Charleston's Historic Houses, 1954: Seventh Annual Tours Sponsored by Historic Charleston Foundation

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    CHARLESTON'S HISTORIC HOUSES 1954 Tours of Private Homes MARCH H through APRIL 9,1954 Sponsored by Historic Charleston Foundation 94 Church Street Charleslon, South Carolina Telephone 3-1168
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    FIRST TWO WEEKS TOUR A — MORNING TOUR Sunday, March 14 — 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., March 15, 16, 17, 18, 19; 22, 23, 24, 25, 26 WILLIAM GIBBES' HOUSE, 64 South Battery, c. 1772. Splendid Georgian mansion, has had among its owners the Rev. John Grimke Drayton, who planted the Magnolia Gardens. Noted for wonderful furniture, magnificent Adam ballroom. Home of Mr. and Mrs. Ashby Farrow. GIBBS-BLACKWOOD HOUSE, 22 Elliott Street, c. 1793. Located in the most recently restored neighborhood in the city, it is now a fascinating home, a veritable museum of the era of the Clipper Ship days of the China trade. The home of Commodore and Mrs. Stanley D. Jupp. WILLIAM ELLIOTT'S HOUSE, 75 King Street, c. 1739. A fine early example of Charleston architecture, with good primitive decoration in the panelling throughout. Little altered. Home of Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. Paul, III. * ASHLEY HALL, 172 Rutledge Avenue, c. 1816. (Open only week of March 14—March 19). Massive Regency house, noted for its spiralling stairway, ornate woodwork and mantels. Once the home of George A. Trenholm, great Charleston merchant and Secretary of the Treasury of the Confederate States. Since 1909 is has been a famous Southern School for girls. * JAMES SHOOLBRED'S HOUSE, 2 Ladson Street, c. 1793. (Open only week of March 22—March 26). James Shoolbred, first British consul at Charleston, probably built this house when he married Mary, daughter and heiress of Thomas Middleton of Crowfield. Unusual woodwork with fine overmantels. Home of Mr. and Mrs. B. Owen Geer. TOUR B — AFTERNOON TOUR Sunday, March 21 — 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. 3 p.m. to 6 p.m., March 15, 16, 17, 18, 19;—22, 23, 24, 25, 26. SIMMONS-EDWARDS HOUSE, 14 Legare Street, c. 1800. Built by Francis Simmons who created a Charleston mystery by leaving his wife as soon as he married her. House embellished with elaborate and pure Adam decoration, beautifully furnished. The extensive gardens are as handsome as the fine iron grill and fence added by George Edwards in 1816. The home of Mr. and Mrs. Bushrod B. Howard. MRS. JANE WIGHTMAN'S HOUSE, 36 Chalmers Street, c. 1840. Built early in the Greek revival style and renovated as a residence by Miss Josephine Pinckney, the Charleston author. Notable for its handsome and historic furnishings from the family plantations of El Dorado and Fairfield. JOSEPH WINTHROP'S HOUSE, 129 Tradd Street, c. 1797. Restrained Adam style of principal rooms practically in original condition, built by Joseph Winthrop, of New England, who married a sister of Charles Fraser, the miniaturist. Residence of Admiral and Mrs. William S. Popham. * WILLIAM ROPER HOUSE, 9 East Battery, c. 1848. (Open only week of March 15 through March 21.) One of the crowning touches to the classic revival in Charleston, its heroic towering portico not only gives a superb view of the harbor, but is an important part of that view. Recently purchased by Mr. and Mrs. J. Drayton Hastie. it is now shared with his mother, Mrs. C. Norwood Hastie, whose magnificent apartment you will see. * MRS. ANNE BOONE'S HOUSE, 47 East Battery, c. 1740. (Open only week of March 22 through March 26.) House rebuilt within walls of an older one by daughter of Landgrave Daniel Axtel, widow of Revoluntionary leader. Once the home of Thomas Boone, not only governor of South Carolina, but also of New Jersey. Home of Mrs. Sarah Bennett Smith. TOURS OF CHARLESTON'S HISTORIC HOUSES Schedule for 1954, March 14 through April 9 GEORGE EVELEIGH'S WILLIAM GIBBES' HOUSE HOUSE 1738 1772 Q__sa SIMMONS-EDWARDS HOUSE 1800 SPECIAL THURSDAY EVENING TOUR Thursday Evenings, 8 p. m. to 10 p. m., March 18, 25, April 1 and 8. TIMOTHY FORD'S HOUSE, 54 Meeting Street, c. 1800. This very handsome house in the Adam style was built by Timothy Ford. According to tradition, Lafayette was entertained here. Residence of Dr. and Mrs. Ransom S. Hooker, who will show the lovely rooms and fine old furniture by candlelight. ** Indicates homes open one week only. SECOND TWO WEEKS TOUR C — MORNING TOUR Sunday, March 28—2 p.m. to 6 p.m. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., March 29, 30, 31, April 1, 2; —5, 6, 7, 8, 9. WILLIAM GIBBES' HOUSE, 64 South Battery, c. 1772. Splendid Georgian mansion, has had among its owners the Rev. John Grimke Drayton, who planted the Magnolia Gardens. Noted for wonderful furniture, magnificent Adam ballroom. Home of Mr. and Mrs. Ashby Farrow. ** PHILIP PORCHER'S HOUSE, 19 Archdale Street, c. 1765. (Open only week of March 28 through April 2.) With its high brick basement, and back and front steps, reminiscent of old plantation homes. Little changed in almost two hundred years, this house recently come back into the builder's family. Mr. and Mrs. Richard G. White have furnished it with many family pieces. ** ASHLEY HALL, 172 Rutledge Avenue, c. 1816. (Open only week of April 5—April 9.) Massive Regency house, notable for spiralling stairway, ornate woodwork and mantels. Once home of George A. Trenholm, great Charleston merchant and Secretary of the Treasury ' of the Confederate States. Since 1909 a famous Southern School for girls. WILLIAM HENDRICK'S BUILDINGS, 83 Church Street, c. 1749. A charming bit of imaginative restoration, representing the best that has been done in Charleston. Restored in 1936 by Mr. and Mrs. Reynolds D. Brown. MRS. WILLIAM HEYWARD'S HOUSE, 31 Legare Street, c. 1789. Built by a member of one of the greatest rice-planting families of the Low Country. Fine panelling and delicate Adam ornament, particularly noteworthy drawing room with half-round bay and palladian window. One of Charleston's haunted houses. Home of Mr. and Mrs. Augustine T. Smythe. TOUR D — AFTERNOON TOUR Sunday, April 4 — 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. 3 p.m. to 6 p.m., March 29, 30, 31, April 1, 2; — 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. ** THE INGLIS ARCH HOUSE, 91 East Bay. (Open only week of March 29—April 2.) Since before 1730 the arched passage-way under this house has been an East Bay landmark. Thru the years houses have been built and rebuilt over it. The present one, in the center of colorful Rainbow Row, is the interesting and lovely home of Mrs. Elizabeth McGowan. On tour this year for the first time. ** COLONEL JOHN STUART'S HOUSE, 106 Tradd Street, c. 1772. (Open only week of April 4 through April 9.) Peak of Georgian design in this part of world. Built by Colonel Stuart, Commissioner of Indian affairs, who later lost his home for being a royalist during the Revolution. The splendid woodwork, doorways and mantels, serve as an admirable background for the furniture and portraits of the owners, Mr. and Mrs. John D. Wing. GEORGE EVELEIGH'S HOUSE, 39 Church Street, c. 1738. Built by Eveleigh whose great Indian trade went as far west as the Mississippi. Its street was a creek when it was built. Long the home of Miss Mary O. Marshall and her family. Most of the furniture is of Charleston origin, and for generations in owner's family. THOMAS LEGARE'S HOUSE, 90 Church Street, c. 1760. Built by a well-known Huguenot when Church Street was a lively part of Charleston's business district. Typical piazza, overlooking garden and arched brick wall, makes a charming entrance to the distinguished home of Mr. W. Lucas Simons. *!; WILLIAM MASON SMITH HOUSE, 26 Meeting Street, c. 1822. (Open only week of March 29 through April 4.) Built in the high taste of the Regency Style, this house with its fine facade, lovely vaulted entrance hall and spiral stair, may have been designed by the celebrated architect, Robert Mills. Home of Mrs. John R. Bennett. ** JAMES HARTLEY'S HOUSE, 43 East Battery, c. 1755. (Open only week of April 5 through April 9.) Built on Lot No. 1, of the Grand Model of 1672, at extreme southeast point of walled town, looking across Granville's Bastion. Mid-century Georgian, with par- ticulary interesting dining room. Home of Mrs. Elizabeth L. Hanahan.
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    SEVENTH ANNUAL SERIES OF TOURS Charleston's Historic Private Homes March 14 through April 9, 1954 Historic Charleston Foundation is opening twenty of the city's handsomest private homes to the public on a series of tours. The magnificent William Gibbes House, Colonel John Stuart's house, the charming William Hendrick's buildings; George Eveleigb's home, built in 1738, are but a few of the splendid homes to be shown the public. These homes span the golden century of American architecture, dating from 1735 to 1840, and are chosen not only for their architectural beauty, their historic merit, but also for the perfection of their furnishings, their beautiful china, glass, silver, and portraits. When Spring is at its height and the famous gardens are in bloom, these homes are lent the Foundation, which shows them for the benefit of this historic city, to preserve its beauty and its interest for the nation. EACH DAY, MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY, THERE WILL BE A MORNING AND AN AFTERNOON TOUR; each Sunday an afternoon tour. A home will be shown by candlelight on Thursday evenings from 8 to 10 p.m. The first two tours, A and B, will be shown March 14 through March 26, and eight homes will be open. The second two tours, C and D, will be shown March 28 through April 9, and eight other homes will be open. The hours are 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., each morning, and 3 p.m. to 6 p.m., each afternoon. On Sundays the hours are 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. No homes open on Saturdays. Tickets Tour tickets are $4.00 for a tour of four homes, or $7.00 for a combination tour of eight homes. Transportation when desired will be available at reasonable cost. Most of the homes are located within a ten-block area and it is often pleasant to make the tour on foot. Tickets may be purchased at local hotels, or at Foundation Headquarters, 94 Church St. Here reservations may be made for rooms in hotels, motor courts and private homes. We advise that reservations for rooms be made in advance. A COMPLETE SCHEDULE AND DESCRIPTION OF THE HOMES WILL BE FURNISHED ON REQUEST. HEADQUARTERS Historic Charleston Foundation maintains a Tourist Information Bureau and Tours Headquarters at 94 Church Street, Telephone, 3-1168. Here tickets may be purchased and full information secured on Charleston and its environs. Tickets are also on sale at local hotels. No tickets for sale in the homes. The Foundation publishes an illustrated booklet describing the homes open on The Tours and includes a short history of Charleston. This booklet is given everyone purchasing a ticket. Additional copies may be bought from Headquarters for fifty cents. There are also kodachrome slides of the exteriors and interiors of the homes for sale at Headquarters. ROOMS IN PRIVATE HOMES May be obtained through this office. We advise that all reservations be made in advance. HOTELS, INNS AND MOTOR COURTS St. John Hotel—Single, $5; Double, $8 to $10. Brewton Inn—Single, $5; Double, $7 up. Fort Sumter Hotel—Single, $5 up; Double $8 up. Francis Marion Hotel—Single, $5 up; Double, $8 up. Brookgreen Meadows Court—Double, $8. Lord Ashley Motor Court—Double, $8 up. Old Town Motor Court—Double, $8.50 up. Travelodge Motor Court—Double, $5.50 up. The Wayne Motor Court—Double, $7 up. The Pines Motor Court—Double, $7 up. Smith's Ranch Motel—Double, $7 up. Courtesy Information VIRGINIA, MARYLAND AND PENNSYLVANIA TOURS Historic Garden Week In Virginia, April 24 through May 1. Headquarters, Room 3, Jefferson Hotel, Richmond 19, Va. Maryland House and Garden Pilgrimage, April 30 through May 10. Headquarters, 217 Sheraton-Belvedere Hotel, Baltimore, Md. Pennsylvania House and Garden Tour, April 30 through May 3. Headquarters, Penn-Sheraton Hotel, 39th at Chestnut, Philadelphia, Pa. CHARLESTON: Saturday, March 13, 2:00 p. m —Plantation Tour, Women of St. Michael's. Saturday, March 20, 2:30 pjn.—Tour of Town Houses, St. Philip's Women's Auxiliary. Friday, March 26, 8:00 p.m.—Concert by Society for Preservation of Negro Spirituals, Footlight Players Workshop. Wednesday and Saturday Evenings, March 24, 27, 31, April 3, 8:30 p. m. — Candlelight Concerts at Heyward-Washington House. Saturday, March 27, 2:30 p.m.—Tour of Town Houses, Women of St. Michael's. Friday, April 2, 8:00 pjn.—Concert by Society for Preservation of Negro Spirituals, Footlight Players Workshop. Saturday, April 3, 1:00 p.m—Plantation Tour, St. Philip's Women's Auxiliary. Saturday, April 10, 2:00 p.m. Plantation Tour, Women of St. Michael's Church. SEVENTH ANNUAL SERIES OF TOURS MARCH 14 THROUGH APRIL 9, 1954 Nineteen Private Homes Open to Visitors There will be a series of four tours, with four houses on each tour. Each day, Monday through Friday, there will be a morning and an afternoon tour; each Sunday an afternoon tour. A home will be shown by candlelight on Thursday evenings from 8 to 10 p.m. No Saturday tours. TOURS ALTERNATE The first two tours, A and B, will be shown March 14 through March 26 and eight homes will be open. The second two tours, C and D, will be shown March 28 through April 9 and eight other homes will be open. The hours are 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. each morning, and 3 p.m. to 6 p.m., each afternoon. On Sunday the hours are 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Trained Hostesses On Hand Visitors are conducted through the homes by hostesses. Homes may be visited in any order desired. A tour ticket is good for the entire two week period and entitles the visitor to one admission to each house at any time during the hours the house is open. Transportation when desired will be available at reasonable cost. Most of the homes are located within a ten-block area, and it is often pleasant to make the tour on foot. TARIFF DAYTIME TOURS (A, B, C, D): Fee for each tour $4.00. Fee for combination of A and B, or C and D, $7.00. Special Evening Tour: One house only. Fee: $1. Tickets are on sale only at Headquarters and local Hotels. No tickets for sale in the homes. THE FOUNDATION Charlestonians are welcoming the public to some of their finest homes. When spring is at its height, and the famous gardens are in bloom, owners of nineteen distinguished homes will show them for the benefit of this historic city, to preserve its beauty and its interest for the nation, through Historic Charleston Foundation. The Foundation is a non-profit, educational institution, which seeks to preserve and use the architectural and historic treasures of the Charleston area—not as museums, but as living parts of the community. With funds from gifts (which are tax free), bequests, and the operation of tours, it offers planning and financial aid to preserve Charleston's heritage.
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    CHARLESTON'S HISTORIC HOUSES 1954 Seventh Annual Tours Sponsored hy Historic Charleston Foundation 94 Church Street Charleston, S. C.
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    The Historic Charleston Foundation In 1940, farsighted members of the Board of Directors of the Carolina Art Association determined to take action for the preservation of the many fine architectural and historic buildings which were Charleston's priceless heritage. The Civic Services Committee was formed and, with a grant from the Carnegie Corporation, a study was begun to determine the number of buildings within the city of architectural or historic value, and to classify them as to their importance. This tremendous undertaking was completed in 1944 with the publication of "This is Charleston," a classified directory of 1168 buildings worthy of recognition. In the march of time subsequent to the completion of this study, Charleston lost many of these valuable edifices through disfigurement or destruction, attributable to ignorance in the guise of progress, and it was deemed advisable to make some further move to implement the cause of preservation. Again the Carolina Art Association, following a suggestion made by Mr. Kenneth Chorley, President of Colonial Williamsburg, recommended that a corporation be formed for the dual purpose of educating the public as to the worth of these many fine old buildings, and to assist in their preservation whenever their destruction seemed imminent. From this group, and through private subscription, Historic Charleston Foundation was incorporated in 1947. This Foundation is a non-profit, educational institution seeking to aid and preserve Charleston's heritage, not only for those who live here, but for all who come to enjoy its beauty. The Board of Trustees of Historic Charleston Foundation, taking cognizance of the increasing difficulty of maintaining private institutions through public subscription, wisely sought some means whereby the Foundation might earn its own support. With this thought in mind, the annual Tours of Historic Houses was determined upon. For what could be more fitting than those homes which have been better cared for through their ownership, should aid the institution dedicated to the preservation of those equally worthy but less fortunate. For the ultimate aim of Historic Charleston Foundation is to preserve and use the architectural and historic treasures of the Charleston area, not as museums, but as living parts of the community. ■* 2 *•
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    In 1952 this foundation undertook its first restoration. We collaborated with the Rebecca Motte Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, the owners of our colonial Exchange that looks down Broad Street from East Bay. Together we replaced the pediment of this historic building. Smashed in the disastrous earthquake of 1886, it had remained ever since a cobbled-up atrocity. This brings a very prominent building into more authentic shape, and restores to Charleston another touch of the Palladian elegance that made her, in the middle of the eighteenth century, the finest colonial capital in British America. Here Charleston did its business in the flush years before the Revolution; here patriots worked to turn South Carolina from a colony into a state; here they suffered for their beliefs; and here, after the War was won, this city received and honored Washington on his presidential tour of 1791. Samuel G. Stoney, President, Historic Charleston Foundation OFFICERS President Samuel G. Stoney Vice-President Ben Scott Whaley Secretary Mrs. S. Henry Edmunds Treasurer C. Lester Cannon TRUSTEES Miss Alice R. Huger Smith—Honorary Mr. Loutrel W. Briggs Mrs. Percy Gamble Kammerer Mr. C. Lester Cannon Mrs. John P. Frost Mrs. Victor Morawetz Mrs. Lionel K. Legge Mr. E. Gaillard Dotterer Mrs. Coming Ball Gibbs Miss Josephine Pinckney Mr. William Mason Smith Mr. Henry P. Staats Mr. Ben Scott Whaley Mr. C. Bissell Jenkins, Jr. Mr. E. Milby Burton Mr. Benjamin R. Kittredge, Jr. Mr. Albert Simons Mr. Samuel G. Stoney Mr. Rorert N. S. Whitelaw Mr. G. L. Buist Rivers Mrs. Ashby Farrow Mrs. S. Henry Edmunds •d?- 3 *dd*
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    The Tours are held each year during the last two weeks in March and the first two weeks in April. They are planned to coincide with the season of the year when the gardens are in bloom, and when the city itself is at its loveliest, colorful with wisteria, azaleas and roses. The generous owners of the homes shown on these Tours are opening them to the public because of their interest in the work of Historic Charleston Foundation in its efforts to preserve Charleston's historic heritage of buildings. Without their very real contribution, these Tours would not be possible. It is only at this time of year that the private homes of the city are open to the public. During the 1954 season, twenty private homes will be open in a series of four daytime tours, and one evening tour. There are four houses on each davtime tour, with a morning and an afternoon tour each day, Monday through Friday, and an afternoon tour each Sunday. The hours are 10 a. m. to 1 p. m. in the mornings, and 3 p. m. to 6 p. m. in the afternoons. The first two tours are shown for the first two weeks, the second two tours run for the last two weeks. No homes are shown on Saturday. Each Thursday evening there is a special evening tour from 8 p. m. to 10 p. m., when one home is open. Visitors are conducted through the houses by hostesses. Homes may be visited in any order desired, but visitors will have to provide their own transportation where needed. Full information and tour tickets may be secured from the Tours Headquarters, 94 Church Street. Telephone 3-1168. Visitors are asked not to take interior photographs, and to refrain from smoking in the houses. TOURS COMMITTEE: Mr. E. Milby Burton, Chairman Mrs. Lionel K. Legge Mr. C. Lester Cannon Mr. E. Gaillard Dotterer Mr. Benjamin R. Kittredge, Jr. Mr. C. Norwood Hastie Mrs. a\sHBY Farrow Mr. Wilmer Hoffman Mr. G. L. Buist Rivers Mr. C. Bissell Jenkins, Jr. Mr. Samuel G. Stoney, ex-officio Mrs. S. Henry Edmunds, Tours Director 4- 4 *
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    THE TOURS HEADQUARTERS 94 Church Street c. 1759 Historic Charleston Foundation is fortunate in having for its headquarters a room in one of the city's historic houses, the residence at one time of the beautiful and unfortunate Theodosia Burr. The room occupied was, off and on for a hundred and eighty years, used as an office by lawyers and statesmen of Old Charleston. In 1759, this lot was purchased by Mary, wife of John Cooper, and a "free sole trader," doing business independent of her husband. The rich woodwork of the stairhall and the proportions of the exterior show that the house was one of the finest of its high-Georgian times in the town. In proof of this, John Izard, wealthy member of a wealthy family, paid the handsome sum of £9,999 current money for it in 1765. Another notable owner of the house was Joseph Alston, later Governor of South Carolina, and his lovely wife, Theodosia, daughter of the remarkable Aaron Burr. Her loss in a storm off Hatteras has been the simple cause of much elaborate romancing. About the middle of the nineteenth century a devastating remodeling of the interiors left little but the stairway to show how rich had been the decoration of the house a hundred years before. A fire-insurance marker on the street front is one of the few of its kind left in Charleston. In 1884 this fine old residence was purchased by the late George Paul, whose family ever since has made it their home. 5 ^
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    The English Tradition The earliest of the houses on our tours was built in 1738 and the latest in 1840 so that a century of architecture is presented for your enjoyment. They all belong to that fortunate age which saw the finest flowering of taste throughout the English speaking world. During this period, England was able to maintain high standards, thanks to the patronage of the arts assumed by her landed gentry and prosperous merchants. After the middle of the 18th Century, London became more and more the center from which new influences spread. The capital set the lead for the provincial cities and the colonial centers followed her example after a time lag of several years. Even fire regulations adopted in London eventually were reflected in building practices on our Atlantic seaboard. During the 18th Century, it was considered good business for a man of means to spend his surplus wealth on the improvement of the buildings and grounds of his estates. He was careful, therefore, to employ the best architectural talent available. Men of more modest resources were content with less ambitious programs, but they saw to it that the same fastidious care for the amenities prevailed. This taste was universally understood and accepted with rules as absolute as those of grammar and rhetoric. While such rigid controls led to a certain uniformity and lack of invention, it made for an impressively high average of performance. Every English gentleman in the 18th Century, whose credit permitted, sent his eldest son on the grand tour and did not expect him home until he had paid his respects to the paragons of architectural perfection on the European continent. This introduction to the recognized examples, though often superficial, at least established admirable standards that were accepted without question. While only the very great employed the famous architects, the influence of these artists was disseminated far and wide by innumerable publications illustrating their masterpieces and expounding their principles. ■* 6 *
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    Scores of great country houses were abuilding in all the English counties in the first half of the 18th Century, employing armies of skilled workmen of all kinds for many years under the most exacting supervision. Once standards were established, smaller and simpler homes were built with the same conscientious care and workmanlike finish. Many such master craftsmen bettered their fortunes by shipping to the American Colonies and contributing their knowledge and skill to our architecture. Any attempt to establish rigid stylistic categories seems both misleading and futile, architecture being constantly in a state of change as it responds to the many influences that determine its forms and functions. Throughout this period, the character of taste changed with each generation, but what is significant for us is that its quality remained at a constantly high level. By a happy accident of history, this city was one of the many beneficiaries of this era of taste, not assuredly in its most grandiose form, but in one of its simpler and more engaging moods that survives as a solace and a joy to a more distracted age. ALBERT SIMONS Fellow American Institute of Architects. » 7 ><•
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    Charleston began in April of 1670, the pleasantest time of her year, when the first colony, sent to settle what would become South Carolina, was led to her most excellent harbor and fine site by a friendly Indian Chief, the Cassique of the Kiawahs. The colonists were already a grand mixture of English, Irish, West Indians and Ber- mudans, but there were several men of experience among them. As soon as possible these had the tip of the wide peninsula that was called Oyster Point, reserved for a future town, but, being properly aware that the Spaniards of Elorida, their nearest colonial neighbors, considered them dangerous trespassers, they started the first settlement on a very defensible finger of land to the west of the Ashley and several miles further from the bar than Oyster Point. Wars in Europe and politics in England hindered the growth of the colony for ten years, but the first Charlestonians were able to scare away an expedition from St. Augustine in the first summer, and by 1672 felt secure enough to order that the site on Oyster Point be enlarged and marked out for a town. This was done from a "Grand Modell" which provided most of the principal streets between the Battery and the line of Beaufain Street, then continued as a boundary over to the Cooper. You can mark where it crossed the principal "path" up the peninsula by the "bend" in King Street. The "Grand Modell" provided two "great" streets, now called Broad and Meeting, to quarter roughly the largest area of solid ground within the creek-riddled site. These "great" streets intersected in a market place, lost long since under public buildings. Broad Street, then called Cooper, came to the river of the same name at about the center of the long bluff that ran along East Bay, from the head of East Battery to the Markets. This was used as wharfage until better could be built. After 1679, when the town was officially brought across the Ashley, the new Charles Town began growing inland from the bluff along streets then considered very wide and regular. Time and tempests, fashions and fires, bombardments and earthquakes have, in the centuries since, combined to destroy every known building from the Charles Town of the seventeenth century. Old prints, and such ancient plantation houses as that at Medway, give us some notion of what they were, but the lay of the city from the "Grand Modell" now remains its most authentic souvenir of that time. If the town's first ten years were hampered by the troubles abroad, the next twentv were complicated by rows at home. Once the wars were over, substantial West Indians came here bringing the form of plantations from the islands where they were being perfected. A tolerant constitution induced groups of Protestant minorities, suffering in the Counter Reformation, to colonize here. A considerable number of Erench Huguenots and English Puritans began to arrive in 1680. Quakers from England, Scotch Covenanters, Puritans from Long Island, and Baptists, driven from Maine by the theo- crats of Massachusetts, helped to make up a fine mixture that lost no heat from certain adventurous souls, who certainly had been privateers, and were freely accused of having been pirates. These made the town a smelting pot that boiled of its own frictional heat until the coming of the new century. * 8 *•
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    At. the same time the community found things to grow on. Bold traders carried a barter business with the Indians beyond the Mississippi. Rice was developed as a plantation staple. South Carolina began to feed the sugar islands, whence so many settlers came to her; to send them oak staves for their puncheons, and pine for their buildings. All three businesses lasted for many years; rice, for over two centuries. But loneliness, danger and the virtues of the harbor kept the isolated colony closely integrated with Charles Town, until the town was too strong to brook the rise of nearby rivals. With Virginia twice as far away as St. Augustine, and the vicious capes about Hatteras adding to the longer distance, the town was forced to be self-sufficient and to think like a city when it was still the size of a village. The opening of the eighteenth century brought Queen Anne's War to add to this characteristic. The thick-built part of the town was fortified with walls and bastions run in from the ends of the bluff and along the line of Meeting Street. These further compressed building as they made the town a true "city of refuge." Trouble followed trouble to keep it so. During the war, South Carolinians drove off a combined Spanish and French fleet and ravaged Florida up to the very walls of the stout little "castle" at St. Augustine. They then led Indian auxiliaries to drive the Tuscaroras out of North Carolina, and threatened the rival French traders at Pensacola and Mobile. Later they had to turn and fight for existence against a general rising of Indians led by the Yemasees. Then, when they had saved the colony, they had to send out naval expeditions to clear their coast and the North Carolina inlets of a heavy infestation of pirates. To cap everything, the colony in 1719 revolted from the inefficient rule of its Proprietors and was made a Royal Province. As such it throve largely until the Revolution. In those fifty-odd years Charles Town learned to live rather splendidly for a little capital and town-of-trade of a smallish colony. Hundreds of thousands of deer skins, not so valuable as peltries, but bulking into money, were brought in by boat and pack- train from all over our Southeast. Rice led planters up and down the Low Country of South Carolina and then across the Savannah into land this colony claimed between Savannah and Florida. King George's War came like Balaam to curse, by breaking up temporarily our rice market in Southern Europe, and, like the prophet, remained to bless, by causing the introduction of indigo, first as a substitute for rice then as an additional staple, that made many a fortune in the Low Country before it was lost in the Revolution. Money brought education abroad and culture at home. A gracious way of living in a semi-tropical climate began to call for architectural plans and details of our own. Most notable of these plans is that of the "single" house, so well illustrated by that of Mrs. Anne Boone, and so commonly and generally distributed. The town at this time completed or built many fine public buildings. At the beginning of the century one of the most peace-giving measures for the colony had been the establishment of the Church of England. This put religion into government and took it out of politics very effectively. It also created a number of fine and interesting church buildings in the parishes and the town. The second church of St. Philip's congregation was conceded for many years to be the finest ecclesiastical structure in England's American colonies. After King George's War, St. Michael's was built where the town had its first place of worship in a corner of the market place. About the same time two other equally fine "Palladian" buildings were given the corners across Meeting •# 9 *
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    Street. The Guard House, standing where the Post Office is now, was first butchered, then completely destroyed. The State House, burned out in 1788, was mangled somewhat in being made into a Court for the county, and has suffered severely since. Stopping the Bay end of Broad Street, the town built a fine Exchange that still exists. Taking these all together, and with such fine houses as those of William Gibbes and Colonel Stuart to fill in, Charleston must have been an impressively fine little city. The Revolution stopped almost all architecture and a great deal else until about 1790. Then the cotton gin and power mills for cleaning rice broke the bottle necks in a new and an old industry. By 1800 these had brought prosperity back to a town which had dignified its position by changing its name to Charleston. Its new Republicans found in the style of Robert Adam an untried and charming way of decorating, and/or planning their homes. More often this delicate and refined fashion was applied to the "single" house, as you will see it in that of Timothy Ford, and Francis Simmons, but, as Charleston was then spreading out into a number of suburbs, you will find an extraordinary lot of Adam houses scattered all over the city. Hunting them in our by-ways adds to the sport of a visit to, or a life in, Charleston. The War of 1812 set a sharp limit to this period and kept another from developing before 1820. Then Charleston discovered "Regency." Just as they had done with Adam's decoration, they now used the similar but more robust succeeding style, most often to modify their "single" houses. William Mason Smith's house is an example of a handsome compromise. Detail and facade may be Regency, but analyze the plan and you will find the principal rooms banked along the southern side of the building to constitute what is practically a "single" house with the stair pulled out to one side. And behind one conventional wing of the facade rise three tiers of masked piazzas. While Charleston began politically to measure the worth of the Federal Union in the 'thirties and 'forties, and to despair of remaining in it during the 'fifties, the architectural "revivals" came to her. Greek, Gothic and Classic she treated alike, largely as she had handled the Adam and Regency styles before them. Here and there you find developed "Greek" or "Classic" houses, but the styles, when not modified to our plans, were largely left to public buildings. Gothic of the eighteenth century, "Strawberry Hill" sort, had been used here already, in a playful but very limited way, on servants' houses and stablings. Be it said to the city's great credit that she never, in the days of its revival, debased it to use on a dwelling house. The Greek orders were used with similar discretion. You will see heroic Doric employed by a number of churches, but no Charleston house is huddled behind a miniature of a temple portico. Ionic and Corinthian, Greek and Roman, yes; but desecration of the great style, never! The war that Charleston began came nearer destroying her economically than physically. Despite the bombardments of three years, and all the other dilapidations of the poverty and chaos that followed, the adventure was a bit like the eruption that overwhelmed Pompeii and at the same time partly preserved for us that once wicked, charming, little city. Charleston's architectural life was well nigh in a state of suspended animation during all the ghastly "late" Victorianisms and the slow recovery of good taste after them. You can see some exceedingly dreadful examples of what a little money did to decent Charleston houses in the 'seventies and 'eighties, but only enough of them to point the moral. Poverty, virtuous as when St. Francis embraced her, kept the city relatively pure. So when a new era opened after World War I, there was much to love, to admire, and to save. With a mixture of faith and work, part of Charleston is trying to keep the best of her for the nation and posterity. SAMUEL GAILLARD STONEY •* 10 *
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    ON THE TOURS 1954 Descriptive Histories SAMUEL GAILLARD STONEY * 11 *
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    Carl Julien No. 1—GEORGE EVELEIGH'S HOUSE 39 Church Street c. 1738 Residence of Miss Mary O. Marshall Nestled in the "bend" in Church Street, behind a minute park-like spot, is the oldest home on these tours and one of the three or four oldest in the city. It has survived time, change, fire, wars and an earthquake that have taken practically all of Charleston's earlier buildings. George Eveleigh, to whom it is credited, was then a wealthy Charlestonian whose agents bartered British goods to the Indians of the Southeast for the thousands of deer skins that were then shipped away to Europe. It has been little changed by the long years of its life. The unsymetrical floor plan is almost unaltered. The rooms are splendidly panneled with wide cypress boards brought from Low Country swamps and fashioned by the tasteful handicraft of skilled carpenters. Their robust cornices, dignified panels and other simple early Georgian decorations are nearly as they left them. •* 12 «•
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    For many years this house has been the home of Miss Mary O. Marshall. Much of her furniture was made in Charleston, and most of it has served many generations of her kindred. Their good taste makes the collection a history of local amenities. As in most old Charleston houses, the drawing room is on the second floor. Here it gains spaciousness by taking up the entire front of a comparatively small house. Tall panels give grace to its proportions. The fireplace has an Adam mantel, saved from the town house of Nathaniel Heyward, once a celebrated and successful rice planter. Interest is centered here by arched doorways, one leading to a passage, the other framing a shell closet made for the display of fine china, now filled with Lowestoft, Famille Rose and Chelsea porcelain of the Marshall family's collecting. Carl Julien -* 13 «■
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    Carl Julien No. 2—WILLIAM ELLIOTT'S HOUSE 75 King Street c. 1739 William Elliott, whose distinguished family began here as a brotherhood of builders, appears to have built this house himself sometime before 1739, since it then appears on the Roberts and Toms map entitled "The Iconography of Charles-Town at High Water." Simple, stalwart designing and decoration, robust walls, and such details as the exterior chimneys to the west, all point to an early date of building. There were never any great fires to destroy this very interesting neighborhood, that was beginning to grow up about the same time that the thoroughfare through it ceased to be called "the little street that runneth from Ashley River to the Broad path to the country," and became King Street in honor of George I, who had taken the province over from the feckless rule of the Proprietors. Some time after 1753, when the invention of decorating tiles by transfer rather than painting was causing riots in Liverpool, the Elliotts smartened the large dining- room fireplace with the new sort of tile made by Sadler and Green, who had invented the process. And great was the pleasure of Mr. and Mrs. Paul, when in the process of their restoration they discovered many of these tiles, still decorating the original fire place. •£ 14 ^
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    Elliott particularly mentions the house in the will he made in 1765. Then it was occupied by "Mrs. Mary Stokes, school mistress." It went from his wife to his daughters, Mrs. Lewis Morris and Mrs. Daniel Huger. This is probably the oldest building in a very picturesque neighborhood. Several close to it are as large, but none so primitive. The block it stands in has been completely changed in the last twenty years. As small brick and wooden houses have come more and more into demand, the row of pleasant little buildings above this have been taken over from slumdom and worse. This house of William Elliott's is nearly the last to be rehabilitated in this very attractive section of an old suburb of the city. It owes its salvation to its present owners, Mr, and Mrs. Paul. Residence of Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. Paul III ■:. :W;fy:" ■'■fill! ^■arl Julien •» 15 «•
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    Carl Julien No. 3—MRS. ANNE BOONE'S HOUSE 47 East Bay Street c. 1740 Residence of Mrs. Sarah Bennett Smith This house seems to be one of the earliest of that architectural specialty called in Charleston a "single" house. One room thick and two rooms long, with a staircase in its middle, and set endwise to the street, the plan suited a small city lot and a climate that called for cross ventilation. At first, many "single" houses like this one had a door in the street front letting into a room that was used for an office or shop. The side doors to the stair hall then you served as a domestic entrance to the living quarters above stairs. and west sides completed this model. •£ 16 ^ Piazzas on the south
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    The walls within which Mrs. Anne Boone built seem, from their sturdiness, to have long antedated the fire of 1740 when all this part of Charleston was burned out. They may well have survived from the house she inherited in 1733 from her husband, Joseph Boone. All the building within them, however, comes from after the fire. Both of the Boones link us with South Carolina's early history. He came from a large company of Puritans who, fleeing from persecutions, came out from England in the sixteen eighties. Anne Boone's father, Daniel Axtell, the son of a regicide, for bringing out this party was made one of the hereditary nobility of Carolina with the title of Landgrave. Boone led in many of the political battles of these "Dissenters" in the opening years of the eighteenth century. Anne Boone's home, which stands much as she left it when she died in 1749, is therefore doubly interesting. Mrs. Sarah Bennett Smith, who has lately come into possession and residence here, has furnished the old house with many fine things, that, like the house, are both lovely to look at and object lessons in Charleston history. The Bennetts, from whom most of these furnishings come, were a notably versatile and active family. At the same time many of them were planters and millers, builders and architects, who made the brick and sawed the timbers they would turn into houses, and milled the rice they had grown. So you will find their Chippendale and Hepplewhite, their Empire and Victorian things, interspersed with furniture built with wood from their own mills and by their own cabinetmakers. These stand well too among their more sophisticated neighbors, to give an air of comfort and originality to the general charm of the house. ■i arl Julien ^ 17 «•
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    Carl Julien No. 4—WILLIAM HENDRICK'S BUILDINGS 83 Church Street c. 1749 This unexpectedly unusual little house has been selected especially as an example of what has been done in remodelings in Charleston. Before being turned into a residence by its present owners, its front rooms were part of an old kitchen building shared by two establishments on the street. These were all started together as an investment by a Christ Church planter named William Hendricks. Dying in 1749, he instructs his executors in his will to complete the two brick "tenements" he is building on Church Street and, "also the Back Buildings" thereto. So we can count their age very accurately. In the next couple of centuries the rooms on either side of the narrow, arched passage that frames a view of the garden, were used as shops by a variety of tradesmen and artisans. It is appropriate that you can now buy in them fine gifts, and they still serve their original purpose. They do this all the more charmingly because in all modern alterations great care has been taken to preserve the quaint appearance of the group from the street. ■* 18 «■
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    Mrs. Brown has furnished the winter home she improved from the two eighteenth century kitchens with an interesting collection of heirlooms. As she was born a Perry from Rhode Island, many of her things come from notable, sea-faring New England ancestors. So, among old Chinese porcelains and Korean chests, you may find a shield- back Hepplewhite chair used by the Constitutional Convention at Philadelphia in 1781; and over the cavernous arch of the erstwhile kitchen fireplace, now set out with a proper compliment of iron cranes, brass kettles and copper stew pans, you will see, well-carved and gilded, a spreading Federal Eagle that came from Nantucket and, doubtless, before that ornamented the stern of some tall old ship. Not the least charming part of what has happened to William Hendricks' "investment" is the delightful little paved garden seen through the arch from Church Street. Residence of Mr. and Mrs. Reynolds D. Brown ■ft,. Sid:,*" Car I Julien 19 «•
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    Carl Julien No. 5—JAMES HARTLEY'S HOUSE 43 East Battery c. 1755 Residence of Mrs. Elizabeth L. Hanahan Lot No. 1 of the Grand Model of Charleston in 1672 consisted of a sort of peninsula of land, between the marshes of the Cooper and a creek that paralleled them, located at the extreme southeast corner of the walled town. It was immediately across the street from Granville's Bastion, the strong point in Charleston's fortifications. James Hartley's house is located on a portion of this lot, and the present Shrine Temple covers the site of Granville's Bastion. The great fire of 1740 cleared this area of its first buildings. James Hartley bought the north part of the lot in 1755 "unimproved." The will he made soon after, leaving his house overlooking the Bay to his daughter Sarah, shows that he lost no time in building this substantial handsome house. Sarah, who became the wife of William Somersall, lived here with her family into the seventeen nineties. Thereafter in succession the house belonged to John Teasdale, John Fraser, and John Raven Matthews, whose family kept it as a residence into the twentieth century. Through the Hartleys and Teasdales this fine old residence is concerned with two Revoluntionary romances. Hartley's granddaughter, "Polly" Philip, during the British occupation, was the heroine of an elopement that still makes conversation. She was a bit of an heiress, and Captain Archibald Campbell, of the British Army, was enough of a wild fellow to be generally known as "Mad Archie." There are a half 20 «•
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    dozen versrons of the affair, but most of them agree that it culminated in a shot gun weddmg up at Goose Creek, conducted by the groom who not only heTd the ho^se pistol involved, but used it as a sort of baton, to lead the not very willing ctrgym" through the service. He was killed in a skirmish not long after. clergV™n John Teasdale, also a British officer, was quartered at the patriotic Verrees' where a daughter with a remarkably neat foot and ankle provoked him not only by he! Ameican sentiments, but by the display of blue-and-buff rosettes on he slippers It followed that he came back to Charleston for the lady after the war In SST' shipped the first bags of South Carolina cotton to Liverpool, only to W them seized as a most improbable product of the country. John Fraser, who followed the Teasdales in the house, was the Scottish fn„ 1 of one of Charleston's most opulent exporting firms. It enTlI 7 ( noTand T *"* °b ^ *" ^ ^ «W ^it?, F^Tten holm and Company, became a fiscal agent of the Southern Confederacy in England The Teasdales, or some subsequent owner closed a rental f™,af j Carl Julien ^ 21 ^
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    Courtesy Carolina Art Association, No. 6—THOMAS LEGARE'S HOUSE 90 Church Street c. 1760 Standing together on Church Street is a group of three very fine old Charleston "single" houses that beautifully illustrate both the conservatism and the charm of the city's taste in building. The most northerly of these seems to date from the 1750's. It is here that the offices of Historic Charleston Foundation are located. The middle house is known to have been built about 1809. The other, judging by its most excellent woodwork, belongs to Pre-Revolutionary time and has been dated from the 1760's. Though spanning a half century of building in Charleston, at first glance these three would seem contemporaries. Since the land where this last house stands was owned by Thomas Legare before 1752, it can easily be attributed to that son of one of the outstanding Huguenot emigrants to this colony. It is very fitting that it should lately have been charmingly and carefully restored by two Charlestonians of Huguenot name and lineage, William Lucas Simons and his late wife, Adele Petrigru (Conner) Simons. Between the ownerships of old Thomas Legare and that of Simons, this house stands for a great deal that has been most gracious and praiseworthy in Charleston's history. Only two notable changes have been made between these far-removed owners. A look at the middle window at the front of the ground floor indicates an overwide flat arch still marking where Legare had the entrance to an office. And the detail of the •* 22 &
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    handsome Regency piazza shows you that they were added by George MacAuley, who in 1816 bought and pulled down the next-door house to make a yard for his. The brick wall he made that bounds it in has the very characteristic arched construction of the best Charleston building. The house has much fine old furniture and some most interesting portraits. Hanging in the drawing room are two that are peculiarly worth noticing. Above the hanger (the small curved sword) he wore with his fatigue uniforms, is a painting of Keating Simons, rice planter on Cooper River and once Brigade-Major to General Francis Marion, the famous South Carolina partisan. Near it is Sully's portrait of Adele Petigru Allston, sister to that most notable of South Carolina Unionists, James Louis Petigru, and wife of R. F. W. Allston, a great rice planter, and a liberal governor of ante-bellum times. Residence of Mr. W. Lucas Simons •* 23 «■
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    Carl Julien No. 7—PHILIP PORCHER'S HOUSE 19 Archdale Street c. 1765 This house, so like many that have long since vanished from the plantations of the Low Country and containing many pieces of furniture that came from them, was built in 1765 by Philip Porcher on this lot, from lands bought by his wife's family, the Mazycks, in 1711. In spite of such losses as massive brick steps to a central entrance on Archdale Street, this austere old four-square house with its beautiful high, brick basement and tall paneled rooms is very like those that rich indigo planters were then building in the Parish of St. Stephen's or St. James', Santee. Philip Porcher turned Tory when the British overran the State. After the Revolution he was sentenced to be stripped of his entire estate. His good character saved him from this sentence, so that at last he was mulcted only of considerable moneys he had loaned South Carolina at the beginning of the war. ■» 24 «•
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    After his death the house remained in his family until 1835. At that time the land had been 125 years and the house 70 years in the possession of one connection. Judging by the style of the alterations, the next owner, Augustus Theodore Gaillard, added the present southern piazza with its neat square posts, carefully worked to a diminishing entasis, destroyed the old entrance that led directly into the larger drawing room, and contrived the present one through the piazza. In 1929 this house was in sad disrepair. Major and Mrs. Robert Gibbes Thomas, in making it their home, devoted a great deal of time and care to make it also a most thoughtful preservation. So doing, they made such happy discoveries as the uncovering of a long-buried brick walk precisely where they had planned one in the center of the yard. In 1949 Mrs. Thomas sold it to its present owners, Mr. and Mrs. Richard G. White, and they are carrying forward the restoration and improvements. Mrs. White was Laura Porcher of Ophir Plantation, St. John's Parish, a close collateral of Philip Porcher, the builder of their home. To- it she and Mr. White have brought, with a great deal of appreciative affection, a lot of fine old furniture that comes in good part from the region, the kindred and the times of the man who built this house so long ago. Residence of Mr. and Mrs. Richard G. White Carl Julien •& 25 «*
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    Carl Julien No. 8—WILLIAM GIBBES' HOUSE 64 South Battery c. 1772 Residence of Mr. and Mrs. Ashby Farrow This splendid mansion, built at the height of Charleston's Georgian period, was extensively redecorated again in the midst of her craze for Adam style. The result is both extraordinarily distinguished and pleasing. The present owner's very fine furniture combines to make it one of the handsomest houses in the city. The house was started soon after 1772 by William Gibbes. The Ashley then came up to the opposite side of the street and Gibbes had also a very long wharf running out to its channel, where he conducted his business. The wharf had a most agreeable function. In hot weather a place of "genteel entertainment" used to be fitted up at its far end where Charlestonians might partake of both the cooling air and some light refreshments. After its owners died, the house became the home of Mrs. Sarah Moore Smith and long continued in her family. About 1800 the Smiths added the monumental marble stairways at the front, put a high cove to the parlor ceiling, and enriched much of the Georgian woodwook with Adam ornaments. •» 26 «€■
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    The Reverend John Grimke Drayton, who later owned the house, took his mother's surname to inherit Magnolia Plantation on the Ashley, and, when a "clergyman's throat" had driven him from the active ministry of the Episcopal Church, made there the world-famous garden. In the nineteen-twenties, Mrs. Washington A. Roebling, widow of the builder of the Brooklyn Bridge, bought the house from the Sloan family, whose home it had long been. Mrs. Roebling made extensive restoration and alterations. For her collection of oriental art and ceramics the southeast room on the principal floor was remodeled in the mode of Chinese Chippendale. The rooms at the rear were lengthened and the brick stairway added to connect the house with the fine formal garden. It is now the home of Mrs. Roebling's grandson, Mr. Ashby Farrow, and Mrs. Farrow. Carl Julien ^ 27 ^
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    No. 9—COLONEL JOHN STUART'S HOUSE 106 Tradd Street c, 1772 In the lull between the triumphant war with France and our own Revolution, the western suburbs of Charles Town included a little Vauxhall called the Orange Garden. There in the summers you heard "consorts" of music and saw theatrical skits in the open air among the trees. A little while after, the garden was turned into building lots Colonel John Stuart obtained the corner lot at Tradd Street and built about 1772 one of the finest houses in the city. Probably a Jacobite who had been out in "the '45" rising, Stuart had come to South Carolina about 1748—and like a good many others of his business-like countrymen, gone into the Indian Trade. He had so succeeded that he was made Commissioner of Indian Affairs for all the southern colonies, with a seat in each of their councils, and could readily afford to pay eighteen thousand pounds, Carolina money, to give himself a beautiful and most dignified residence. Three years afterwards, in 1775, accused of inciting the frontier Indians against the Carolina rebels, Stuart fled to Florida where he remained the last three years of his life. For a while after the Revolution the house was owned by Alexander Gillon, a high-living, free-spending, Dutch adventurer who had been Commodore of South Carolina's own navy. •£ 28 «•
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    Always highly esteemed, it passed on to other well off n the.time of the Confederate War it was the ■* 29 «■
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    Carl Julien No. 10—THE INGLIS' ARCH HOUSE 91 East Bay Street c. 1778 T/ie residence of Mrs. Calvin McGowan Her "Grand Model" of 1672 gave Charleston a lot of over-sized squares that citizens soon cut up with undersized thoroughfares. Before 1730 one of the narrowest was a passage run through lands of the Elliott family to connect very busy East Bay, where they had their wharf, or "bridge", with quite busy Bedon's Alley, where they had other buildings. The passage got a permanent name before the Revolution when George Inglis lived and had his business in the house that stands where this one is today. The arched entrance took its name from Inglis and gave it to the passage. Until the devastating fire of 1778 burned this way the arch was part of the "beautiful Bay Street of Charleston! Every house for a mile three stories high!" and all built with an "order and regularity" that made it appear vastly better than the waterfront of contemporary New York. Alteration of any number of sorts, at any number of times, makes the dating of the present building almost impossible, but it seems to have come in part from a rebuilding after 1778. ■* 30 «•
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    In 1794 it was purchased by Frederick Kohne, who made a large fortune in the business he conducted here. Dying, in 1829, in gratitude to the city, he left the property to the Orphan House of Charleston. It came back into private hands in 1836 and had a respectable career until the Confederate War. Meantime the harbor, whose edge had been at first just across the street, had retreated, and business had gone with it to other parts of the waterfront. With its neighborhood this house went downhill. When in a most desperate state of dilapidation, it was part of the locale on which DuBose and Dorothy Heyward created "Porgy and Bess." After 1938 it was one of six houses bought and largely rebuilt by the McGowans in a private slum clearance that redeemed a large part of Rainbow Row. Very interesting Eighteenth century French furniture and modern painting, a variety of handsome and charming furnishings of all sorts have added immeasurably to a fine house, cleverly contrived, on a delightful and historic site. /TjTv;r;;;;•;;;2;■;;;;;v;;';:;■-;:; ;'rr:rrf;;;;::-:•->d";;■-'■■"■ d;:-a-;-..--;- d-(:;d^.:v;::/- Hal Norvell ■* 31 «*
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    Carl Julien No. 11 -MRS. WILLIAM HEYWARD'S HOUSE 31 Legare Street c. 1789 This pleasant double house, with its rather unusual entrance across a stone flagged lower piazza, stands in the center of a never-divided lot from the "Grand Modell" of 1672. About 1789 it was built by the widow of William Heyward, whose brother, Thomas, had signed the Declaration of Independence. Like her in-laws, Hannah Shu- brick Heyward was a successful rice planter. Her house shows this in "improvements" that were obviously made soon after its building. Among these is the "bow" to the south with its delicate palladian window in the large upstairs parlor. It remained her home until 1829. In this time it unhappily acquired a fairly well-authenticated ghost. Young James Heyward, son of the builder of this house, was riding out hunting on a plantation in the Euhaws. His hounds bayed a hog and he struck at them with the butt of his gun. It went off and shot him dead from the saddle. He appeared, according to the legend, that very hour to his sister in the room that is now the library. And he has been seen there since, always in the same attitude, his head in his hand, seated pensive at the table. •» 32 «■
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    On its builder's death, the house went to her daughter, Mrs. William Drayton, who, while she lived in Charleston, allowed the use of it to the celebrated French shool- mistress, Mile. Julie Datty. As a penniless refugee from the revolution in San Domingo, she found work as an expert laundress, but both her manner and her hands proclaimed her a lady. The Hey wards were among those who then helped her establish a school where young ladies learned good French and better manners. In their eighty-four years of ownership, the Smythes have made many additions and it was a home until they, in turn, sold it in 1870 to the late Augustine T. Smythe. In their eighty-four years of ownership, the Smythes have made many additions and some alterations to Mrs. Hey ward's building. Two of her handsomest rooms, however, remain much as she built them. The big parlor was lately restored to its state. The library beneath it, where the ghost has been seen, seems to have assimilated the bookcases which now completely fill its walls. The house has the happy faculty of taking into its own pleasant atmosphere a variety of handsome furnishings. A palmetto, planted with much ceremony by the Ropers as an emblem of South Carolina on the day when the state seceded from the Union, now towers above the roof line of the southern bow. Residence of Mr. and Mrs, Augustine T. Smythe i •* 33 «•
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    No. 12—THE GIBBS-BLACKWOOD HOUSE 22 Elliott Street Residence of Commodore and Mrs. Stanley D. Jupp With his restoration of this house Commodore Jupp put a final touch to an adventure in the preservation of Old Charleston. His residence is being shown, just at its completion, to illustrate what private enterprise, applied with ingenuity and taste, can do to resurrect into decency, comeliness and usefulness a long decayed neighborhood. Across Elliott Street from the Jupps' is the clever adaptation by Mrs. Henry Chisolm of a once dilapidated warehouse. With their roof gone, these walls make an interesting and very useful parking space, a functional addition to the neighborhood without in the least detracting from its appearance. Parking, with all its problems, is a challenge in every city. Here is a fine and appropriate solution. Similar problems have been met in like fashion along little Bedon's Alley that runs off to the south from the Jupp house. Narrow Elliott Street has a long and varied history. At the beginning of the eighteenth century it was run through one of the overly large squares laid out in 1672. The street had a number of names and fortunes. It was called Callaibeuf's and Poin- ■* 34 «•
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    II Carl Julien No. 13—JAMES SHOOLBRED'S HOUSE 2 Ladson Street c. 1792 Residence of Mr. and Mrs. B. Owen Geer As well as can be ascertained, James Shoolbred, first British Consul at Charleston, built this house in the Georgian style in 1792, at the time of his marriage to a very wealthy young lady, Mary, daughter and heiress of Thomas Middleton of Crowfield. The Shoolbreds were in occupancy of the place when the land reverted, for some unexplained reason, to the estate of the Honorable John Drayton, and the establishment was sold in 1796. In 1802 it was sold again for the handsome sum of 2085 guineas sterling to William Skirving, a prominent planter, who apparently enlarged the house by adding the octagonal bay to the west and "improved" the rooms so brought into prominence with Adam mantels. ^ 36 ^
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    Built when recovery from our Revolution was first getting under way, this house follows the fashion of work popular before that upheaval. Notable examples of this "lag" are the excellent mahogany stair rail with its elaborately turned balusters, and the decorations of the old upstairs parlor now used as a bedroom. In this and the big room next to it, two handsomely carved four-posters give an impressive sense of the scale of living such houses once maintained. The more recent parlor on the first floor, with its bay and Adam decoration, makes an interesting contrast with the one it superceded. In the dining room is a handsome collection of silver, inherited and collected. This house stood on a narrow little court leading from Meeting Street. In 1893, the late George Edwards opened and widened the court and it became Ladson Street. Then he seems to have added the odd entrance porch and the decorations of the pediment over it. mr • Carl, juiten •* 37 «•
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    Carl Julien No. 14—JOSEPH WINTHROP'S HOUSE 129 Tradd Street c. 1797 It is now hard to imagine that when Joseph Winthrop built his house its site was part of an open "green", its lot line backing on a salty creek, and the marshes of the Ashley were hardly a stone's throw from its back windows. Charleston, though much smaller than she is today, was a booming Post-Revolutionary town whose trade induced many clever young New Englanders to try their luck in the offices and shops along her Bay. Winthrop, from Boston, was one of these who made good. Here he married an elder sister of the miniaturist, Charles Fraser, and soon built this house on land of hers to be a home for what came to be a large family. Counting out a dining room, and lower and upper reception rooms, or parlors, the tall old house had but three rooms left for sleeping quarters; but the names engraved •* 38 Mf
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    with a diamond on one of the old windowpanes show that eleven children and their parents once lived here pleasantly together. The principal rooms in the front of the house stand much as when they were built. They are decorated with woodwork designed in a very simple but most charming transitional style, keeping something from the late Georgian work of pre-revolutionary days, borrowing lightness from the Adam decoration that would overrun the town in a few years. An interesting detail of the dining room is a mantel gotten from the destroyed home of Henry Laurens, President of the Continental Congress, and one of the most able leaders of South Carolina in the Revolution. Behind the house a well designed block of brick service buildings, once a combination of a coach-house, stables and kitchens, has been turned into pleasant apartments. It is shown in the photograph. The furnishings here are both cosmopolitan and biographical. After a lifetime of service in the Navy, the Pophams have brought home many notable things from China and Japan. The rest tell a family history with the heirlooms the Admiral has brought from New York and New Jersey and those that came to Mrs. Popham from Charleston and many outlying family plantations. Residence of Admiral and Mrs. William S. Popham -,.;." •'■JS. Carl Julien •* 39 «•
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    Hal Norvell No. 15—SIMMONS=EDWARDS HOUSE 14 Legare Street c. 1800 Francis Simmons, who created an unsolved Charleston mystery by leaving his wife immediately after they were married and thereafter maintaining a casual, though friendly, acquaintance with her, acquired the property in 1800, and would appear to have built this very handsome "single" house upon it shortly thereafter. Later he bought a lot and wooden house to the south. On his death he left this, during her widowhood, to a relative, prohibiting her from building, between her house and the street, anything that could interfere with the air or prospect of his brick house adjoining. George Edwards, who* bought both properties in 1816, two years after Simmons' death, disposed of the wooden house. According to tradition, it was rolled down the street to become the present No. 1 Legare Street, He then made a garden of the south lot and embellished it with the fine Regency fence and gates, and his house with its formal entrance. With proper pride he marked his work by placing his initials in the centers of the two curving iron grills that flanked his front door. Tradition says that he ordered this iron work and the elaborate marble cappings of his additions direct from Italy. The story goes that he sent a live-oak acorn to serve as a model for the tall finials, but the Italian marble cutters would have none of this and substituted ■£ 40 «•
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    the conventionalized pineapples, the emblem of hospitality. Edwards constructed also a very handsome fence between his yard and garden, the heads of which form an interesting pattern of intersecting curves. This place has long been a joy to the city and its owners, and it has been fortunate in them. For even when one, yielding to the fashion of the time, substituted mid- nineteenth century marble mantels in some of the rooms, he stored those he removed in the attic whence they were brought back into place a half century later. The Howards, in their short ownership, have done a great deal with the gardens. Using Edwards' "improvements" as a basis for the design, they have turned the rear portion of this ample old yard into a very suitable and handsome formal garden. Residence of Mr. and Mrs. Bushrod B. Howard •% 41 «•
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    Carl Juixen No. 16—TIMOTHY FORD'S HOUSE 54 Meeting Street c. 1800 With its gracious and lovely Adam decoration, this house marks the new departure into that style that came to Charleston at the beginning of the nineteenth century. Timothy Ford, its builder, who as a boy had fought and been wounded in the Revolutionary War, came here from his New Jersey home to practice law after graduating from Princeton. He succeeded both professionally and socially, rising to the top of the bar and marrying, in turn, into two prominent Charleston families. He built this house for his second wife on a street then coming into its own as a place of fine residences. His family lived here for over a century. Among them was Edmund Ravenel, M.D., a conchologist of note. Most unselfishly a scientist, he is said to have sacrificed a rice crop growing on his Cooper River plantation by drawing off the reserve water that should have irrigated it in order to complete the famous Aggassiz's collection of local fish. The house, which has ever lent itself to hospitality, has one very interesting record. During the Revolution Ford's mother entertained Washington at their Morristown home. Nearly fifty years afterwards Ford entertained Lafayette in his home in Charleston. •* 42 *•
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    For a number of years Dr. and Mrs. Hooker have made it a winter residence. Like its builder, they are northerners who are contributing much to a southern city. Their furniture is as handsome as can be seen in this country. As it will be shown by candlelight, the beauty of their old sliver and mahogany, their lovely antiques, china, and glass, will be given a most appropriate and complimentary setting. Of particular interest are a step-top cherry highboy thought to be the only one of its kind in America, and a small four poster field bed that has been used by the family for six generations. Residence of Dr. and Mrs. Ransom S. Hooker Carl Julien •ft 43 *•
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    Courtesy Carolina Art Association Van Anda No. 17—ASHLEY HALL 172 Rutledge Avenue c. 1816 Ashley Hall is probably Charleston's outstanding example of a suburban Regency Villa. Patrick Duncan, who had made a pleasant fortune as a tallow-chandler and then became a factor, turned his place of business into a garden for this residence which he built in 1816, as the neighborhood was becoming the fashionable suburb of Cannon- borough. The house was bought in 1836 by James Reid Pringle, leader of the Unionist Party in the Nullification controversy, and Collector of Customs of Charleston District from 1819 to 1840. Following this, his house was owned and occupied by George A. Trenholm a man of noted personal charm, one of Charleston's greatest merchants, head of John Fraser and Company, and of its Liverpool Branch, Trenholm and Company, and for some time Secretary of the Treasury of the Confederate States, •^ 44 «•
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    After the Trenholms ceased to own it, the house became the residence of Charles Otto Witte, a cotton merchant and banker, and the father of a family of beautiful daughters. Many of the fine exotics and trees about the garden come from his time. Since 1909, under the name of Ashley Hall, the house has been a school for girls. Ashley Hall is now the most direct link from this part of the south with the major women's colleges of the country. The exterior of the house is substantially as it was built, though the basement of the heroic portico has been enclosed. The mantels and decorations of the prinicpal rooms, and the fine stairway spiralling up are unchanged, but in the stairhall on the second floor and at other points it is interesting to note the heavy moulding and decorations of Victorian times, probably applied when the house was Trenholm property. ! 1 Courtesy •* 45 *•
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    No. 18—WILLIAM MASON SMITH'S HOUSE 26 Meeting Street c. 1822 About 1820 Charleston was sufficiently recovered from the War of 1812 to start building in a grand manner with a new style. While England had been fighting France, she had done a little borrowing from the enemy's culture. One acquisition was a robustly ornamental style of architecture called Regency, carried over with some variation from that of the French Empire, and called so in honor of the Regency of the Prince of Wales, during the insanity of George III. The style had just come in full strength to Charleston when, in 1822, William Mason Smith, planter son of South Carolina's first bishop, set about making himself a home on Meeting Street. There is no record of his employing an architect, but Robert Mills was then working in Charleston. A most able planner and a fine designer, Mills claims to have been the first native American architect. Charleston, where he was born, owes him the ^ 46 ^
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    design of the old Baptist Church and of the Fireproof Building. Resemblance to these would make it seem probable that this house was also his work. Conservative and experienced, Charleston bound whatever style it used to planning won from long experience with its climate. So, though the details of the fine facade, the lovely vaulted entrance hall, the spiralling stair, and the spacious rooms are Regency—the plan is Charleston, very like that of a "single" house with accessories banked on its north side, so that the principal exposure to the south is kept for the best rooms. By this time piazzas had become so desired that many an old house had them added to walls obviously never expected to receive them. However delightful functionally, piazzas were awkward things to handle in formal designing. To meet the problem, those here are masked toward the street with the masonry wall matching that of the narrow northern wing, complete with sashed windows. Since the arrangement added measurably to the privacy of these much lived upon features of a Charleston house, they must not be considered so entirely "theatrical" as a side view makes them appear. After having been the home of its builder's family for over a century, the house passed into other hands, and is now the residence of Mrs. John R. Bennett. Residence of Mrs. John R. Bennett Carl Julien •* 47 «•
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    No. 19—ROBERT WILLIAM ROPER'S HOUSE 9 East Battery c. 1838 It is a bit puzzling, to walk in a couple of blocks out of the eighteenth century atmosphere of East Bay into the mid-nineteenth century architecture of East Battery. Your explanation is the sea wall, called in Charleston "The High Battery." Not until the eighteen thirties was this made high enough and strong enough to give protection from the hurricane tides that swept up the harbor from the sea. Who Robert William Roper had for his architect is not now known, but the versatile and able Edward Brickell White, who designed many of the city's finest buildings, among them the Huguenot Church and the Market Hall, had just begun to practice in Charleston. There is a high likelihood of his being the architect. In 1838, when the house was begun, the site was even more splendid than now, since nothing stood to the South between its monumental portico and the Ashley. Its heroic proportions are due to this. The rest of the house is in scale with and equal in finish to this distinguished piece of classic revival designing. As a whole, it is in many ways the most splendid private residence n Charleston. In 1845, its owner, dying without children, a large part of his inherited wealth went by his father's bequest to found the Roper hospital. Mrs. Roper sold the house in 1851. Since then it has been owned by a number of families, notably that of the late General Rudolph Siegling and the late Solomon R. Guggenheim. •* 48 «•
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    Its present owners have faced and solved what is becoming an increasing problem in Charleston. Our large old houses, built by a more relaxed and serviced generation, are hard to adapt to modern requirements. By making the main rooms of this house into two beautiful apartments the Hasties have kept its integrity and charm and insured its further happy existence. It was the boast of the neighborhood that the only thing that stood between them and the Canary Islands was Fort Sumter. Look through the windows of the rooms pictured here and let your eye wander from that line and you can read two hundred and eighty years of history in the names of the landmarks about one of America's finest and most romantic harbors. Residence of Mrs. C. Norwood Hastie and Mr. and Mrs. J. Drayton Hastie Carl Julien ■* 49 «•
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    Carl Julien No, 20—MRS. JANE WIGHTMAN'S HOUSE 36 Chalmers Street c. 1840 The most recent of the houses on our tour through a century of Charleston's architecture, this residence was completed in 1840 in the early style of the Greek Revival. Almost on its 100th birthday, the house was purchased by Miss Josephine Pinckney, the Charleston author. By keeping the principal rooms intact and using the original woodwork as a model for her new decoration, Miss Pinckney has done a fine bit of preservation, retaining old characteristics while making a convenient modern residence. The delicate wrought iron balcony with its five-pointed star was added from a house standing just around the corner on Meeting Street, but now destroyed to make place for a filling station. The garden gates (properly marked with her cipher), the entrance door, and the garden itself are the owner's own contribution to the outer part of her establishment. •» 50 «•
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    In an upper room that looks out over one of the last cobbled pavements in the city and past it to such Charleston heirlooms as Robert Mills' Fireproof Building, Gabriel Manigault's City Hall, and the spire of St. Michael's, Miss Pinckney writes the novels that are now also a part of her region's heritage. The house is notable also for its handsome and often historic furniture and decorations. Over the mantel in the dining room is a portrait by James Earle of Miss Pinckney's great-grand-uncle, General Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, of Revoluntionary and diplomatic fame. The window curtains are from the splendid East Bay home of his father, Chief Justice Pinckney, which burned in the great fire of 1861. Residence of Miss Josephine Pinckney Carl Julien •» 51 «•
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    A Guide for The Visitor to Charleston WHERETO STAY TO DINE TO SHOP WHAT- TO SEE * 52 *
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    Mayor William McG. Morrison and Members of City Council cordially invite you to visit the Council Chamber Art Gallery in City Hall. It is also their wish that your visit here will be an enjoyable one and that you will return many times. PIERATES CRUZE Mount Pleasant, South Carolina GARDENS BY THE SEA Famous Gold Medal Camellias OVer 300 Varieties OPEN ALL YEAR — ADMISSION CHARGED 7 Miles from Charleston — 1 Mile from Highway No. 17-North ANTIQUES Geo. C. Birlant & Co. 191 King Street Charleston, S. C EVERETT'S HESTAPHAJVT WEST END CANNON ST.—"Near Ashley River Bridge" DINING ROOM CAR SERVICE DELIVERY SERVICE Specializing In PIT BARBEQUE MAMMY'S FRIED CHICKEN SEA F00DS Air Conditioned Telephone 3-4128 ->!• 53 -:■«-
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    In The Historic Heart of Charleston ST. JOHN HOTEL Mrs. J. W. Ivev Vice-President Edmund B. Simms Manager .ATTRACTIVE RATES CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA MEETING STREET AT QUEEN "JrS • house of better values Vk • shopping center for coastal Carolina SSI • one of the south's great department stores both corners—king street at warren LORD ASHLEY COURT 2Vi miles South of City on U. S. 17 TELEPHONE 6-1611 AIR CONDITIONED ROOM TELEPHONES SEARS9 ROEBUCK A COMPANY 374 KING STREET * 54 ■;'•
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    Elizabeth O'Neill Verner Studio - 38 Jraad Street Charleston I, S. C. 2-4246 SEE CHARLESTON COMPLETELY By: Bus Limousine By Yacht Airplane GRAY LINE TOURS Francis Marion Hotel Phone 2-4444 New and Used Books Bookhunting Rental Library 9:30 to 6 THE BOOK BASEMENT 9 COLLEGE STREET (OPPOSITE COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON) Hundreds of books on Charleston, the Lowcountry, and South Carolina. Send for list. If you want a book, any book, ask us about it. If it is out of print, we can probably find it. D. TROWBRIDGE ELLIMAN PLANTATIONS TOWN AND COUNTRY HEAL ESTATE DIAL 3-4181 SALES, RENTALS AND APPRAISALS Post Office Box 305 3 6 Broad St. Charleston. S. C. Lnusual Old Timey "Charleston" Candies OLD SLAVE MART PEACH LEATHER BENNE BRITTLE BENNE WAFERS BENNE BITS PECAN PRALINES Made by Original Old Receipes Phone 2-4130 SLAVE RECIPES, INC. 6 Chalmers St. The South Carolina National Bank 16 Broad St. 253 King St. Charleston Heights Member of The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation * 55 «
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    Charleston's only 100% air-conditioned hotel "Our Beautiful Coffee Shop and Courtyard Specializing in old Charleston dishes' Owned and Operated by Charlestonians •*"!• 56 dd"
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    Like Another World Outdoor Restaurant and Gift Shop Spirituals Sung Saturday and Sunday afternoons Route 52, Twenty-four Miles North of Charleston THE PINES MODERN MOTOR COURT 5 MILES NORTH OF CHARLESTON, S. C. ON HIGHWAY 17 Member Quality Courts United, Inc. Reservations MR. and MRS. W. H. ZEIGLER, Mgr.-Owner Phone 4277 Benne Wafers Charleston Specialties Pickled Shrimp Palmetto Pickles D. W. OHLANDT & SONS GROCERS 42 Meeting Street AAA Member Recommended Courtesy Court United Wayne Motor Court FOUR AND A HALF MILES SOUTH ON U.S. 17 Near World Famous Gardens TV In Rooms Telephone 6-2361 Room Telephones ■* 57 «■
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    Established 1888 263 KING STREET LEGERTON & CO., Inc. Charleston's Oldest and Largest Book Store Displaying a large collection of books on Charleston and South Carolina GREETING CARDS GIFTS Completely Air-Conditioned CHARLESTON SOUTH CARCUAA Open 7 Days Per Week—Noon to ;1 A.M. Contact Us For local sightseeing tours, guides, private cars, u.drive.it, and hotel reservations FORT SUMTER HOTEL ALL YOUR TRAVEL NEEDS Ruth W. McInnes Dial 2-4696 COLOR SLIDES OF CHARLESTON, HER HOMES AND GARDENS NORVELL/S CAMERA EXCHANGE CAROLINA'S COMPLETE CAMERA CENTER Francis Marion Hotel Phone 2-2113 SHRIMP-A-HOY SPECIALIZING IN SHRIMP AND STEAKS 122 KING STREET FREE PARKING BUFFET LUNCH * 58 «•
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    ANTIQUES JACK PATIA COMPANY 181 KING STREET TELEPHONE 5866 Fine Furniture — Silver — China — Paintings CITY AND COUNTRY REAL ESTATE AUTOMOBILE—FIRE—CASUALTY INSURANCE Jenkins Insurance Agency 28 BROAD ST. — TELEPHONE 2-7621 C. BISSELL JENKINS, JR. — JOHN T. JENKINS — RIVERS T. JENKINS Belk-Robinson Co. 'ZO&en.e tyou Tfteity S&ofi "Wctd. (^att^6eCe*tce" Successfully Servuuf the South Over 125 Years wMimiJMMmME OFFICI FUHNITURF. "-JI 3 BROAD STREET supplies * iquipment \7 CHARLESTON. S. C. PRINTERS OF THIS BOOKLET •* 59 «■
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    MRS. RICHARD CORNELL RHETT WAFFLES BREAKFAST - LUNCHEON . DINNER AFTERNOON TEA 72 CHURCH STREET PHONE 7780 marguerite sinkler valk a. i. a. Invites you to visit her Antique Shop attractively located in an 18th Century Charleston home Authentic Replicas of Fabrics and Wallpapers seven siolt s allei^ (OFF CHURCH ST., NEAR WATER) MT. PLEASANT, S. C. HIGHWAY 17 3 MILES NORTH OF HISTORIC CHARLESTON Kodachrome Slides of Charleston's Historic Houses For Sale at FOUNDATION HEADQUARTERS 94 CHURCH STREET ■* 60 *
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    On the Famous Battery Overlooking Charleston Harbor For Your Dining Pleasure Rampart Room Open 7 A.M. to 11 P.M. Don Grady FOOT OF KING STREET -* 61 *-
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    MIDDLETON GARDENS TEA ROOM LUNCHEON AND TEA 12:00 - 6:00 NO GARDEN TICKET REQUIRED TO ENTER TEA ROOM TELEPHONE 6-3651 ON U. S. 17—3 MILES SOUTH—CHARLESTON, S. C. OPENED FOR BUSINESS JUNE 1, 1952 ALL TILE BATHS—STEAM HEAT CONTINUOUS HOT WATER — AIR CONDITIONED Owned and operated by Mr. and Mrs. Joe E. Smith Phone 2-3673 COPLESTON'S LAUNDRY - CLEANERS 537 Meeting Street Your Pilgrimage Will Not Be Complete Without a Visit To Virginia Ckiioir, Holm. CHURCH AT WATER antiques and furnishings for traditional or contemporary houses paintings by charleston artists member american institute of decorators telephone 2-6772 •* 62 *
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    MAGNOLIA GARDENS Acclaimed by Experts as the WORLD'S MOST BEAUTIFUL GARDEN OPEN THANKSGIVING TO MAY Brewton Inn GUEST HOUSE 35 TRADD ST. — TEA ROOM 75 CHURCH ST. LUNCHEONS — TEAS — DINNERS A Southern inn of quiet charm and old time hospitality KATHRYN D. McNULTA Telephone 2-3487 Carolina Drive-Ur-Self, Inc. CAR & TRUCK RENTALS 157 MEETING ST. PHONE 3-4522 NEW CARS — POWER GLIDES — CONVERTIBLES PASTIME AMUSEMENT CO. OPERATING L^karledton 5 aLeadina ^JneatreA GLORIA — ARCADE — RIVIERA GARDEN — AMERICAN — ASHLEY ONE OF CHARLESTON'S MOST UNUSUAL GIFT SHOPS THE GOLDEN ACORN SAVANNAH HIGHWAY—JUST ACROSS THE ASHLEY Ocean Highway, U. S. 17, 2% mi. South of Charleston, S. C. MR. and MRS. DAN H. GROVES Mgr.—Owners Phone 3-2775 •* 63 «•
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    SQUIRREL INN SUMMERVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA BREAKFAST — LUNCHEON — DINNER EVERY ROOM WITH PRIVATE BATH EUGENE SUTTER—Owner-Manager TELEPHONE—Summerville 4431 TRAVELOUGE NEW DeLUXE TOURIST COURT Route 17, Three Miles N. of Charleston Opposite The Fork Restaurant HELEN F. POTTER PHONE 8-4184 Manager Mt. Pleasant, S. C. Middleton Gardens DATES FROM 1741 The Oldest Landscaped Garden in America OPEN EVERY DAY FOR THE ENTIRE YEAR 3etter""Things Fcr Men IN CATFISH ROW ON CHURCH STREET Women's Sportswear and Accessories The ffcat Cart Gifts—Both Old and New 4 64 *-
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Title:
Charleston's Historic Houses, 1954: Seventh Annual Tours Sponsored by Historic Charleston Foundation
Date:
1954
Description:
Descriptions and photographs of the historic houses on tour in 1954. Published by Historic Charleston Foundation, 1954; printed by Walker, Evans & Cogswell. Sixty-four pages. (Note: All a/k/a references pertain to the name of the house as listed in Jonathan Poston's book The Buildings of Charleston: A Guide to the City's Architecture; USC Press, 1997.)
Collection:
Historic Charleston Foundation's Tours of Homes
Contributing Institution:
Margaretta Childs Archives at Historic Charleston Foundation
Media Type:
Pamphlets
Personal or Corporate Subject:
Historic Charleston Foundation -- Tours
Topical Subject:
Architecture, Domestic -- South Carolina -- Charleston -- Guidebooks, Historic buildings -- South Carolina -- Charleston, Dwellings -- South Carolina -- Charleston
Geographic Subject:
Charleston (S.C.) -- Buildings, structures, etc., Low Country
Shelving Locator:
HCF.FOHG.001
S.C. County:
Charleston County (S.C.)
Material Type:
image/jpeg
Digitization Specifications:
301 ppi, 24-bit depth color, HP Scanjet 4890. Archival Masters are tiffs.
Copyright Status Statement:
Digital image copyright 2010, Historic Charleston Foundation. All rights reserved. For more information contact Margaretta Childs Archives at HCF, P.O. Box 1120, Charleston, SC 29402.