars. In the evening came off the great [A...?] Commerce of Gottingen. Boyd who is
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    [mitkneipend][drinking] with the Bremence, went with his [C...?]: but the rest of us enjoyed the scene from the gallery. The novelty of the proceedings above persuaded us to remain and a few minutes in the prisoned atmosphere of smoke, beet vapors, and the reeking of hundreds of oil lamps. August 9th After dinner John Preston carried me to the Museum. The excellent and well conducted Gottingen Club; and in the evening we all met at Prestons rooms for a petit souper Mr. Thomas of S.C., chef Fetzmun's[?] and Drummed[?] of Scotland and Mr. Allen of England being added to those I have mentioned. I am sorry to add that at the winding up there was not a other man in the party.
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    August 11th- Almost every member of last nights party suffering today under a dreadful [g...?]; [illegible] we had a pleasant afternoon at Boyds= At 6 I took my departure in the cars for Hanover - where I am 10 P.M arrived at Hotel Victoria, an admirable contrast to the nastiness of the Crone. I had passed a not unprofitable, and most pleasant time in Gottingen= and flatter myself that I was not disagreeable to the good friends I came among.
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    August 19th. At nine the Commissarion whom I had engaged last night presented himself: and I sallied out leaving myself to his guidance. Our first visit was to the Chateau- Admittance to which is secured by tickets and an exorbitant pour boire. The silver plate= is collected in six or seven rooms; some of it is worthy of admiration from artistic merit; but I was by no means compensated for my 12 groschen by the sight of an incredible number of silver plates and dishes= I was much better pleased with the fine allee near three miles long which leads to Herrnhausen [Herrenhausen]. I had some little curiosity to see this palace, from the mention made of it by Mr. Thackeray in his lectures on the Gerys[?]. The botanical gardens on the opposite side contain fine green houses in which I saw for the first time several tropical plants of great beauty, and very curious ---, I have preserved the names.
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    Pimenta vulgaris= }a delightful odor Oncidium Papilio Nepenthes. Stanopia {occulata speciosa Rhyncestulis Retusa Cocuma Roscoeana On our return we visited the Royal Stables= and the Waterloo Platz. In this Platz is a small temple containing a bust of Leibnitz= [illegible] there. Hannover has few object of interest I believe; at least I could see no more for time was up= and in six hours the rail-raod brought me to Leipsig- Hotel de Bariere[?]=
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    August 12th. My first business was to write home. My letter was directed to Sis; after breakfast I wandered throughout Leipsic= which is more of what I imagined a German town to be than any I yet had seen. I went to Heinisch's bookstore, and parked myself up on German Bibliography. In the afternoon at three set out for Dresden; where I arrived at six. As soon as I was installed at Hotel de Saxe, I started out to hunt up Middleton, I found him, at home, with Harry Hammond for a visitor. I learn from them that it will be very difficult for me to get into a good family. August 13th I had a letter from Dr. Faler last night= enclosing a card from D. C. Seixas[?] at Heidelberg and I found the address of Mr. Wiggins to whom the Dr. had given me a letter
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    of introduction; but arrived there only to learn that he had removed into the Country. I was thus thrown upon my new resources; and immediately commenced inquiring for lodgings. After several ascents and descents of staircases I found apartments in No. 2 Waissenhaus gasse, which I thought would suit me, and indeed determined to take them= as I was pleased with the appearance of the family who had them to let. I met Hammond in the afternoon, and we walked to the Terrace; where there was music in the gardens of the Cafe; and I there met and was introduced to Mr. Cumming of Georgia. We sat together during the evening. August 14th. I had moved all my trunks &c to No. 2 Waissenhaus gasse: and indeed had commenced to unpack and arrange= when to my horror
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    I discovered (it was a Parterre)= Mushrooms growing around the sides of the room= Of course I sent for Mademoiselle: and assured her of the impossibility of my remaining there in which She acquiesced= and giving the Mudchen a thaler to repack my clothes &c I started out again to find lodgings; as yet however I have found nothing which exactly suits me; while this running about (although Hammond & Middleton have both been exceedingly kind in assisting me) fatigues and bores me to death= I came to Hotel Victoria= as in the best vicinity of desirable rooms= and dined at 4 with Hammond who has his abonnement here. After dinner we went around again inspecting rooms; and found nothing. The evening I spent in Hammonds room
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    and finished it with a bath. August 15th. This morning I replied to Dr. Falers note of the 12th; and carried my letter to the Post-Office: where I also received two letters from home with dates to the 22nd of July. Stepped in to Hammonds room; and discussed an announcement for the Anzeiger. I then took a carriage: and rode all over the new town; and a large portion of the old to look at lodgings. Dined with Hammond, and Mr. Cumming; and passed the evening with them- discussing matters and people. August 10th. I paid 1/2 thr. for entree to the Picture Gallery. took particular notice of two Claudes= a Murillo Madonna: a Woman by Titian= and the glorious Madonna del Sisto by Raffaello The last I will not attempt at
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    present to describe. I feel it to be the greatest work of art I have ever seen; "That rapt soul sitting in her eyes"= The first sight of it reminded me of my first sight of Rachel. In calling at the Post office I received my Newspaper. I see [M...?] has acquitted himself well in an oration delivered before his College. The same papers contain Keith's Speech on occasion of his resignation. I do not like it: but it is valuable as a reputation of Sabine's[?] [illegible] upon[?] the services of So Carolina during the Revolution. August 7th Went with Middleton to the Hof. Kirche to hear the Mass. I understood but little of the music, which I am told is very fine. I enjoyed much more the picture gallery in which I remained two hours
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    ; and then again started upon the damned bore of finding lodgings. My announcement in the Anzeiger that a "gentilhomme Americain" desired to find lodging has brought several offers- none of which I have found eligible. I dined at their Hotel (Victoria) with Hammond, and Mr. Cumming; and adjourned after dinner to Mr. Cumming's room. I must overcome that temptation to mental dissipation occasioned by an unsettled state. I have wasted time frightfully in the last two weeks. I studied German for two hours to day.
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    August 18th Monday. Studied some german; and made a final tour in search of lodgings. Hammond tells me at dinner that a captain A von Schulz is willing to take me into his family. August 19th I saw the Captain; but I do not like his arrangements: Studied in good earnest today. August 20th Studied until 12. Engaged rooms with Frau von Altroche at the end of the Prager Strasse; and went to the Picture gallery where I remained until four. Dined: and passed the afternoon with Hammond and Middleton. The evening in Studying German. Received letters from home. Rose & Father; and from Eloise August 21 Visited the [Grune Vyunsvilbn?].[Green __?] " " 22 rain- study " 23 " " 24th " Middleton left for Berlin. " 25th studied= was taken with Catapor. " 26 [through 31] ill in bed with an infurnal [cata...?]= Dr. Walter- attends me= and I am much indebted to Hammond's kindness. Read Qodolphin[?]; and ten thousand a year: but could study no German
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    Monday Sept 1st. By Hammond's aid, and that of a chaise a Porteur I removed to my present quarters No. 13 Prager Strasse. I am yet very weak. Tuesday Sept 2nd. Quarters very comfortable= good and attentive service. I feel somewhat better this morning. Wednesday Sept 3d Commenced again my study of German; and as I could not go out had little else to do all day; but write letters home. Thursday Sept 4th. Weather bad and at home all day employed with German; and picking up Macaulay's history when I felt tired of monotony conjugating verbs; and hunting up words in the dictionary.
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    Friday Septr. 5. Not able to move out of my room. Few days since I have walked in the fresh air; with the prospect of a month more on my bed. This demands a little fortitude. I keep myself employed during my entire day with German; and a little English. My German is such hard work that 8 or nine hours study of it is telling. If I could only read with ease I should not mind my confinement. Hammond paid me a visit this morning. I received a letter from Sis; and the newspaper. The most cheering event of my life, since the receipt of the last budget from home In the evening I called to pay my respects to Frau von Altroche[?], and daughter. If I was well I should probably have a very pleasant time.
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    Saturday Sept 6th. German during the forenoon. After dinner, the clouds having lifted and left the air calm and pure, I took a little walk; but being very weak, felt much fatigued from it. I bought at Adler & Dielze's- a Dictionary, an Atlas, Murrays Guidebook for North Italy, and Schillers works. I read German again in the afternoon. In the evening Hammond came in and we remained conversing on many things until nine PM. I remained up until Eleven- reading German, and looking over Murray- (written Thursday Sep 25th) Sunday Sept 7th Passed in the same manner on the preceding day. Monday Sep 8th Dr. Walter & Dr. Leonardi, in the presence of Hammond, and with the assistance of a Student performed the operation for hydrocele during the forenoon of this day. The operation was not very painful; but of a kind tending to make me feel exceedingly nervous.
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    I of course remained in bed- and have remained there, only rising from it for a few minutes at a time until to day Thursday Sep 25th. Thank God, I am again able to walk, about a little. in this interval I have assiduously studied German; and have made good progress- 200 pages of Schiller's 30 Year War- besides other reading, Grammar & Exercises. I have also Scheer to give me lessons. During this interval I read with attention the two last volumes of Macauly's History. 3, & 4; and the greater part of Murray's Guide to North Italy. This sojourn in bed has given me an opportunity of maturing at my ease my plans of the remainder of my stay in Europe. On looking back therefore I find that it has not been without its good attendants; but many hours I remember also, that were spent sadly, if not impatiently. During this time I received several letters from home- one from Rach- and one from Eloise. I have written home very briefly, partly at a loss what to say; and partly on account of the inconvenience of writing while I lay upon my back.
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    A Charleston Paper; but no letter arrives for me to day. I see that the Support of the State College is being made an "Election question" in several Districts. What can be more [illegible], more selfish, more shortsighted. Great Institutions of learning cannot be "self sustaining" to use their phrase in our country at the present time. and surely if it is desirable to have our people educated at home, it is of course necessary to secure the means. Talk of the right or duty of the State to educate its citizens=! Is not education the indispensable condition of the maintenance of our Institutions- and what makes anything a duty of Government
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    , but that something is to be done towards carrying out the ends for which the State is established, and which cannot be done without the agency of the State. Talk of taking money out of my pocket to educate another man's sons!! Has it come to this? Are these men really mean enough to put forward such complaints; are these politicians means[?] enough to cringe to those who atter them. I am indignant, when I think of it.
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    Thursday Sepr. 25th Passed the day in studying German &c; but felt very worthless during the whole of it- Friday Sep 26th As of late Hammond spent the evening with me. Received letters from home. All well; but no news, sure that the fever is yet not extinct, but rather on the increase. I received a letter from John Guillard. Poor Fellow. he has been ill; and writes as if yet ill. My [illegible] Churn- Cain is engaged to Miss Macbeth[?] (Johns Niece). Lucky fellow- William Henry. Saturday Sep 27th. Randolph's Birthday. God bless him. He is twenty one. The day passed as usual the Dr. came in the evening; and has given me permission to walk a little; as well as to drive out in an easy carriage; but the Symptoms are yet threatening. Sunday 28th.
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    One may learn something of the people of this part of the world by carefully looking over the Anzeiger- or great advertising paper of Dresden. Advertising seems to be carried on to as great an extent as with us. To day Sunday there are numberless announcements of Tanzvereins; and Concerts in Dresden, and in its vicinity= infinite are the attractions (!) of the Speise-Carte of the different eating houses; and as varied in price as the purses of their customers from 5 or 6 ph = to 6 gr a portion. But if I may judge from what I get damned bad at the best. There is something singular also in the announcements of the Deaths, Marriages, and Births= Something so different from our cold formal announcements= and yet after all what a stiff air- they have! How many things are done by others here which in American one has to do for oneself. How much more divided is Labour in domestic Economy= How many things are used
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    which at home are cast away as useless. Everything may be sold here. This is alike produced by, and the product of Economical habit. Induced, I suppose, by the difficulty with which Money is earned = I have returned from a refreshing and delightful drive. Doubly so, because it was the first taste of the open air, which I had enjoyed for three weeks. Oh how bright the Sky- had sweet the air; how exhilarating the feeling of returning strength. Hammond was with me; and we drove over the Weisernitz stream to Racknitz= and thence to Plaun [Plauen?]; and through the Romantic glen called the Plannische Grunde[?]- where the gradually rising ground seems suddenly rift asunder= the jagged masses of rock. which form its sides covered with wood- and twisting and turning in a dozen different directions- as suddenly terminating on
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    an open plain. We enjoyed a fine view of Dresden on our return from The Grunde, from Moreau's Monument. How fresh are the young women of this country; and how dreadfully old- the old women. how uglily marked with the lines telling of a life of labour and care. Nay this perversion of natural expression denoting also a kind of work for which Nature perhaps has not fitted them= I am exceedingly desirous to make enquiries about the culture; and the social condition of the various classes in Saxony; and other parts of Germany; but I am at present in possession of no means of information; nor do I speak the language well enough to go among them in their villages; and find out for myself. This is Sunday afternoon. From my windows I observe the passers by. Every body seems to be amusing themselves in
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    a quiet way? Quare? whether this manner of observing Sunday- (to which I think no Philosophic Moralist, or high minded and wise Statesman can object; but to which Systematic Theologians; and Bigotted Fanatics certainly will) is a result of the German character= ; or whether the habit of this spending the day- having innocent amusements within their reach- has influenced their character. Would it not be a dangerous experiment to try with Americans, and English also unfortunately, seem not capable of enjoying the same kind of pleasures; or really are not. Sophie (the Servant. [M...?]) tells me that she gets only 16 [g...?] a year= with lodging; and eating. Out of these 16 Thrs she must clothe herself= lay up for contingency pleasures &c &c [illegible] a month=
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    Monday 29th: Rose unconscionably late. "Wrote a letter to Mother- Walked out! as far as Hammonds. After dinner German; until Bed time. Tuesday 30th. Last night I had laid out to day's work as follows- 8 hours German- 8 hours exercise recreation &c &c. But how differently was it passed= not ten-minutes German. Such are the fruits of liberty of movement! After Breakfast Hammond brought me Taylor on Climate, which deeply engaged my attention until Ten oclock. The Physician shortly afterward came in, and then Herr Leitner to invite me to pass the evening with them (his mother- Sister & Cousin. At 1/2 11 I took a Droschke and drove out to several shops, and thence to Hammonds; which [illegible] to half past 1.
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    After dinner I resumed Taylor and was engaged upon it the whole afternoon= finished and have made up my mind as to the course I must adopt for the winter. I am to have a consultation with my Doctor about the propriety of my remaining in Germany- and if not advisable for me to do so; I will go I think to Rome- not to Pau. I have just returned from passing a pleasant evening with my Herr Schaft= whose suppers I perceive as far better than my own.
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    Indeed they live and talk like persons of pretty good condition in Society. But not much intellectuality in the conversation. I was equally astonished at the German which I was able to stammer out; and the German which I was able to understand= Our Conversation was carried on it, with the help of occasional French. Oct 1st visited the Picture Gallery
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    The Madonna di San Sisto. [struck through: How the honor of a room to itself and the absence of surrounding objects undoubtedly assists the effect produced.] My imagination had been excited by the celebrity of this picture; and as it has the honor of a room to itself I went in prepared to admire; nor would it have been surprising, if disappointment had resulted from my vague and overwrought expectations. Although Something is to be ascribed to the absence of surrounding objects, yet I do not think any one could look at it under any circumstance for the first time without feeling his emotional nature strongly moved; and his attention strongly arrested. When I first looked upon it, I could hardly refrain from crying
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    out 'how beautiful'! but for something in the picture itself which stilled this transport; and in its place filled me with an intense, but quiet feeling; a mingling of awe and admiration, which kept my eyes fixed for minutes together upon the canvas. Beautiful indeed it is. Beautiful is the face and form of the Mother- beautiful as anything you have dreamt, or seen. Beautiful is the face of the child in her arms- leaving the expression (perfectly rendered) as of infants "when they gaze upon a light. Beautiful is the kneeling St Barbara bidding farewell to Earth; and beautiful are the variety, the lighting and the warmth of the coloring. But the more we look, the more we feel, that it is not the beauty of the picture alone nor even principally which
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    inspires the peculiar feeling to which I have alluded. [struck through: It is difficult to analyze it- [illegible ... ... ...], care for an analysis. But here is my account of it based upon repeated visits] No. But Through that beautiful face, there beams a spirit as beautiful; whose wrapt soul "sitting in her eyes" is lost to all but thought- and thought on high and holy things. And so perfect is the execution of this conception- that we momentarily hold our breaths- as if afraid to disturb such heavenly contemplation. *^It is the same indescribable feeling which as lovely a creature, thus engaged would inspire, were she actually to burst upon your sight= I say momentarily for indeed it is less than momentary space in which the emotions excited by the fascinating character of the subject are not mingled with admiration
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    at the power of the Painter. I do not go as far as some Enthusiasts, who would have us believe that we feel ourselves in the presence of something above humanity. No. [struck through: I cannot feel that is is transcending humanity But it] It is beautiful, and holy; but it is still humanity, which I behold. The picture is indeed wonderful- and will never disappoint a person of the slightest sensibility. * It is, as it were, the visible presence of this pure and thinking soul, which moves us; it is the same &c
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    Oct 2d: [struck through: Studied German; and drove to] German Studies, until eleven. Required a Droschke to take me to Hammond's. Mackenzie, and Cumming there. Cumming drove me to Cafe de l'Europe; where I dined- alone- in the half savage ^and entirely miserable mood in which I always feel when ^alone in the company of utter strangers. Read Murray's Guide book for Rome during the greater part of the afternoon. A huge goblet of Bavarian Beer proving too much for my clearness of head; and the cause, I presume, of an awful headache, which sent me to bed ^at an early hour and doomed ^me to a wretched, wakeful night. Oct 30...I waked this morning late; but without my disagreeable companion of the night. Alas. The day is cloudy, and chilly, and I am condemned to pass the whole of it, I fear, in my room. Ah, this perverseness of our nature! Wrote a letter to Eloise. Received letters from home.
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    Oct 4th. What a glorious day. Cool enough and light enough for a fine November morning at home. After Breakfast, and after paying my respects to Mr. Schneider- [Tailor/Sailor?] New- Market; I drove to the Japanese Palace. Walked through the Museum of Antiquities without feeling any interest or pleasure. The collection is tolerably good for the illustration of Ancient Art; and life; but I have not the requisite "vorstudium" as the Germans Say to render a visit to a Museum of Antiquities very interesting. Much more attractive was the Library in the same building, where I was shown several
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    curiosities: among them the "Atlas Royal" 19 vols costing $14,000; of which only three copies exist. A part of Albert Durer's theatric on the proportions of the human body. A manuscript of Luther; and of Melancthon ^&c &c: This Library is particularly rich in its Historical department. Were I master ^enough of German to feel myself permitted to attend to any thing else I should gladly avail myself of the treasures of this Library- Dined at the Brulische Terrace. Coffee at Cafe Francais. Return home at 1/2 2; and studied German until 1/2 8.
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    Oct 5th I had reason to be more than angry than this morning; but really was too mortified for a while to feel the former exhilarating emotion. Dr. Leonardi had the assurance to inform me, that matters stood as in Statu quo, before the operation; and that either I must submit to another operation yet more painful, and to a confinement yet more irksome; or leave it alone until seriously incommoded and then from time to time adopt the temporary relief. Thus wasted has been my confinement- wasted my time and money! I am literally in statu quo- minus dollars, and minus strength-
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    I have determined to pass the winter at Heidelberg. If the worst comes to the worst- Nice may be reached in 3 days= and there is safety until Spring. I dined with Hammond at the Cafe de l'Europe. Visited the picture gallery.- What a sensation of warmth, and cheerfulness pervades those beautiful landscapes of Claude Lorraine! Received a Charleston paper, which does not however contain many matters of interest.
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    Oct 6th: The day was fine again; and I made a good use of it. From 10 to 12 I was in the Picture Gallery= from which I have been so long, and so unexpectedly kept. At 12 I took the cars to Schandau, where I remained about 1/2 an hour; and then embarked on board the Steamer- to descend the Elbe through the region of the Saxon Switzerland. I can only adopt this mode of its exploration. Scaling such heights as Konigstein= and the Bartei on foot is out of the question. The Scenery is often grand; always peculiar and picturesque,= Reached Dresden at 6. P.M., and the theatre just in time for the last 5 minutes which kept my seat secured. Ristori-Medea. The first time I have seen Ristori. Cannot characterize her acting, as I do not understand Italian:
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    but no one needs a foreign language to read the passions written on the human face- as they come and go. What I understood produced as great an effect upon me, perhaps greater than Rachel has done, on the stage Ristori is beautiful. Oct 7th: My illness has given me a bad habit of rising late. In consequence my German has suffered during these two days. I wrote a letter home- to Sis. Passed the morning: and the afternoon until four- at the Gallery. There are many objects, which a man may have in view- who visits frequently a gallery of paintings. He may propose to himself- the pleasure which arises from a combination of a worthy subject with a fine execution- paintings which fill the mind with types of all that is most beautiful,
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    or most forcible (most capable of rousing our emotional nature). 2. [struck through: To illustrate the human mind], and with a philosophic view- to contemplate the development of painting- as an interesting chapter in the history of the human mind. 3. To learn to desire pleasure from exactness of drawing, from propriety, and richness of coloring, from the skillful arrangement of light and shade. &c &c to become a connoiseur- generally 4. To learn the styles of particular masters. I consider the 3d & 4th the business of the artist; or of the man who feels that he has the genius of the critic. I do not mean to say that the qualities which I have enumerated are not capable of giving pleasure- both in themselves; and subjectively from a consciousness of correct execution
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    but I can find nobler pleasures, and perhaps easier at hand. They are not to be despised however by a person who is happily endowed by nature in this respect. I object to my making a study of such things. The first, and 2nd objects I think worthy of any man's attention. I dined at the Cafe Europe. Returned home to find a letter from my dear Miss Eloise. Studied some German- *I may add to 3d (above) that it is strictly speaking on analysis of the sources of our pleasure- so few as that depends upon the execution of the picture; and as such, any rational man may be drawn into it.
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    Oct 8th. Passed the larger portion of the morning in the Picture gallery. Oh, of how much pleasure am I about to deprive myself by leaving this collection to go to a place, where there is no other to supply the loss of it. I must carry away some memorials of it- One of the hardest efforts, which can be proposed to an undisciplined mind is to sacrifice- ^the comprehensiveness of intellectual desires- to what is really attainable under the circumstances; to learn to know when the half is better than the whole; and to choose it, and to follow it up resolutely, and decisively. The only consideration, which ought to weigh with us is- real development= and have
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    we not an Eternity for this. What is "before thine hand"; that do with all thy might. Oct 9th 10th 11th 12th }Prague. The Judenstadt- The Hradschin- The Churches- The City- 9th Left Dresden at nine AM in the cars for Prague. Hammond; and a Mr. Mackenzie in company. The Prague and Dresden Bahn runs parallel with the Elbe; and almost upon the river bank; commanding a constant view of the Saxon Switzerland; and of the mountains, and picturesque scenery of the banks of the Moldau. Arrived in Prague at two P.M.
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    Hotel Schwarzes Ross- good- After dinner we took a fiacre, and went round the town looking at the exterior of the most interesting buildings, and at the panorama of the city from some good points of view. Visited the Cathedral. 10th. The JudenStadt, or JusefStadt. (I neglected to write up this journal at Prague; and I am too lazy to go over details to night) Oct 13th
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    Oct 13th. Much of to day was wasted with petty occupations- the preparations for leaving Dresden &c Oct 14th Ditto Ditto- Alas, Alas-! Oct 15th " " " " Oct 16th. Having waited in rain for the arrival of the case of glass which was to be forwarded to Hammond from Prag; I took leave of Dresden and of the family von Albrock at six P.M. The railways to Leipsig gave me the opportunity of talking English to a travelling German Merchant I determined (faute d'argent) to come direct from Leipzig to Heidelberg by the Courier zug. A few minutes before the train left Leipzig- an incident occurred, which though ludicrous, was at the time exceedingly annoying.
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    The Conductor came round to inspect the tickets. I put my hand into the pocket in which I was sure that I had put it; but lo! the ticket was not there. I searched and searched in all my numerous pockets. No tickets. The conductor returned. "Have you found your ticket" "No." "You cannot proceed to Frankfurt without one". Knowing that it was useless to remonstrate with this personage I jumped out, while the signal for a start was being given; purchased another- with the condition that I should be reimbursed, if I found it; and returned to my waggon to receive the expressions of sympathy from my fellow passengers- and to ruminate upon my lost ten thalers. Fumbling again in my pockets I found the lost billet in a corner which in my hurry I had
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    left unsearched; and at the next station exultingly received my ten thalers. A wearisome journey all night to Frankfurt [apu?]: where the train arrived at 10 A.M. At 1/2 10 left from Heidelberg; and arrived at 1/2 12- extremely fatigued. [Making my toilette?], I feel myself refreshed; and then found out Magrant. Dined with himself Peyton; and Arnold at Cafe Hollande= and chatted over what had occurred during the interim since my last visit to Heidelberg. Paid a visit to Dr. Faler = in the evening to thank him for his kindness; and returned to the Prince Carl to enjoy a glorious nights repose.
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    Oct 17th This morning I called for Dr. Faler: who takes me round to my present home to introduce me to the family of Prof Sachse. I find only Frau Professor at home: but she receives me kindly. David with the family- increased by the Professor's Sister= and the Herr Professor himself. The Conversation is carried on quite in German. I am, as thus situated subject to many restraints, to which in a Bachelor's life I should not be; but on the other hand I have an admirable opportunity of learning German; and
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    many resources of pleasure from which otherwise I would be cut off. Took tea with the family; but retired to my room at an early hour. Received letters from home to day; and a letter from Henry Young.
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    Oct 19th. Quite [illegible] this morning. Took my breakfast with the family at 1/2 7. Wrote some letters to Eloise, Boyd, and my Banker. Dinner at 1/2 12!! After dinner- a walk- allein[?]- to the beautiful Schloss- and its beautiful gardens. Met Rosengarten; and walked round to his rooms. Went to the Heidelberg Theatre with Fraulein Therese. Actors poor- and Theatre worse; but a good though rather expensive school for learning German. Oct 19th
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    Oct 19th. During the forenoon I was busied in writing letters. Dinner passed off as usual- in a lively manner. Walk in the afternoon to the Castle. Evening at the Theatre. Oct 20th Forenoon busied with writing; and with the arrangements for my sojourn here. After dinner received a visit from Magrant- with whom afterwards I took a walk. What a charming walk- How enchanting- how lovely seemed Heidelberg and its surroundings. "Taking the water", we walked to Handschuhsheim- and thence to the Manheim Chaussee, coming out by and crossing the Bridge. In the Evening went to the Museum Saal to hear two Quartettes of Mendellsohn- very fine I suppose; but much more than I could understand. Came home to eat a huge supper- after which (through sheer weariness) I went to bed. Oct 21st. Peyton took me to Wangerow's Lecture; I was glad to see that I could understand it almost articulately. I went to the Museum. Read the Newspaper= and subscribed for the Semestre. After Dinner I took a walk with Magrant to the Castle- as glorious a prospect as we had yesterday. Went with Rosengarten to their Hauser - but could understand very little.
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    Passed the Evening with the family. Oct 22nd To day I recommenced my study of German; and have engaged a Teacher. Professor Sachsse introduced me to Prof Wangerow; and I have taken a ticket to his lecture. I began Mackledy. I wonder what will be the fruit of my study of Roman Law. Time is becoming more precious in my eyes. God grant it may not here be wasted. Oct 23d. I attended Wangerow's lectures (which are given daily 2 hours 9-11 and 1 hour 12-1) The interesting hour is for "erholung". I can understand both subject and language= although as yet not so articulately as I could desire. In the Evening I made an
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    attempt to go to the Theatre. A severe headache drove me soon from it; Arnold cured me with some homeopathic medicine- the first efficacious remedy for this terrible evil- which I have ever taken. Oct 24th. At Wangerow's lecture. Received letters from home- 3d & 7th October. Poor Taber-! What a Sacrifice! The duel has been noticed in most European Newspapers. At the Theatre in the Evening= Oct 25th. Wangerow in the morning: A walk with Mayrant in the afternoon a lesson in German from Herr Reffis between 5 & 6: and the Theatre during the Evening--
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    Oct 26th Wrote a letter home & to Henry Young: Studied German; and Mackledy. After dinner paid a visit at Dr. Falers. In the Evening - retired from the gesellschaft[social gathering/party] of the family, and of Staats[councillor]- RathBlum and of Fraulein-- [illegible]= my stomach and my head ache. Oct 27th Vangerows voriesun gen von ghi [lectures von-on?] 12.- Mittag- essen- [lunch] Studerin- der Deutschen Sprache. [study of the German language] Ocbund mit der Familie. [evening with the family.] OCT 28 ganz das selbe= nur spaziergang-nachmittag=und abends bei herrn Arnold Spater=studium [Exactly the same=just a stroll-afternoon and evening with Mr. Arnold later=study] Oct 29th= ganz das selbe [exactly the same] Oct 30th= " " " (Hammond arrived last evening [time illegible] and remained a day. We dined together at Prince Carl.
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    Oct 31st= Vangerow. Saw Hammond off. Nov 1st All Saints day: no lectures. Studied German assiduously. Nov 2nd Forenoon wrote several letters- to John Gaillard, and Charles Boyd among others. In the Evening went to Manheim to the opera- William Tell- very finely given. Nov 3d Vangerow. Walk with Arnold and Peyton in the afternoon. Evening with the family. Commenced Hauff's Lich[t]enstein Nov 4th. Vangerow. Museum. Walk with Magrant. German. Evening- Rosengarten called-- Nov 5th Vangerow &c Nov 6th Vangerow. German Hauff's Lich[t]enstein- walk with Magrant. Evening with the family. Two young gentlemen- one of whom was very pleasant- the Herr Homburrger- were added to the usual family circle.
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    Nov 8th. Saturday. Vangerow in the morning as a matter of course. After dinner- the Independence Belge and read a few pages in [Filmar's Liberar Gerchichte?], and in Lichenstein. Went to Peyton's room- and was introduced to Capt [Short?]- an odd Englishman remarkable for his obscenity, and for his accurate classical knowledge, and acquaintance with the history of modern campaigns- and to Capt- [frou Judia?]. Returning- took a German lesson from Keffis- and in the evening with the family. There was a [illegible] present Herr Dr. Boemert (Bomert) editor of the Germania and lately called to edit the Handel's Blatt in Bremen. A young man of twenty seven or eight- with little of the manner of the world; but with a head of unordinary capacity, and with a
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    simple, infamous, German heart. I have seldom met a stranger, who has at the first meeting so much prepossessed[?] me. He has obtained the prize offered by a Dresden Institution for the best answer to the query- "[illegible] the political or social difficulties arising from the temporary abandonment of smaller trades, by the introduction of Machines, or of large factories."- A question asked on a Country like Germany is of great importance, as it must be of frequent occurrence. Much more so than at home. There was a time, when this question was [illegible] warmly discussed
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    in England-- Gute nacht Tage Buch.[Goodnight Journal.] Nov 9th. Wrote a letter to Joe. Nov 14th When I went into the Breakfast room this morning, what was my surprise to find that a commeration of my birthday was already prepared by the family The Frau Professor came in with a large dish- in the centre of which was a cake adorned with flowers- while around the border burned 23 wax lights- one for each year of my age. This she presented with many good wishes- The Professor himself had cut some [pens?] for me- and even the Fraulein Therese had her little offering. I was so much surprised, and so much moved by this kind attention- which seemed to place an [illegible] with the members of the family- that I did not know what to say or how to thank them.
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    Went to lecture. Peyton is laid up on account of a blow received from an attempt to punish an outrage, which one of the managers of the Plebian Ball- the Harmonie, perpretated upon him- in punching his cigar out of his mouth. Unfortunately the fellow is a blackguard; and still more unfortunately, the Police would treat too seriously the castigation, which the fellow richly deserves. Nov 15th Lectures &c Nov 16. Wrote to Eloise and to Mother. To Manheim, to see the Taunhause Nov 17th Vangerow. I slept in Manheim last night, and came back by the morning cars only in time for the lecture. Nov 18th Vangerow. Walk with Magrant= Evening Study. Wrote to Hammond.
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    Nov 19th. Vangerow. Peyton leaves us tomorrow for Paris- and we dined together at the Hallan discher Hof. The Evening was passed in Arnold's room- where we adjourned after dinner. Capt Short is a curious creature a blackguard, and a scholar- if one, who has a good memory, and has read a good deal of all sorts of literature can be called so. He is a great talker- that is- one to whom mere talking seems to give great delight- and like all such talkers becomes in a short time an insupportable bore. Bid Peyton farewell and returned to my room about 12 oclock. Nov 20th. Vangerow. German studies Nov 21st Vangerow. " " Nov 22nd. Vangerow until 11. The distribution of prizes took place at 12 in the University Aula. Schenkel- the Prorector made a very long oration, against Maturation[?]- the greater part of which I did not hear. Received a call from Mayrant- and went to the Museum. Commenced Don Carlos- Nov 23d. Sunday. Continued Don Carlos. and went in the evening to Dr. Faler.
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    finished Don Carlos= although I had seen it upon the stage I could make no pause in my reading. Monday Nov 24th. Vangerow. &c Tuesday " 25th " Wednesday " 26th " Thursday " 27th remained at home unwell. a small Gesellschaft at home this evening Mr. & Mrs. Payne- Dr. Boemer- Dr. Hanel. Friday. " 28th Vangerow. finished Hauff's Novel Lichenstein= weak and poor- except in a few scenes. Received a letter from Sis and Mother Nov 7th. Saturday. Nov 29th Vangerow- a walk with Rosengarten- German lesson= Spent the evening with Mayrant and Arnold= as unintellectually as possibly but [illegible] very pleasantly- Sunday. Nov 30th Rose late, Read the text to the opera of the Hugenots- Wrote a letter to Sis. In the evening at Manheim- opera the Hugenots. was not much pleased. Remained at Manheim. Monday Dec 1st= delayed in Manheim- until 3 P.M. Visited the Schloss= in the picture gallery are some fine paintings of the old Dutch Masters- two excellent by Teniers. In the Italian room is a fine Guido- the Magdalene. I returned to find on my visiting table= a letter from Charles
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    Boyd, which brings the inexpressibly sad intelligence, of the death of Roberts wife on the 1st of November- two weeks after having given birth to a daughter. I immediately answered Charles' letter. Tuesday Dec 2nd. I did not go to the lectures this morning to write a letter to poor Robert; in which I have strongly advised him to change the scenes by which he is at present surrounded, to seek thus an opportunity to engage in that healthy action, which can alone restore in some degree his lost happiness. After dinner I read up the notes on Vangerow. Took a german lesson. Read in the Institutes. Read the newspaper. Looked over Mohl's Geschichte der S. W.[History of the S.W.] especially at what he says of Catherine's[?] work. I do not think he has read it with sufficient attention, and he has evidently been led into his way of thinking by an English, or Northern Review.
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    passed the evening with the family. The Professor tells me that Muller's history of Switzerland was written under the auspices of the French Government= that Zacharia[?] (whom he knew intimately) was quite pure in his private life- and perfectly independent in his works; he thinks Mohl speaks unjustly of him. He spoke much of Blasmana's travestie[travesty] (in German) of the AEneid. written in the time of the Kaiser Joseph II- as a satire agst the R. C. Church. He quoted some sentences from it- which were very amusing. Tuesday 2nd= December: Vangerow= &c as usual. Wednesday 3d. Dec " as usual Thursday 4th= Dec V&c: recd a letter from father 4th Nov. Friday 5th= V &c: Nov. Recd a letter from dear mother= from Sis- and from dear Eloise, Nov 14- & Nov 8th=
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    Saturday Dec 6th. Vangerow. Received some Charleston papers. Translated into German with my teacher. Took a walk with Arnold. Passed the evening with him and Magrant. Sunday Dec 7th. Read in the morning [illegible] part of a letter to Eloise= In the evening I went to Manheim with the family to hear "Don Juan"- at Manheim. Monday, Remained at home to write to Randolph= Evening a walk= Read in Hof-Meister's life of Schiller. The day was in great part wasted= alas.
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    Monday 8th (see the preceding page) Tuesday 9th. Vangerow. Keffis. Walk= Read over the lectures of the last two days. Evening. Fraulein Therese and myself alone- read English and German poetry aloud with her. Went for Mrs. Sachsse at the Theatre. Returned- drank a glass of punch, anticipate reading a few pages, and finishing this cigar. Wednesday 10th=+ Vangerow finished the "general part" of the Pandects- which was crowned with noisy applause, After dinner I read the "Independant" and translated for an hour with Keffis. Walked to the Schloss- a very mild and lovely evening. Returned home at six read in Hof-Meister's life of Schiller= in the evening amused Fraulein Therese, and myself by looking over the new volume, which I have received of the Denkmaler Der Kunst:
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    Thursday 11th Dec. Vangerow. Dined at Hollundischer Hof with Arnold and Mayrant- and took a long walk. In the evening Dr. Hanell, and his brother formed part of our family circle= I have received letters from home to the 21st of November= one of them contains Boyd's letter to Mother= Almighty God, what a sorrow is his. His letter teaches me how wide [illegible] is the tenderest sympathy in comparison to what the subject feels. I feel a singular discontent with myself- in that I must be so far separated in feeling; as nature necessitates. Should not this dreadful event render one more serious than I am- I fear I am becoming fearfully careless of that purity of heart, which is the condition of the exercise of our highest, and [illegible] form this-
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    Friday 12th December. Vangerow. In the afternoon I took a delightful walk to the [Molken Cour?]. Saturday 13th December Vangerow. German lesson- a walk= weather has changed for the worse. In the evening met at Arnolds, who gave a petit souper to some of the "Prussian Corps"= Herr Bendamin, Lowisof, Grraf von Henlenburg, Graf von-- and Herr -- . The supper was good- the wine (Chateau Margaux, and Champagne) flowed in abundance; and the guests were many= the consequence of all which was that I came home with a little more on my stomach, than allowed of that "balmy sleep from pure digestion bred"- and that Sunday 16th Dec
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    I waked with a "halzen-gammer"- which however wore off in the course of the morning. We had at home a few gentlemen to dinner. Took a drive afterwards= Paid my respects to --, with a success, which was not to be expected from the number of the rejected [h...?] = Returned home; and concerned on the history of the acquaintance with German literacy cultivation in England; on Gibbon= Read some English with Fraulein Therese. Read some papers in the annuaire des deux mondes. Wrote part of letter to Eloise.
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    Monday. Remained at home- and read the whole of Schiller's Maria Stuart- intending to see the representation in the evening. Was prevented from doing so by my acceptance of an invitation to the Prussian Kneipe. Went- drank a huge quantity of beer- and came home exceedingly drunk and disgusted with myself. Tuesday. Rose early however, and went to Lecture, of which I confess I was not in a condition to understand much. Took a German lesson. Read some of the "Robber" - and some of the "Schiller's Leben". Convened with the family in the evening.
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    I see by the Independance Belge, that Governor Adams in his message to the Legislature has advocated these extreme views of on the subject of slavery, which have been put forth lately by the Standard, and other papers at the South. I am extremely sorry to see this- Wrote a letter to Ellen Wednesday Dec 17th. Vangerow in the morning: Walked to the Kaiser-Stuhl with Arnold in the evening. Met-- Convened with the family. Read some of Schillers poems. Thursday Dec 18th. I rubbed my foot so severely yesterday that I am obliged to remain at home all day. Read my notes on Vangerow. Read Marezoll's Institutes- Schiller's poems. Friday Dec 17th= Remained at home all day occupied in the same manner. Saturday 20 Remained at home- similarly occupied, until evening. Took tea at
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    Magrants room. Sunday. Dec 21st Wrote a letter to Father- and to Eloise. Went to Manheim in the evening, and saw Figaro's Hochzeit= The music is enchanting. Returned to Heidelberg. Monday Dec 22nd: Disagreeable weather. Remained at home. Read Marezoll- and Schiller. In the evening visited Arnold, and Mayrant= and came back afterwards to tea &c- Read Schiller's Kampf= and Lied an die Freude= Tuesday Dec 23d At home: Marezoll and Schiller- evening rather unwell, Wednesday Dec 24th finished Fiesco; which is disfigured by extravagances; and yet a fine drama for effect. purchased some Christmas presents for Dr. Faler's children, for the family and for the "Josephine." Thursday Dec 25th= This morning I learned that we were to have a Christmas tree, and a "bescheerung". I continued to have my little presents- (which consisted of a paper-weight for Mrs
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    Sachsse, a silver pen handle for the professor, and a copy of Cowper's poems for Fraulein Therese; placed upon the bescherung [distribution of presents;(giving of)Christmas presents or boxes] table. Nay I even got off four lines of doggerel verse to accompany the paper-weight- which was a Silver horse in the act of rearing upon a marble pedestall. Thus ran the lines. Obgleich Ich bin ein zugelloses Thier/ Doch haltet mich das Loos/ Auf Frau Professor's Schreib-papier/ Ich bleib- ein rulhig Ross". ["Although I am an unrestrained wild animal/yet fate holds me/on Frau Professor's writing-paper/I remain a placid tame horse."] This effusion was the source of much amusement- In the evening- the Frauleins Puchelt were invited- and the Herrs Hanel and Lawbe-; the gentlemen however could not come. The Christmas tree which Fraulein Therese had fixed up was in good taste- and the bescherung [giving of presents]
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    bountiful, and from all sides. I was presented with several pretty things= The Professor had written a couple of Strophes to accompany a cake-carrier pigeon, which was among my presents- the subject was New York- and a certain M--- P.----. The evening was spent in as lively a manner as possible. Games- forfeits &c &c in which the Professor took an acting part= I accompanied the Fraulein Puchelt home- and stopped at Arnold's room on my return. Another difficulty- He was at a dinner party at the house of Dr. Jones- the English Physician-; and after the ladies had got up, the conversation happened to turn upon the practice of painting the cheeks. A Mr.
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    Werthemann from Mulhausen said that the practice was almost universal among American ladies. Arnold in a polite way contradicted him- and added that as a general rule it could only be said: that Prostitutes and fancy women generally "used such art. Whereupon the Frenchman (thoughtlessly I suppose) asked him- "does your Sister paint." Arnold was so enraged at such an indignity that seizing his filled wine glass he sent it, glass and contents direct to the forehead of the gentleman(?) adding, that he should consider that as the most mortal insult which he (Arnold could offer him). The Frenchman (who really meant nothing) instantly apologised and then Arnold expressed his regret.
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    They shook hands- and the Frenchman left for home this day (Friday). Arnold of course made an apology to Dr. Jones- for forgetting for a moment that his house was the sanctuary of all his guests- Friday. Schiller. Song of the Bell. Too unwell to do anything, but go to bed at 8 P.M. Mrs. Sachsse had a number of friends to spend the evening with her. Saturday. Better this morning. Took a Russian bath with the best effect= Went with Mrs Sachsse after dinner to see Prof Blum- who showed us some of his collection of precious stones; among them a beautiful topaz- the value of which is 300 guldens.
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    Sunday Dec 28th. Wrote a letter to Sis, and to Charles Boyd. In the afternoon Manheim- Spohr's Jessonda. Monday Dec 29th. Left for Frankfurt at 11. A.M= Arrived at 2. Dinner at Romischer Kaiser. Old Baron Foss. Figaro's Hochzeit- Mrs Grunebaum. Mr. Lee Muller of Baltimore[?] Tuesday Dec 30. Mr LeeMuller and myself at Hanaw[?]. The Carls Berg [illegible]. Letter to the Stadt- Secretar Blum. Young Blum. The [illegible] Fabricants- Return to Frankfurt- Dinner. Theatre= &c. Reflections- Wednesday. Purchase of Books at Baer's- visit to Grunebaum. Mrs and Dr. Upkom from Boston= Returned to Heidelberg- right glad to feel that I had a home and kind friends to come to. The family were invited out to spend the New Year's eve and I went down to relate my adventures to Arnold and Magrant- In coming back to Heidelberg I exchanged cards of acquaintance with a young man, whose card
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    runs thus- "Freiherr von Sufskind K. Baienicher Cayalleria Offizer." [cavalry officer.] We had a pleasant conversation in the cars; and he hopes to see me in Augsburg. Thursday 1st January 1857 not much done. Freitag 2es Januar.[Friday January 2nd] Marezoll Schillers Leben; einige guten entscheidungen gemacht Bei Mayrant, & Arnold nach tirche. [Marezoll Schiller's Life; some good finding/determinations made at/with Mayrant and Arnold to table/dinner.] Abends= Schiller- Gedichten= hate die kunsller theils gelesen. Herr Staats-Rath Blum za hause. Unterhaltung "ulet die lage der Sachen in der Schweiz uber Russland, Ledheitz- &c &c &c. Ichhabe gestern einen Brief von [In the vening Schiller-poems= have read in part the kunstler (the "artists"--a philosophical poem]. Mr. Privy Councillor Blum at home. COnversation about the state of affairs in Switzerland, about Russia, ? etc. Yesterday I received a letter from]
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    hause empfangen mit datum der 12en Decembers= Samstag 2en Januar=[Saturday January 2nd] Vangerow hat seine vorlesesungen wieder beginnen. Auf dem Museum habe ich die zeitungen gelesen. [Vangerow has begun his lecture/readings again. At the museum I have read the newspapers.] Nachmittag. Etwas von Schiller- auch Ubersetzung aus dem Landprediger von Wakefield. Abends- bei Arnold- mit Mayrant zusammen= nicht zu hause bis 12 uhr. [Afternoon- Something from/by Schiller-also translation from the Vicar of Wakefield. Evening-together at Arnold's, with Mayrant=not home until 12 o'clock.] Sontag: Zeitungen und Schiller. Nachmittag- bei Mayrant- neue Charleston Zeitungen. Abends= Zu hause- Montag- Bei Vangerow. Nochmitty; auf dern Museum Spazier- gang = Brief von Leiberon vater aus Columbia abends zu hause [Sunday: newspapers and Schiller. Afternoon at Mayrant's-new Charleston newspaper. Evening= at home. Monday- At Vangerow's. Afternoon: at the museum stroll= letter from ? father from Columbia. Evening at home.]
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    Dienstagg: Bei Vangerow. Nachmittag= zu hause- Ubersetzung aus dem Land Prediger von Wakefield= Schiller Wilhem Tell. Mohl's Staats- Wissenchaft anfangen. Unterhattung mit der familie= [ Tuesday: at Vangerow's=at home-translation from the Vicar of Wakefield=Schiller Wilhelm Tell. Mohl's Political Science begun. Conversation with the family.] Mittwoch. 7th Januar. Bei Vangerow: zu hause: ? Arbeit. Abends zu jointu. Vannersbourg. Lai Vangerow [Wednesday January 7th. At Vangerow's; at home: ? work. Evening ? at ?] Zaitingow. &c &c. abends bei Arnold, und [illegible] zu Lorisfu. [ ? Evening at Arnold's and ?] Friday 9th= January 1857. Vangerow= &c= Saturday 10th January. Vangerow &c=. Evening at Mayrants. Sunday 11th. Late rising and a slight headache prevented much work. Monday 12th. Vangerow. Letter home to Rose. Mr. Seemuller. Hausser's lecture Tuesday 13th. Vangerow. &c. Dined at the Hollandischer Hof. Evening. Hausser= 4&5- 6&7= Theatre-Hause [is here as?]
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    Gast- and distinguished himself as Narciss. Wednesday. Vangerow. Hausser. Thursday. Vangerow. Hausser- violent headache in the evening. Friday 16th Read over Vangerows lectures- I did not feel well enough to venture out in the snow-storm. Mohl continued the Monograph on Gesellschafts- begriff. Newspapers from Charleston. After dinner 4-5. Hausser- also 6-7. His sketches are naturally comprehensive yet wonderfully free from vague generalities to judge from the impression they leave on my memory. The Lecture between 4-5 is on European History- between 6-7 on German History. At home in the evening. Conversation with the family. Upon the Apprentice-laws of Germany; their evil effect= upon the Bauer-Zustand- its tenacity of old customs. Upon the historical illustrations furnished by the language, and customs of many German villages. On the excess of
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    population in Germany. Query whether this complaint have any foundation in reality? Whether the poverty of Germany does not arise in great part from the bad- government- and from a misarranged "Gesellchaft." Saturday 17th Rose too late to go to Vangerow's first lecture. Read over the notes in my room- and went to the 2nd. After dinner: Read Mohls Monographie on Gesellschaft and finished it. A new subject of thought= or rather a new arrangement of my former thoughts- which always gives an impetus to and sheds a light upon the thoughts themselves. I received a letter from Boyd acknowledging my remittance of 150 Thalers- He seems to have got into Law difficulties; but does not inform me very clearly, of their nature, or extent. I went to the Theatre this evening= to see Hause. The play was stupid, but so much the more merit appeared in the actor- the difficulte vainere -Returned to Arnolds room with Magrant. Supped- and came home at 11[?].
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    Sunday 18th Rose late. Read in Mohl's Staats-wissenchaft [Political Science] until dinner time. After dinner- a walk to the [Molhen/Molken] Cour. The Sun came out for the first time in many days. The Snow was [illegible]. I am invited to a Lese- Abend [reading evening] tomorrow evening at Prof Blums. The reading is to be- Goethe's Clavigo. As I had not read Clavigo before did so this evening. The last two acts are full of power- and betoken the masters hand. The hours between 7-10 of the evening were spent in conversation with the family. Montag 19en Januar. Heute morgen fand ich mich stark erkultet. Schnupfen, und Huste. Musste zu hause bleiben. Las meine noten. Abends obgleich nicht sehr wohl, ging ich [illegible]. Professor Blum. Man las Clavigo. Staats Rath- Clavigo- Sachsse Don Carlos- Thekla Puchelt Marie- Dr. Carius[?] Beaumarchais. [ Monday 19th January. This morning I have a very bad cold. Catarrh and cough. Had to stay at home. Read my notes. In the evening although not very well, I went (to?) Professor Blum. We read Clavigo-Sachesse(?) Don Carlos-Thekla Puchelt Marie- Dr. Carius Beaumarchais.] Dienstag 20th. Schlimmer- naturlich. Zu hause. Las meine noten &c. Briefe von hause bis 30 December. Mein edelmuthiger Vater bietet Boyd alle hulfe an. Der gute- Mag Gott ihn segnen. [Tuesday 20th. Worse-naturally, at home. Read my notes, etc. Letters from home until 30 December. My generous father offers Boyd all assistance. The good man-may God bless him.]
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    doch kein Brief von Eloise, Ellen sagteetwas von einem Misverstandisse mit der familie Payne- sonderbar. Abends- sebn Hlecht- zu hause. Mittwoch Jan 21 Gestern. schrieb Ich an Mutter, Boyd- und H. Bassengeund Sohne-Dresden- Heute bekam ich Den Ring, &c aus Hanau. Ich habe meine Noten gelesen- auch Zeitungen- grammatische Ubungen &c &c. Donneistag. 22 Jan. Zu hause. Briefelvon Sis, und [T...?] Mutter Freitag. 23d Bei Vangerow's [col..?]- Bei Hausen. Samstag 24th. Brief von H Burserge [ink smear] ans Dresden. Schickte 58f nach [ink smear] Abends bei Arnolds. Gaste. Graf--. Graf Schulenberg, von Frankenberg, Sethe, Bendemari, Siegfried, Louisof; und Magrant. Fing heute abend kuno Fischer Geschichte der Philosophie an [still no letter from Eloise, Ellen said something about a misunderstanding with the Payne family-strange evening ? [makes no sense]- at home. Wednesday Jan 21 Yesterday I wrote to mother, Boyd, and H. Bassengeund sons-Dresden. Today I received the ring, etc. from Hanau. I have read my notes-also newspapers-grammatical exercises, etc. Thursday 22 Jan. At home letters from Sis and ? Mother Friday 23rd At Vangerow's ?- At Hausser's ? Saturday 24th. Letter from H. B? from Dresden, sent 58f to ?. Evening at Arnold's. Guests. Count-- Count Schulenberg, Von Frankenberg, Sethe, Bendemari, Siegfried, von Louisof, and Mayrant. Began this evening Kuno Fischer History of Philosophy.]
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    Sonntag 25 January 1857 Stand ziemlich spat auf. Zeitung. Brief an Randolph. Wallenstein. 2e, & 3e= Aufzug= so fern die Scenen zwischen Max, und Thekla bei weitem die besten, die Eindrucksvollsten. Spaziergant mit Mayrant. Zu hause. Grammatische Ubung. Die Stadt war ganz lebhaft, heute Nachmittag. Burchen und Dienst- Madchen Tanz-Musik wieder aufazt Renand ist als Pro Rector bestatight. Montag 26en Januar= [ink smear] Vangerow. &c und Hausser Dienstag 27th &c and Hausser Mitturch 28th &c= " " Donnertag 29th= Gesellschaft bei Puchelts. Freitag. Fackelzug- Kneipe at Bremenech. Samistag. Vangerow- bei Mayrant Abends. Las Hamlet. Sontag 1en February Briefe an Sis- autznur Seemuller= Spaziergang auf der Chaussen Abend zu hause. [Sunday 25 January 1857 Got up pretty late. Newspaper. Letter to Randolph. Wallenstein 2nd & 3rd Act(s)=So far the scenes between Max and Thekla by far the best, the most impressive. Stroll with Mayrant. At home. Grammatical Exercise. The city was very lively this afternoon. Schrubs and servant-girls dancem usic again ?. Renand is confirmed as Pro Rector. Monday 26th January= ? Vangerow etc. and Hausser Tuesday 27th etc. and Hausser Wednesday 28th " " Thursday 29th Party at Puchelts. Friday Torchlight prcession at Bremenech. Saturday Vangerowat Mayrant's in the evening. Read Hamlet. Sunday 1st February Letters to Sis ? Seemuller stroll on the avenue. Evening at home.]
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    Monday Feb 2nd. Vangerow. Hausser. Gesellchaft at home this evening- a poem was read describing Goethe's Egmont- and in the pauses Beethoven's Music to Egmont was given- the songs by Fraulein Therese- the instrumental part= by Frls Marie, & Thekla Puchelt. Mrs Dr. Goldschmidt= Mrs Prof Tuchek von Wien. Tuesday Feb 3d= At Lectures, Evening at home alone studying. Wednesday Feb 4th. Remained at home to read Goethes Faust -which I found him to be too much work for one day. Went to the Theatre in the evening to see the Representation. Haase gave Mephistophales, and the Tanauchek. Grathau. Imperfectly understood, and wretchedly (with the exception of the above named [Ruller?]) put upon the stage- it has made an extraordinary impression upon me. Thursday Feb 5th. At Lectures &c Dr. Haal and Laurie spent the evening with us Friday Feb 6th. At lectures. An exceedingly bad headache in the evening. Saturday Feb 7th At lectures Read and reviewed a portion of Vangerow's
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    notes. Newspapers through the week I have alone diligently studied. In the evening a German lesson, from 8-12 with Arnold, and Magrant- 1st part of Henry 12th (Arnold unfortunately cannot understand German yet) read aloud= altogether not an unprofitable week. The weather has been clear, but very cold. I have been quite well with the exception of a slight cold and cough. On Friday and Saturday, received letters and papers from home- and from Eloise= Sunday 8th Wrote a letter to Henry Young; paid two visits bei Puchelts, bei Blum's. In the afternoon a beautiful walk over the Philosophen Wez- and then to the WolfsBrunnen, where we supped- Returned at 7 PM - a beautiful moonlit night.
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    Monday 9th. Remained at home this morning . Read the notes on this morning's Pandect lecture with what is contained in the Lehrbuch. Finished my review of Pfandrecht= Wrote a letter to Minnie. Read the Independance- and the London Times. Haussers [co...?]. In the evening at home= conversation. I read aloud a portion of Kuno Fischer's work upon Bacon, which as usual led to a long controversy between myself, and the Professor. N. B. When you find the antagonist very warm, you may be sure he thinks your position is quite absurd, and it only bores him for you to continue, or renew your argument. This as a general remark. Tuesday 10th. A busy day; yet not productive of much thought. 9-11, & 12-1: Vangerow. 11-12, the London Times- a striking article on Rich, and poor- another on Cotton- (At dinner- conversation common place. Independance Belge- how corrupt seems French society, but is it not better, than it was 20, 30, 50, 60 years ago? 4-5, 6-7. Hansen's lectures. At home in the evening. Conversation- from 9-11 German Studies.
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    Wednesday 11th. Remained at home. Roman Law. Erbichaft. [appears to be a proper name.] Independance Belge. Reports of insurrection at the South, evidently exaggerated. Walk with Arnold. Hausser 4-5. 6-7: Westminster Review- applauds Fischer's Bacon[?] as the best book on the subject. At home in the evening. German. Weber's History. Wallenstein- continued. Thursday 12th. Remained at home in the morning, employed as yesterday 12-1 by Vangerow. In the afternoon a fine drive- to Scherebringen. [Au...?] 6-7. Family out- study. Friday 13th Bei Vangerow [At Vangerow's] 9-11, 12-1. Museum. 11-12. Inde Belge. Walk. Hausser 4-5- 6-7. Evening with the family. Philosophical discourse with Prof. Wening[?]. Roman Law- and history. Read a portion of Wallenstein. Weather has become mild[?] -still clear.
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    Saturday 14th Feby. Bei Vangerow [at Vangerow's] 9-11, 12-1. Museum. Nachmittag [afternoon]. Walk, and drive. Evening Club. Sunday 15th Morning- Wallenstein 3d part. Evening. The opera at Manheim Robert der Teufel[Devil]. Monday 16th Bei Vangerow. Zeitung. Nachmittag. Bei Hausser. Abends. Deutsche Ubersetzung- und Wallenstein [Mon. 16th At Vangerow's. Newspaper. At Hausser's. Evening. German Translator-and Wallenstein] Wrote to Eloise, to Dr. Mathile, to Mother Tuesday. At home- In the evening a small party at the Staats Rath, Blum. I was so unwell that I was obliged to leave early in the evening. Wednesday 18th. At home in the morning. In the Evening- the Mask Ball at the Museum- I went in Domino[?]- but retired early. Thursday 19th= At home- Friday 20th= At lectures again- at home in the evening. Saturday 21st= At lectures- received a letter from Charles Boyd. Robert has been ill, but is better- Received a letter from Joe 16th Janr.
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    Sunday 22nd Feby. Wrote to Mr. Mourge Sr (enclosing Courier with Dr. Dinants paper on the cotton-trade. Wrote to Charles Boyd. Attended to some miscellaneous matters- Monday 23d. Vangerow- has added three quarters of an hour to his collegium; it consequently takes up the whole morning. I received letters from Boyd Jan 16. Alas, what a noble, and what an affected spirit. Would I could have been with him.-- also from Randolph and Sis to the 18th & 21st of January. Hausser 4-5= 6-7. Both remarkable creatures. Tuesday 24th. Vangerow in the forenoon. . German lesson 2-3. Tarz-stunde 3-4. Hausser 4-5- N.Y Herald 5-6 Hausser 6-7. At home in the evening. These have been the last two days of the Carnival, and the children have amused themselves by parading about the streets in fancy dresses the objects of admiration, and envy to those who were not rich enough to do the same.
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    Wednesday 25th Ash Wednesday. Vangerow as usual and Hausser. Newspaper. Evening with the family. Escorted Frl Marie Puchelt home-- Thursday 26th Bei Vangerow Bei Hausser. Abends in Theater. Benefiz der Rueff- [Thurs. 26th. At Vangerow's. At Hausser's. Evening at the theater. Benefit ?] Received a letter from Randolph Feb 7th. He speaks discontentedly of his social position in Charleston and with season- with a thoughtlessness however, which smacks of yet immature judgement, he talks of a shady removal. "Stave di sotto", I too, was unprepared for- yet even this would I suffer, than sacrifice the happiness of--.
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    Feb 28th Bei Vangerow- and Hausser. Tanz (unterricht?) Tanz Stunden 7-9 (?)[At Vangerow's. and Hausser's. Dance (instruction?) Dance lessons. 7-9?] Arnolds Room. Home at 11. Feb 28th Bei Vangerow commenced the law of obligations. Hausser 6-7. A glorious day. Schloss[?] in the afternoon- most beautiful. With Arnold in the evening. March 1st Engaged in the morning in making up my accounts &c &c. In the afternoon, after reading the newspapers I took a walk with Arnold, and Jrisson[?] to Neuhof- beautiful weather- extraordinarily mild. Returned home -tea with the family-- wrote a letter to Father- and a letter to Middleton- March 2nd= Bei Vangerow- & Hausser [at Vangerow's-& Hausser's.] Evening at Prof Blums Lese-Kranzchen.[Reading circle.] Two scenes from Faust. March 3d- Bai Vangerow & Hausser[At Vangerow's & Hausser's]- In the afternoon a walk to the Molhen-Cour- a heavenly day- Thermometer at 60. Read an answer from M. Mourge Evening with the family.
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    March 4th Vangerow from 9 to 1/2 11- from 12 to 1/2 1 (!!). Dined at the Hollandisch Hof= Hausser from 4-5= Fencing master 5-6. Hausser from 6-7. Went to the Prussian Kneipe- drearily dully- and noisy nuissance! I wonder how the young men are capable of such things. March 5th. Blessed the men who (with an active mind) have leisure hours. 9 to 1/2 11. Vangerow- 1/2 11 to 3/4 1 Vangerow. 3-4 dancing (Pfaff and Veoner)(!). from 4-5 Hausser= 5-6. Fencing master- 6-7 Hausser- 7- to 10. Evening at home- Herr Homburger from Marz[?]. Newspapers form Charleston nothing of importance- Independance Belge ditto. Thus has the day ran round from 7 to 1/2 11. March 11th Vangerow. Hausser. I gave a small supper party to Von Wedell, and Graf Schulenburg. Rather more rational than a Kneipe[Tavern or Student's club].
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    List of Engravings &c Dresden [far right: [illegible] Thalers. 16] The Madonna di San Sisto sz. [^] size 24=16 and other pictures in Steel; and Lithograph best at Arnolds Schloss-gasse near the Alt-Muht. "Dresden Gallery" at Payne. New Makt. 11 Thr. March 7th Vangerow- and Hausser. Mitteronarius' closing lecture on Criminal [illegible]= eloquent- moving. England, Scotland, and America have infinitely the best system- yet by no means free from faults. Evening at Arnolds room. Received a letter from home Feb 12th; from Minni & Father. Took a fencing lesson. March 8th Wrote a letter to Father on what I had accomplished in Europe and I meant to do. Read Schiller- arranged what had become disordered in the course of the week. Kranzchen at the dancing-school. Margasthe V----. her childlike simplicity and innocence. Pfaner----. &c &c
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    March 9th Vangerow the whool forenoon= Hausser the afternoon March 10th ditto March 11th " March 12th: Unwell. remained at home= Letters from Charleston to 20th= of Feby, from Boyd in reference to Charles Feb 9th. Charleston papers= from Nach. Read Dumas' new comedy "Question d'Argent"- little wit, little originality, excites no emotion strongly enough to render it interesting= March 13th. Mailed a letter to Charles Boyd. Vangerow (who read 5 hours to day. Hausser (3 hours). Remained with Arnold in the evening. He has been quite unwell for a day or so. Read in Schiller before going to bed; but I am always so captivated by his lyric muse that I cannot sleep easily afterwards March 14th The last day. (of the Semestere! Vangerow 6 hours. Concluded with the expression of his conviction that a study of the Digest was the condition of a good Jurist - whether the Roman Law prevailed in a particular land, or not-
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    Hausser concluded with an admirable and statesmanlike survey of his course= Like a good patriot he does not despair of his country= The [illegible] point of German History is 1806. The decline may be dated 1648. From 1648 to 1856 in modern German History. From 1806 to 56 development- progress, though not always in a straight line. By no means contented with the present condition of things. Remained an hour, or so with Arnold. The long confinement to one lecture room gave me a severe headache-
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    I humbly and solemnly thank God, that he has permitted me in health and strength to pursue my studies during this semester. I pray that the fruits of these efforts may not be useless- and that I may continue them with a continuance of his blessing, and with more earnestness, and singleness of purpose
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    Scheer 1st lesson 1/2 hour Sept 2nd " 1 hour Sep 3d " 1 hour Oct 1st
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    Sep 28th 1856. A record; for reference - guidance Dresden Sep 28th. My lodgings (2. rooms Parterre) cost me service incd. 16 Thrs per month. My dinner varies or has varied during my confinement and my rooms between 5 & 6 gr. Coffee--. Tea- Washing about 1.15 Thr a week Guide Book to Central Italy $3.50. Tiarbi[?] German Exercises-- 1. 10. Washing-- 18.6. Dinner 6 Postage 4---.10 Sep 29 Carriage line-- 2 .15 [illegible]---8. 30th Ink 2. Carriage 19. grapes. .21 Oct 1st carriage 10. Ida & Herman trink gold 15. Picture gallery 5 grapes .23 Dinner these 3 days---1. 6. Soap, Perfume, &c: [Sur...?] 1.- Mrs von A's Bill for the past month 15.00 Advanced for the next month 16.00 Oct 2nd. Carriage 10. Driver 16. "Hends' Telegraph" 9. Servant for waiting on me driving the past month 1.10. } 2. 15. 3d. Dinner 12 4th Diner 11 1/2 gr. coffee and cigars 3 1/2 visit to the Japanese Palace and Library 12 1/2 cab 5 1. 1 1/2 5th Washing 15 1/2. [illegible] and cigars 24 cab 5 1. 14 1/2 6th Postage 16 gr: Excursion to Saxon Switz. 1. 17 1/2 Theatre; and coach here. 1. 22 7th Meissen China 6.13 Dinner 25. [Su...?] 1. coach 7 7. 16
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    9th 10 11 12} Prague Expenses personal $18.00 Bought of Bohemian glass. $25.50 freight and [d...?] 1.00. Music 1.50. 13th Bought of Payne (engravings) This; 4.00 " " Arnold " " ; 22.00 coach. dinner 1. 1.12 Paid Adler and Dielze for book 12.00. 14th Purchased Music---9.00. Drosche and dinner &c---1.05 Sponge & bag, & gloves---2. 07 Dr. Walter's Bill---25. 00 Dr. Leonardis " 25.00. Independence Belge= (altogether) newly[?] 7.00 Toys for Baby 2 Ths; Tailor's Bill 44 46.00 Dinner and [leizure?] 1. Drosche 15 gr 1.15 15th Packing case 3 Ks; Droschse: 1. 4.00 Trinkgeld to shudchen and House Mill 4. 10. Apothecary 3. Dusche and trinkgeld and bath= and dinner 5.25 16th Ticket to Heidelberg 14.00 Road expenses: 1.15 17th Bill at Prince Carl. 3.00 15th Theatre 1. and dusche 12 1.15 extras .17 [subtotal] 193.00 add for the reduction of American [dollrs?] 62.00 [total] 255.00 transport[?] 5. 00 250. 00
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    Heidelberg Florins [illegible] Oct 20th: Ta. Freight on luggage 7. 15. " Theatre and cigars 5. 30. " Museum Subscription 10. 00. " Music at Museum 1. 00. " Postage &c 1. 00. " 1. 49.
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    Oct 6th Meissen China. a Cup 3.27 a Pipe 2.15 Thrs 6. 13
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    D. H. M Dr. in a/c to July 24th 2000 francs August 6th 1000 francs Oct 7th 750 20th 700 francs [pounds symbol]10.00. Oct 28th cashed my draft in favor of Hammond[?] 2.50 francs (250) Dec 10th 700 350 guldens to July 24th 2000 francs August 6th 1000 fr Oct 7th 756.75 fr Oct 20th 750 fr Oct 28th 250.65 fr Hammond. Draft Dec 10 752.70 Dec 29th or 150 guldens Jan 9th 350 guldens March 5th 350 ""
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    Grunebaum & [illegible] Cr. June 16th 7000 francs.
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    Thermometer at Ems. Observations taken from a room fronting North- on the left bank of the Lahn= 5 A.M. 9AM. 3 PM. 10PM July 12th [9AM] 13:9. July 13th [9AM] 14 14th [9AM] 14 15th ["] 14.9. 16th ["] 15 17th ["] 15 1/2 18th ["] 15 19th ["] 15 1/2
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    Memorandum of letters written. Wrote to Eloise: Monday June 30 " Mother & Rose " " " " to Middleton & Boyd June 28 " to Robert Boyd. July 3d " " Mess Grunebaum & Ballin " " " " Rach. Paris June 23d " " Rosengarten July 5th " and mailed daguerrotype to Superintent Sachtleben[?]- " July 7th Home= and to Rach July 10th Gourdin Lennig July 14th Home Father, Mother and Ellen Miss Eloise; and [f...?] [liste?] July 18th Joe 21st Home. Minnie. 26th Mr. Lennig 27th Rosengarten, and Boyd 28th Tosh, and Father. Eloise.
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    Letters to be written 1. Home on Monday July 6th 2. Rach 3. Eloise 4. Boyd R 5. Gaillard 6. Gourdin 7. Ballin & Grunebaum 8. Lennig 9. Hammond 10. Young 11. Rosengarten 12 Barker 13 Stuart 14. Middleton 15 C. Boyd 16. Dr. Mathile 17 Messrs Mourgue Freres
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    2 Candles: July 1st supper= tea and two eggs. Breakfast July 2nd " " " Breakfast July 3d. tea at Kursaal. " July 4th: ---" and two eggs tea July 5th Breakfast and tea- both with eggs. = B + 2 e. T+ 2 e. 6th " " " - 7th " " } Bottle Seltzer 8th " " }[7th and 8th] at Kursaal 9th " " 2 candles and bottle Selzer. 10th 11th 12th }[10th-12th] Br + 2 e /Tea at Kursaal 13th " " "} Tea alone here. 14th " " " " 2 candles 15 " " " " " 16th " " compote 17th " " Tea at Kursaal= 18th " " " 19th " " 2 candles Tea and eggs here 24 amount of Bill at Villa Balzer. 55 Thr 14 silver gr Dr. Vogler 60 Francs. D -
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    Memoranda of Expenses on Thursday Evening June 26th I came to the Villa Balzar- I occupied the lower room in the basement until the evening of Tuesday (5 days) at the rate of 1 Thaler per diem); and burned two wax candles- memorandum of meals may be found in my small memorandum book. Tuesday July 1st= Came to this room under the following agreement= room 3 Thr. & 10 gr per diem Breakfast (bread and coffee) 8 gr tea ( " " ) 8 gr eggs each 1 gr. mutton [cutlets?] &c to be obtained from the hotels at hotel prices= Service for the madchen 2 1/2 gr per diem= to the Sommelier-- a gratuity= candles each ___
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    July 2nd: dinner 1 fl 2 suspensoria[?] 1 Thr graving[?] name on cup 18 krs dinner 1 fl. 12 kr 5 gr Music___2 fl Supper___54 kr Boots___10 fl pd July 9th postage 4 kr to Frankfurt double letter to Boyd 47 kr } 51 kr July 4th postage 22 [?] --22 kr dinner- 1. 12 gloves 2 gr 15 silver gr July 5th Washing 3 florins [illegible] 5 Silver gr July 6th grc coffee[?] 12 kr 2 fremde list[?] July 7th Avmen-bad 2 florins half bottle medoc 38 kr dinner 1 fl postage 1 " tea at Kursaal 30 kr July 8th dinner- 1 fl 18 [fremde list?] 6 kr July 9th dinner and tea at Kursaal. 3 florins= July 10th Carriage &c Say[?] 3 florins=
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    Saisse touching the Canon Law; and its sources=
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    Dr. Schupler's lessons July 1st July 7th July 11th July 14th [Tary master Zimmerman?] commenced= Friday Feb 20th commenced daily [illegible] (Tuesday Feb 24th omitted by Zimmermans request)
Title:
David Henry Mordecai Travel Diary (1856-57)
Creator:
Mordecai, David Henry
Date:
1856-1857
Description:
Record of David Henry Mordecai's illnesses and schooling, mostly in Heidelberg, Germany, with some notations at Ems. With sporadic notations of weather, and mentions of South Carolinians Albert Rhett, William, John & Alfred Preston, Charles Boyd, Hammond, Legare, D.C. Seixas & others. References to museums, artwork and plays seen. Mentions of health and cures, the need for an operation (p. 73); stupidity of peasants vs. slaves (18); lynching (21), political situation in Kansas (30); doomed nature of American slavery (31); inevitability of Civil War (31-2); state support of SC College (56-57); women who "paint" their faces (111). With constant references to family, and some financial jottings. Some entries in German.
Collection:
Thomas J. Tobias papers, ca. 1790-1970
Contributing Institution:
College of Charleston Libraries
Media Type:
Manuscripts
Personal or Corporate Subject:
Mordecai family
Topical Subject:
Jews--South Carolina--Charleston--History, Travelers--Diaries, Travelers--Germany--History--19th century
Geographic Subject:
Germany--Commerce--History--19th century, Germany--Economic conditions--19th century, Germany--History--1848-1870, Germany--Description and travel, Germany--Archival resources
Language:
English
Shelving Locator:
Mss 1029 (5A/13)
Material Type:
image/jpeg
Digitization Specifications:
400ppi, 24-bit depth, color, Epson Expression 10000XL, Archival Masters are tiffs.
Copyright Status Statement:
Public Domain.
Access Information:
For more information contact Special Collections, College of Charleston Libraries, Charleston, SC 29424.