A Walk Around Ye Olde Charleston

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    Oyez-oyez! Know all men that ye be welcomed most kindlie - To our own City Published by Lanneau's Art Store Charleston, S.C.
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    THE CITY OF CHARLESTON was incorporated in 1783, with its boundary at the present Calhoun Street. The confines of the old city limits hold much of history that is of more than passing interest to the stranger. Since 1783 its corporate limits have several times been extended, and they now embrace much territory which in former times was regarded as country. Hartwell Ayer has well expressed the stamp which Colonial days put upon succeeding generations. He says of the early history of South Carolina: "As the characteristics of the first settlers of the new country put a stamp upon succeeding generations, the South Carolinian claims as his birthright a love of truth and honor, a devotion to woman, and a respect for the laws of God and man, and above all a liberty of thought and action." The early settlers of Carolina were noble English gentlemen. Then came the sturdy French Huguenots and the home-loving Germans; later the Emerald Isle gave some of her purest and best flowers of chivalry to bloom in this new land. These then, with the Quakers and the Canadian Arcadians, constitute the first settlers of our city. That Charleston still retains her characteristics gathered from the first settlement will be seen from the following opinion pronounced by George Kennan, the noted traveller, as he viewed the older portion of the town upon the occasion of a visit to St. Michael's steeple. He said: "Had I closed my eyes and been transported here, I would without doubt think, while gazing round at this quaint older portion of your city, with its tiled roofs, Spanish-looking verandahs and high walls enclosing the verdant gardens, that I had been suddenly carried into some old, walled city of Europe." Charleston was first settled at Albemarle Point, at the confluence of Ashley River and Wappoo Creek, under Governor William Seyle in 1670. In 1672, for purposes of commerce, the settlement was moved to Oyster Point, which occupied the peninsula and point formed by the junction of Etiwan and Kiawah Rivers, now the Cooper and Ashley respectively. The ancient city bounds were laid out to occupy space now enclosed by the following streets --Meeting on the West, Water on the South, Market on the North, and the Bay on the East. The old town was fortified. Walls, moat and a drawbridge constituted the town's defence against Indians on land, and Spaniards and pirates by sea. Granville's Bastian stood at the present East Battery, and Craven's Bastion, which stood at the opposite end of the fortifications, was just below the present Market Street, near the present Custom House Wharf. (Picture of U. S. Custom House.) The drawbridge was near the present intersection of Broad and Meeting Streets, and we read in the old papers that some one of that day objected to Governor Glen placing guards at the city gates "to prevent idle persons from going a-pleasuring on Sundays." St. Michael's stands today on the former site of St. Philip's Church, called The English Church--the first Episcopal Church in South Carolina. St. Michael's is possessed of the greatest interest for home folks and visitors alike, as it is the centre, so to speak, of historical associations of the city. Its spire, with the far-famed and much travelled set of chimes, is a famous landmark, as Mrs. Stansberry says in her poem "How He Saved St. Michael's" (The story of the slave who risked his life and gained his freedom by saving the church from fire) ; it is the "first glimpse of home to the sailor, and last to the outward bound." The corner stone of the present building was laid Feb. 17, 1752, and the church first opened for divine worship Feb. 1, 1761. In 1764 the bells and the clock were imported from England, and the organ (the remains of which are incorporated into the present organ) brought over in 1 768. The history of the bells has been told again and again. They were seized in 1 782 by Major Traile of the Royal Artillery, and shipped to England, where they were sold. They were purchased by Mr. Rhyner, a former Charleston merchant, and by him reshipped to Charleston, and rehung in St. Michael's Steeple. In 1861 they were moved to Columbia for safe keeping, but were so injured by the fire that then destroyed Columbia as to be entirely useless. In 1866 the remains were gathered together, and again shipped to England, where they were recast in the same moulds as the original bells, and in 1867 the bells were again rehung in Charleston. It is said the first sound the bells gave after coming back was when the old bell-ringer played "Home again, home again, from a foreign shore," and "they say" that there was hardly a citizen of Charleston but that paid this lovely greeting the tribute of a tear. The only authentic historical usage still
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    observed with the bells is the bell tolled for fifteen minutes before service, and called "the parson's bell." In the Church building itself many historic treasures are to be found, and bits of local history of great value are found on the inscriptions of many of the tombs incorporated in the Church walls. In the Churchyard itself there are many more, including Petigru, Robert Y. Hayne, John Rutledge, the first Chief Justice of the United States, and Dictator of South Carolina. The Church is always open to visitors, and the treasures of the edifice, as well as its beauties, amply explained by the accommodating verger. He takes great pride in pointing out the memorial tablet to Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, author of the famous sentiment "Millions for defence, but not one cent for tribute." Picture of St. Michael's Church.) Opposite to St. Michael's, at the Northeast corner of Meeting and Broad, where now stands the City Hall, a market formerly stood as late as 1739. This market was called "A market in the parish of St. Philip's"--a market in earlier times stood at the East end of Tradd Street, and a little later on Vendue Range, so that we see that our present Central Market is of comparatively recent date, having been built somewhere between 1 788 and 1804. (See picture of Central Market.) The City Hall, which now occupies the site of the market of 1 739, was constructed early in 1800 for a branch of the U. S. Bank. It was conveyed to the city in 1818, and late in the last century it was thoroughly renovated and put in its present form. In this building are many valuable relics, such as Trumbull's portrait of Washington, Fraser's miniature of Lafayette, Beauregard's sword, and other relics of priceless value to the city and of great interest to visitors, who are always welcome. On the Southwest corner of Broad and Meeting, where now stands the U. S. Post Office, once stood the Arsenal, called the Guard House, with a branch or "picquet guard house" on the "Green" near the corner of King and Calhoun Streets. In slavery times bells were rung as a signal for changing of guards. It became a kind of curfew for the slaves. It was against the rule for a negro to be on the streets after the ringing of the nine o'clock bell. A little jingle in the negro dialect says: "The bell done ring, the drum done beat, And I, in ma lady garden," showing that the signal of the nine o'clock bell and the drum beat from the guard house, which was originally intended for a police signal, finally became the sign that the negroes must be in the owner's yard at this hour. If one staid out too late they had a little song about the patrol: "Run, nigger, run, the patterroll ketch you." Leaving St. Michael's Church, and turning South, you will find on the left hand side, St. Michael's Alley, quite a historic spot. Once it was the site of law offices of men like Petigru and other noted legal lights, now given over to negro dwellings. Where once the voice of the law rung forth in well turned oratory now is heard the cries of the children at play, or the croon of a "Mammy" as she hushes her pickaninny to rest. (Picture of St. Michael's Alley.) The South Carolina Hall stands on the left hand side of Meeting Street, going South. The South Carolina Society grew Gut of the old "Two Bit" Club, which was established in 1 736. It resolved itself into the South Carolina Society in 1799, and in 1804 the Society held its first meeting under its own roof. (Pic- lure of S. C. Hall.) At the Northwest corner of Tradd and Meeting Streets stands the house with its piazza over the street. This house goes back to Revolutionary times, and is known to history as the "Horry house." On the opposite, or Southwest corner stands the recent Scotch Presbyterian Church, which congregation was established as early as 1 732, and called the First Presbyterian Church. (Picture of Scotch Presbyterian Church.) (Picture of Horry House.) Continuing South on Meeting Street, at No. 34, the present Huger residence, we come to a house of great interest from the fact that here resided the last Colonial Governor, Lord Campbell. Lord Campbell is said to have left hurriedly from the rear of his residence, and entering a rowboat, lying in a creek in the present Water Street, he was rowed out to a British man of war in the harbor, one of Sir Peter Parker's fleet. It was said he was fleeing from debt, and that all of his belongings, even to the family coach, were sold to satisfy his creditors. Lord William Campbell not only married a daughter of one of the most prominent and wealthy planters of South Carolina, but the eventual cause of his death was due to wounds received under the guns of Fort Moultrie on the occasion of the famous attack by the combined land and naval forces of Sir Peter Parker and Sir Henry Clinton. It has been suggested that a memorial be
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    erected in his honor, in Charleston, as the last representative of the royal government in the Colony of South Carolina. The only objection that can be urged to this interesting move is that he did not espouse the cause of the American Revolution. Another item of interest concerning the Huger house is that during the earthquake a brick became dislodged from this structure, and in falling caused the death of an Englishman who was passing. (Picture of Huger House.) The Patrick Calhoun residence, No. 14 Meeting Street, stands on the former site of the Lowndes residence, a picture of which along with other valuable mementoes of the Lowndes family will be found in a case in the rotunda of the Gibbes Art Gallery. Retracing our steps towards Water Street, you go Eastward to the present Church Street, at which point a bridge formerly stood. Church Street was considered the elegant residential section of old Charleston, and one may fancy processions of beaux and belles promenading its narrow sidewalks, or issuing from its dusky doorways. Near the corner of Stoll's Alley, in which alley resided Peter Trezevant, was the old site of the Mariner's Church, towards the maintenance of which Jennie Lind, the celebrated singer, once contributed $500. (Picture of Stoll's Alley.) In 1699 the First Baptist Church was established in this neighborhood. (Picture of First Baptist Church.) Proceeding Northward, we will come to Landgrave Smith's residence, which stood somewhere in this vicinity. In his garden in the present Longitude Lane it is said the first rice planted in South Carolina was raised in 1694 by Landgrave Smith. The title Landgrave is one of the three orders of nobility of that day, there being Barons, Cassiques and Landgraves. (Picture of Longitude Lane.) Leaving Landgrave Smith, we come to Tradd Street, formerly the chief shopping street of the young colony and named for the first male child born in the Colony, Robert Tradd. In its narrow confines and dingy little shops were to be had goods from all over the world. There stood as late as 1820 a hostelry, known as the Carolina Coffee House. This hostelry stood near Bedon's Alley, and this Alley still retains, along with Elliott Street, its quaint look and historic atmosphere. Crossing Tradd Street, and travelling North, on the right hand side, is Mr. Fuseler's bakery, formerly Judge Heyward's town residence, where George Washington was entertained in 1791. Mr. Fuseler has made an effort to preserve the room intact in which Washington slept. Continuing North in Church Street, and crossing Broad, we come to the present Library building at the Northwest corner of Broad and Church. As early as 1700 an Act was issued for the Provincial Library, and in 1 743 Charleston had the first Circulating Library. This building was formerly occupied by the South Carolina Bank. In October, 1802, a man named Withers and his accomplice were defeated in an attempt to rob the bank by tunneling under the vaults. As the process of tunneling had been in progress three months when discovered, this episode is known in history as the "Ground Mole Plot". The present dilapidated building, standing at the Southwest corner of Queen and Church, and known as the Planter's Hotel (so called from the fact that planters from all over the State were wont to resort thither) was once the scene of stirring activity, and in former days stages for Savannah, Augusta and the West had their starting point from this now deserted place. This building is situated in the site of the first theatre building in America, it is claimed; records running as far back as 1 731 seem to substantiate this when Queen Street was called Dock Street. (Picture of Planter's Hotel.) Opposite to the Planter's Hotel stands the only active Huguenot Church of America. This is the third building to occupy this site, the two previous edifices having been destroyed by fire. This History of the Huguenot Church is supposed to be coeval with that of the Colony, it being supposed to own its origin to a colony of French Protestants sent out to Carolina in 1680 by Charles II. of England, for the purpose of introducing the culture of silk, olives and the vine. Their expectations were not successfully realized, but the Church was strengthened by those Huguenots who fled from France in 1685, to escape persecution after the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes. The first authorized pastor of this Church was Elias Prioleau, who came from France in 1687 to minister to this Church. It is of more than passing interest to note that Elias Prioleau was the grandson of Antoine Prioli, "Doge of Venice," who died in 1623. (Picture of Huguenot Church.) Although the Huguenots were of co-ordinate date with the settling of the Colony, those of other faiths are of almost equal antiquity. As early as 1 740 there were enough of the Jewish faith to form a congregation, the Quakers had a meeting house on King
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    Street near Broad on "Archdale Square" (138 King Street), and in 1786 the first Mass was celebrated in Charleston for the Roman Catholics by an Italian priest, so that we see that religion has always prospered in Charleston. Continuing North on Church Street we come to St. Philip's Church, almost as well known and equally well loved as St. Michael's. It also holds relics of great value to community history, among others of supreme interest the sarcophagus of Calhoun. This stands in the Western cemetery, across the street from the Church, while the slab which originally covered his grave is incorporated into the outside walls of the present Sunday School building. Another grave stone of interest is the one that marks the spot where is buried Nicholas John Wightman, who was killed by a footpad on the night of March 12th, 1 788. The tomb and its interesting inscription may be seen from the street. Divine Providence so ordered it that a single button found on the spot where the murder was committed served with other proofs to discover and convict "the villain." (Picture of St. Philip's Church.) Colonial Powder Magazine. The first mention that we have of the Power Magazine is in 1704 when the general assembly of the province voted a sum of money for a building on the present site. At the time of the Revolutionary War the public records pronounced the Magazine unsafe and in consequence the stores of powder were removed. The building was abandoned for years, and then used successively as a blacksmith's shop; then (divided by a brick wall) as a wine bin; after that as a stable. It was in this last condition in 1902 when bought by the South Carolina Society of the Colonial Dames of America, through the efforts of Mrs. E. H. Pringle, at that time the President of the South Carolina Society. The brick division was taken down, the tiled roof repaired, the door replaced and window panes put into the casements, a wooden floor laid and the Magazine was ready to be occupied. It serves as a meeting place for the society and has been the centre of many pleasant entertainments to distinguished guests. An iron fence was added soon after and a pleasant garden of old fashioned flowers, and a tiled floor replaced the wooden one. Gifts and loans consisting of handsome old chairs, a Chippendale secretary, a brocade silk gown made of the first silk of the Colony, engravings of the four South Carolina signers, old lace, maps, books, letters, etc., lend an added interest to the visitors and to the members of the society. (Picture of Powder Magazine.) Continuing West on Cumberland we come to Meeting Street, so called from the number of Meeting Houses, or Churches, thereon placed. Turning South on Meeting, upon the left hand side, stands the Circular Church, congregation organized in 1690. After many heroic struggles and kindly courtesies extended to others of alien faith, and after many vicissitudes, a building was erected in 1806, minus the steeple; an ancient doggerel verse says: "Charleston was a righteous place Full of righteous people, Build a Church in Meeting Street, And could not build the steeple. David Ramsay, foolish man, To build a church on such a plan." The steeple was added in 1838, but that structure was also destroyed by fire, and the present building of comparatively recent date erected. The Ordinance of Secession was signed in a hall, which stood next South of the Circular Church, which was also destroyed by fire. This hall was known as The South Carolina Institute Hall. The Gibbes Art Gallery, completed in 1904, stands on the site of the Grand Opera House, remodeled from the Agricultural Hall. At the Southwest corner of Queen and Meeting Streets stands the St. John Hotel, a most modern and up-to-date hotel, which retains, however, a flavor of bygone days in its enclosed courtyard. In former days this was called the Mills House, and an old rhyme has it that the Mills House was built to accommodate those who could not afford to pay the steep prices of the Charleston Hotel. "If you want to cut a dash And have not got the cash You may go To the Mills House, O!" South of the St. John Hotel stands the Hibernian Hall, erected by the Hibernian Society, which dates as far back as 1799; besides being of great intrinsic interest, this building is of interest to the traveller as being the place where are conducted the famous St. (Continued in rear of book).
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    U. S. CUSTOM HOUSE
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    CENTRAL MARKET
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    ST. MICHAEL'S ALLEY
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    SCOTCH PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
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    HORRY HOUSE
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    THE HUGER HOUSE
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    FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
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    LONGITUDE LANE
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    THE SMYTHE GATEWAY
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    EAST BATTERY
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    FRENCH COFFEE HOUSE AND OLD POST OFFICE OR EXCHANGE
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    THE RIGGS' RESIDENCE
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    CAPTAIN F. W. WAGENER'S COUNTRY RESIDENCE
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    COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON
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    Cecilia Balls. The Hibernian Hall fronts Chalmers Street, about two squares down which, between Church and State Streets, the old Slave market stood, and now stands in modified form. (Picture of Slave Market.) Opposite the Hibernian Hall, on the corner of Chalmers and Meeting Streets, stands the Fire Proof Building, where are kept all the valuable records of the County. This building looks out over Washington Square, which was renovated in 1880. A statue of William Pitt, first Earl of Chatham, was then removed from the grounds of the Orphan House, and re-erected here. In this little park stands also the obelisk dedicated to the memory of the Washington Light Infantry. Also the Beauregard monument, and the Timrod memorial bust. Two doors East on Broad stands the entrance to the Confederate Home College, once the old South Carolina Hotel. We again find ourselves near the corner of Broad and Meeting Streets, and have traversed in our travels, only a small portion of the Eastern lower portion of the town. To make a fresh start and going Westward along Broad Street, the first building of public interest is the Cathedral of St. John, only recently re-erected in exact duplicate of the former Cathedral, which was destroyed here by fire. As late as 1812 Savage Street, known as Savage Green, was the Western border of the town. In a vacant lot at the corner of New and Broad Streets stood the old theatre, and in the same quarter of the town is to be found the Medical College, Old Roper Hospital (now the Marlboro apartments), at the corner of Queen and Logan. Vaux Hall Gardens, the Marine Hospital, and the old Sugar, or Work House, stood in this vicinity. At the corner of Queen around the corner may be seen in Archdale Street the turrets of the and Legare (then Friend Street) also stood the old circus, and Unitarian Church, established in 1817, and St. John's Lutheran Church, the first edifice of which was known as Bachman's Church, and was a quaint old building, erected in 1 764. The pastor of this church, Rev. John Bachmann, D.D., L.L. D., who was born in Rhinebeck, Dutchess County, State of New York, in 1790 and died in this city in 1874, was distinguished in science, eminent for piety, bravery and faithful devotion to God and his Church, as is set forth on his monument. From all accounts Dr. Bachman seems to have been "God's good man," who carried strength and healing in his passage. He seems also to have fulfilled an almost apostolic mission in regard to the Lutheran faith in the South, and his memory is justly held in loving remembrance. Turning down from Archdale into Legare Street (then Friend) and passing the Academy of our Lady of Mercy, continuing South on Legare, crossing Broad, we find ourselves in the exclusive residential section of Charleston. Especially is this true of that portion of Legare Street below Tradd,--notice its quaint- ness, the beauty of its buildings and their environments, and you will not be surprised that this is accounted one of the most characteristic streets of Charleston. There you find the Simonton Gateway, with its accompanying high walls; the Whaley residence, and Mr. Augustine Smythe's home, which possesses a peculiar charm indescribable, but typical of Charleston. On the opposite side of the Street the gateway of the residence of Mr. J. A. Smyth is possessed of peculiar interest because half of the elaborate scroll work on the gate is of iron, and some is of wood. It would take very close examination to tell which is which. (See pictures of Smythe and Simonton Gateways.) Adjoining this property, but fronting on King Street, stands the Pringle house, known in history as the Miles Brewton House, which property formerly ran from King to Legare. Every brick in this building was brought from England, the stairways and wainscoting of the interior are of mahogany. The chandelier in the drawing room is of solid crystal, and illumines a room furnished in Louis XV. style. Apart from the purity of the type, and the value of the contents this building is of peculiar interest, as it was occupied as headquarters by the Commander of every invading army which ever came to Charleston. On a crisp frosty night, even yet, one may dream that the dim paved courtyard is astir with ghostly soldiers, or fancy may catch an echo of "Halt, who goes there?" from a tongue long silent in death. (Picture of Pringle House.) Turning South on King, and walking about a block, we come to the Battery, formerly White Point Gardens. This garden spot of our city contains much of general interest. The Jasper monument, the Phosphate monument, the old guns from the Keokuk, all are of value and historic interest. But the chiefest interest centres around the drinking fountain, which stands at the foot of Meeting Street, and was erected "In memory of the supreme devotion of those heroic men of the Confederate Army and Navy, first in Marine Warefare to employ submarine boats, 1863-1865. Moved by the
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    lofty faith that with them died, crew after crew volunteered for enterprises of extremest peril in the defence of Charleston Harbor. Of more than thirty men drowned in this desperate service, the names of but sixteen are known." The Battery has been the scene of many brilliant assemblies, none more so that when Princess Louise and her brilliant cortege embarked from the Western portion of South Battery in 1883. The only memento of her visit was obliterated when the shifting sands of the Boulevard covered up the steps used by her in her royal progress. White Point Gardens are called the Battery because in 1700 those fortifications known as Broughton's Battery stood there. At the intersection of South and East Battery an extensive view of the Harbor unfolds itself. Tradition has it that in 1718 Capt. Stede Bonnet and eleven of his crew of pirates were here hung, and buried each with a stake in his heart. (Picture of Battery.) In viewing the panorama of the harbor the first point that strikes our eye to the right is James Island, and a point of Morris Island. We see where the first fortification erected for the defence of this harbor at the Northeast point of James Island stood. It was called Fort Johnson, as it was erected and named for "Nathaniel Johnson, Knight," Governor of Carolina under the Proprietary Government. From this fort in Revolutionary times there sallied forth a small but determined band of men who anticipated the Boston Tea Party by a few months in compelling a British ship which had on board the hated stamp paper, to leave the harbor. During the Civil War Commings Point was occupied by Battery Wagner, and when the Federals finally gained possession it was from this vicinity that the Swamp Angel bombarded the city five miles away. Fort Ripley is now a light house, and Castle Pinckney, built on Schulte's Folly, although it played an unimportant part in the recent war, was considered the most important fortification in the harbor in 1809, as Fort Sumter was not planned until 1825. Still viewing the panorama of the harbor we see in the middle distance that fort of supreme interest, Fort Sumter, and in the offing may be discerned Sullivan's Island, upon which stands historic Fort Moultrie, and the tragic grave of Osceola, telling of the dramatic story of his capture by treachery and imprisonment at Fort Moultrie. A parting glance to the left of the harbor reveals Morris Island Light House, which replaced a beacon which stood there as far back as 1767, in the seventh year of the reign of George III. In 1870, upon the erection of the new light house traces of the old beacon were found, and relics were found in the corner stone of the old beacon, and a document which said that the corner stone of this beacon was laid when Lord Chas. Grenville Montague was Governor, and Hon. William Bull, Esq., Lieutenant Governor of the Province. Proceeding up East Bay going Northwards a great number of the most beautiful residences are passed, and a gorgeous view of the water front is enjoyed. At the head of East Battery stands Shamrock Terrace, while in the same enclosure is to be seen the Carolina Yacht Club,--all where Granville's Bastion stood in 1867. East Bay was formerly the shopping district for boat supplies. It fairly hummed with activity. Modern conditions have altered this, and the buildings are mostly given over to the residences of an undesirable sort. As you go along glimpses into arched passages and open courts may be had. They lend an air of fascination to this work-a-day world, with their foreign flavor of Creole court yards, red tiled roof and Spanish verandas. Continuing up East Bay passing Longitude Lane on the right, Tradd Street and Elliott, we finally come opposite to the place where once stood the French Coffee House,--the scene of many interesting bits of history in the social life of the Colony. Here also we find the structure known as the Old Post Office, or Exchange. This is one of the oldest Post Offices in the union. It was first called the Provost of Exchange, and to this day some good old Charlestonians speak of it as the Exchange Building. It was opened as a Post Office in 1815, and replaced in 1771 the old Watch House of history. As late as 1838 the pony express mail carrier would daily urge his horse with whip and spur in his course down Meeting Street through Broad and up to the very steps of the Post Office Building. From the steps of this Building Washington viewed the procession given in his honor when he arrived May 2, 1 791. In this building also were given the routs and balls which characterized the social part of his stay in Charleston. It is said that at these balls all the ladies wore bandeaux of white ribbons on their heads, on
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Title:
A Walk Around Ye Olde Charleston
Creator:
Leiding, Harriette Kershaw
Date:
1911
Description:
Guide for a walking tour of Charleston, containing a brief history of Charleston; descriptions of each location on the tour; and photographs of notable buildings. Published by Lanneau's Art Store (Charleston, S.C.). [6] p., [24] leaves : ill. ; 27 x 32 cm.
Collection:
Historic Charleston Foundation Monographs and Photographs
Contributing Institution:
Margaretta Childs Archives at Historic Charleston Foundation
Media Type:
Pamphlets
Topical Subject:
Historic buildings--South Carolina--Charleston, Dwellings--South Carolina--Charleston
Geographic Subject:
Charleston (S.C.)--Description and travel, Charleston (S.C.)--Guidebooks, Charleston (S.C.)--History, Charleston (S.C.)--Buildings, structures, etc.
Shelving Locator:
2005.001.02
S.C. County:
Charleston County (S.C.)
Material Type:
image/jpeg
Rights:
Digital image copyright 2010, Historic Charleston Foundation. All rights reserved. For more information contact Margaretta Childs Archives at HCF, P.O. Box 1120, Charleston, SC 29402.