Letter from C.C. Tseng to Laura M. Bragg, June 28, 1928

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    June 28, 28 Camp McClellan Anniston, Ala. Dear Miss Bragg, I received your letter just before we went to the rifle range. We started for the range in the early morning about five o'clock and come back about six in the evening, and spend the night in cleaning the rifle. It is certainly a sweat-ing job. This afternoon I was sent back to camp as kitchin [sic] police and it is, therefore, possible for me to steal a little time to write this letter. [2] I failed in my record fire. Be-cause of two points less than the requir-ed number, I failed to be a marksman. But I still feel satisfied although luck and weather did not favor me. I learned a great deal more about how to fire a rifle than I (accomplished) actually did for the score. We will begin machine gun work next week. I am very glad to tell you that I am appointed to the machine gun instructor of our fire order. This is a great compensation to what I failed in rifle. Mr. An is qualified to be a marksman, still with ten more points than needed. I hope I can make up in machine gun record [3] fire. Last Sunday night I gave a long talk about the present situation, missionary works and Christianity in China in a church in Anniston. This came about because I like to chatter with the boys here from hea-ven to earth and from earth to hea-ven and therefore they rewarded me with that big job which cost me two sweating days for its preparation. The boys here treat us very fri-endly and also with respect, since we have presented ourseves quite faavorably to them and behave as one of them. Col. Cole, commander of the R.O.T.C. asked us to see him [4] last week and made a series of inter-esting questions, "Do you have enough to eat? Do you feel hot in the tent? How do the boys treat you? do you feel satisfied with the officers? If there is anything you don't like, come to see me or Major Miller." We also made a series of simple answers, "Yes, sir." These questions went straight to our hearts and his sincere care for us made us feel quite at home in this camp and among a large crowd of "foreigners." Chia Mei and Wen-Jo have gone to Plattsburg. I will soon write to them when I get a chance. I hope they feel satisfied as we do. [5] I never think that Chia Mei lacks affection for you. He is a typical Chinese boy. He is exactly of my type. The more our respect or affec-tion for somebody, the less will they be expressed in language, because they are too delicate and too scared for words and our heart is the only worthy place for treasuring them. We only express them in looks, in silence, in action and in future deeds. You may think that it is not natur-al, but if it is so we are at least trained that way for several thousand [6] years. Chia-Mei has left Charleston but his heart is always there. I am supposed to be one of his best friends. I know him perfectly. I have to give my thanks and feel grateful to Su-Chun, since he goes home every Sunday to see our "international mother," while we are too far away to fulfill our duty. I received several letters from Miss Lin since I came to camp. She had been sick and is recover-ing. She is now working with Mme.Tso [?] in advancing woman [sic] education in China and organizing country peasant women. Miss Lin is too dear to me. We have passed [7] through many hardships, obstacles and painful experiences together, and we have struggled shoulder by shoulder for ten years. We suffered together in the dark days; surely we will enjoy together in the time of our success. We thank you, Miss Bragg, for your sincere wishes. Boys are coming back. I have to go to work. I will continue this letter next time. I am, truly yours, I-Men. Please give my regards to all my Charleston friends. [8] [From] C.C.Tseng, McClellan Camp. Anniston, Ala. [Addressed] Miss Laura M. Bragg. 38 Chalmers Street, Charleston, S.C.
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    June 28, 28 Camp McClellan Anniston, Ala. Dear Miss Bragg, I received your letter just before we went to the rifle range. We started for the range in the early morning about five o'clock and come back about six in the evening, and spend the night in cleaning the rifle. It is certainly a sweat-ing job. This afternoon I was sent back to camp as kitchin [sic] police and it is, therefore, possible for me to steal a little time to write this letter. [2] I failed in my record fire. Be-cause of two points less than the requir-ed number, I failed to be a marksman. But I still feel satisfied although luck and weather did not favor me. I learned a great deal more about how to fire a rifle than I (accomplished) actually did for the score. We will begin machine gun work next week. I am very glad to tell you that I am appointed to the machine gun instructor of our fire order. This is a great compensation to what I failed in rifle. Mr. An is qualified to be a marksman, still with ten more points than needed. I hope I can make up in machine gun record [3] fire. Last Sunday night I gave a long talk about the present situation, missionary works and Christianity in China in a church in Anniston. This came about because I like to chatter with the boys here from hea-ven to earth and from earth to hea-ven and therefore they rewarded me with that big job which cost me two sweating days for its preparation. The boys here treat us very fri-endly and also with respect, since we have presented ourseves quite faavorably to them and behave as one of them. Col. Cole, commander of the R.O.T.C. asked us to see him [4] last week and made a series of inter-esting questions, "Do you have enough to eat? Do you feel hot in the tent? How do the boys treat you? do you feel satisfied with the officers? If there is anything you don't like, come to see me or Major Miller." We also made a series of simple answers, "Yes, sir." These questions went straight to our hearts and his sincere care for us made us feel quite at home in this camp and among a large crowd of "foreigners." Chia Mei and Wen-Jo have gone to Plattsburg. I will soon write to them when I get a chance. I hope they feel satisfied as we do. [5] I never think that Chia Mei lacks affection for you. He is a typical Chinese boy. He is exactly of my type. The more our respect or affec-tion for somebody, the less will they be expressed in language, because they are too delicate and too scared for words and our heart is the only worthy place for treasuring them. We only express them in looks, in silence, in action and in future deeds. You may think that it is not natur-al, but if it is so we are at least trained that way for several thousand [6] years. Chia-Mei has left Charleston but his heart is always there. I am supposed to be one of his best friends. I know him perfectly. I have to give my thanks and feel grateful to Su-Chun, since he goes home every Sunday to see our "international mother," while we are too far away to fulfill our duty. I received several letters from Miss Lin since I came to camp. She had been sick and is recover-ing. She is now working with Mme.Tso [?] in advancing woman [sic] education in China and organizing country peasant women. Miss Lin is too dear to me. We have passed [7] through many hardships, obstacles and painful experiences together, and we have struggled shoulder by shoulder for ten years. We suffered together in the dark days; surely we will enjoy together in the time of our success. We thank you, Miss Bragg, for your sincere wishes. Boys are coming back. I have to go to work. I will continue this letter next time. I am, truly yours, I-Men. Please give my regards to all my Charleston friends. [8] [From] C.C.Tseng, McClellan Camp. Anniston, Ala. [Addressed] Miss Laura M. Bragg. 38 Chalmers Street, Charleston, S.C.
  • Image 01
    June 28, 28 Camp McClellan Anniston, Ala. Dear Miss Bragg, I received your letter just before we went to the rifle range. We started for the range in the early morning about five o'clock and come back about six in the evening, and spend the night in cleaning the rifle. It is certainly a sweat-ing job. This afternoon I was sent back to camp as kitchin [sic] police and it is, therefore, possible for me to steal a little time to write this letter. [2] I failed in my record fire. Be-cause of two points less than the requir-ed number, I failed to be a marksman. But I still feel satisfied although luck and weather did not favor me. I learned a great deal more about how to fire a rifle than I (accomplished) actually did for the score. We will begin machine gun work next week. I am very glad to tell you that I am appointed to the machine gun instructor of our fire order. This is a great compensation to what I failed in rifle. Mr. An is qualified to be a marksman, still with ten more points than needed. I hope I can make up in machine gun record [3] fire. Last Sunday night I gave a long talk about the present situation, missionary works and Christianity in China in a church in Anniston. This came about because I like to chatter with the boys here from hea-ven to earth and from earth to hea-ven and therefore they rewarded me with that big job which cost me two sweating days for its preparation. The boys here treat us very fri-endly and also with respect, since we have presented ourseves quite faavorably to them and behave as one of them. Col. Cole, commander of the R.O.T.C. asked us to see him [4] last week and made a series of inter-esting questions, "Do you have enough to eat? Do you feel hot in the tent? How do the boys treat you? do you feel satisfied with the officers? If there is anything you don't like, come to see me or Major Miller." We also made a series of simple answers, "Yes, sir." These questions went straight to our hearts and his sincere care for us made us feel quite at home in this camp and among a large crowd of "foreigners." Chia Mei and Wen-Jo have gone to Plattsburg. I will soon write to them when I get a chance. I hope they feel satisfied as we do. [5] I never think that Chia Mei lacks affection for you. He is a typical Chinese boy. He is exactly of my type. The more our respect or affec-tion for somebody, the less will they be expressed in language, because they are too delicate and too scared for words and our heart is the only worthy place for treasuring them. We only express them in looks, in silence, in action and in future deeds. You may think that it is not natur-al, but if it is so we are at least trained that way for several thousand [6] years. Chia-Mei has left Charleston but his heart is always there. I am supposed to be one of his best friends. I know him perfectly. I have to give my thanks and feel grateful to Su-Chun, since he goes home every Sunday to see our "international mother," while we are too far away to fulfill our duty. I received several letters from Miss Lin since I came to camp. She had been sick and is recover-ing. She is now working with Mme.Tso [?] in advancing woman [sic] education in China and organizing country peasant women. Miss Lin is too dear to me. We have passed [7] through many hardships, obstacles and painful experiences together, and we have struggled shoulder by shoulder for ten years. We suffered together in the dark days; surely we will enjoy together in the time of our success. We thank you, Miss Bragg, for your sincere wishes. Boys are coming back. I have to go to work. I will continue this letter next time. I am, truly yours, I-Men. Please give my regards to all my Charleston friends. [8] [From] C.C.Tseng, McClellan Camp. Anniston, Ala. [Addressed] Miss Laura M. Bragg. 38 Chalmers Street, Charleston, S.C.
  • Image 01
    June 28, 28 Camp McClellan Anniston, Ala. Dear Miss Bragg, I received your letter just before we went to the rifle range. We started for the range in the early morning about five o'clock and come back about six in the evening, and spend the night in cleaning the rifle. It is certainly a sweat-ing job. This afternoon I was sent back to camp as kitchin [sic] police and it is, therefore, possible for me to steal a little time to write this letter. [2] I failed in my record fire. Be-cause of two points less than the requir-ed number, I failed to be a marksman. But I still feel satisfied although luck and weather did not favor me. I learned a great deal more about how to fire a rifle than I (accomplished) actually did for the score. We will begin machine gun work next week. I am very glad to tell you that I am appointed to the machine gun instructor of our fire order. This is a great compensation to what I failed in rifle. Mr. An is qualified to be a marksman, still with ten more points than needed. I hope I can make up in machine gun record [3] fire. Last Sunday night I gave a long talk about the present situation, missionary works and Christianity in China in a church in Anniston. This came about because I like to chatter with the boys here from hea-ven to earth and from earth to hea-ven and therefore they rewarded me with that big job which cost me two sweating days for its preparation. The boys here treat us very fri-endly and also with respect, since we have presented ourseves quite faavorably to them and behave as one of them. Col. Cole, commander of the R.O.T.C. asked us to see him [4] last week and made a series of inter-esting questions, "Do you have enough to eat? Do you feel hot in the tent? How do the boys treat you? do you feel satisfied with the officers? If there is anything you don't like, come to see me or Major Miller." We also made a series of simple answers, "Yes, sir." These questions went straight to our hearts and his sincere care for us made us feel quite at home in this camp and among a large crowd of "foreigners." Chia Mei and Wen-Jo have gone to Plattsburg. I will soon write to them when I get a chance. I hope they feel satisfied as we do. [5] I never think that Chia Mei lacks affection for you. He is a typical Chinese boy. He is exactly of my type. The more our respect or affec-tion for somebody, the less will they be expressed in language, because they are too delicate and too scared for words and our heart is the only worthy place for treasuring them. We only express them in looks, in silence, in action and in future deeds. You may think that it is not natur-al, but if it is so we are at least trained that way for several thousand [6] years. Chia-Mei has left Charleston but his heart is always there. I am supposed to be one of his best friends. I know him perfectly. I have to give my thanks and feel grateful to Su-Chun, since he goes home every Sunday to see our "international mother," while we are too far away to fulfill our duty. I received several letters from Miss Lin since I came to camp. She had been sick and is recover-ing. She is now working with Mme.Tso [?] in advancing woman [sic] education in China and organizing country peasant women. Miss Lin is too dear to me. We have passed [7] through many hardships, obstacles and painful experiences together, and we have struggled shoulder by shoulder for ten years. We suffered together in the dark days; surely we will enjoy together in the time of our success. We thank you, Miss Bragg, for your sincere wishes. Boys are coming back. I have to go to work. I will continue this letter next time. I am, truly yours, I-Men. Please give my regards to all my Charleston friends. [8] [From] C.C.Tseng, McClellan Camp. Anniston, Ala. [Addressed] Miss Laura M. Bragg. 38 Chalmers Street, Charleston, S.C.
  • Image 01
    June 28, 28 Camp McClellan Anniston, Ala. Dear Miss Bragg, I received your letter just before we went to the rifle range. We started for the range in the early morning about five o'clock and come back about six in the evening, and spend the night in cleaning the rifle. It is certainly a sweat-ing job. This afternoon I was sent back to camp as kitchin [sic] police and it is, therefore, possible for me to steal a little time to write this letter. [2] I failed in my record fire. Be-cause of two points less than the requir-ed number, I failed to be a marksman. But I still feel satisfied although luck and weather did not favor me. I learned a great deal more about how to fire a rifle than I (accomplished) actually did for the score. We will begin machine gun work next week. I am very glad to tell you that I am appointed to the machine gun instructor of our fire order. This is a great compensation to what I failed in rifle. Mr. An is qualified to be a marksman, still with ten more points than needed. I hope I can make up in machine gun record [3] fire. Last Sunday night I gave a long talk about the present situation, missionary works and Christianity in China in a church in Anniston. This came about because I like to chatter with the boys here from hea-ven to earth and from earth to hea-ven and therefore they rewarded me with that big job which cost me two sweating days for its preparation. The boys here treat us very fri-endly and also with respect, since we have presented ourseves quite faavorably to them and behave as one of them. Col. Cole, commander of the R.O.T.C. asked us to see him [4] last week and made a series of inter-esting questions, "Do you have enough to eat? Do you feel hot in the tent? How do the boys treat you? do you feel satisfied with the officers? If there is anything you don't like, come to see me or Major Miller." We also made a series of simple answers, "Yes, sir." These questions went straight to our hearts and his sincere care for us made us feel quite at home in this camp and among a large crowd of "foreigners." Chia Mei and Wen-Jo have gone to Plattsburg. I will soon write to them when I get a chance. I hope they feel satisfied as we do. [5] I never think that Chia Mei lacks affection for you. He is a typical Chinese boy. He is exactly of my type. The more our respect or affec-tion for somebody, the less will they be expressed in language, because they are too delicate and too scared for words and our heart is the only worthy place for treasuring them. We only express them in looks, in silence, in action and in future deeds. You may think that it is not natur-al, but if it is so we are at least trained that way for several thousand [6] years. Chia-Mei has left Charleston but his heart is always there. I am supposed to be one of his best friends. I know him perfectly. I have to give my thanks and feel grateful to Su-Chun, since he goes home every Sunday to see our "international mother," while we are too far away to fulfill our duty. I received several letters from Miss Lin since I came to camp. She had been sick and is recover-ing. She is now working with Mme.Tso [?] in advancing woman [sic] education in China and organizing country peasant women. Miss Lin is too dear to me. We have passed [7] through many hardships, obstacles and painful experiences together, and we have struggled shoulder by shoulder for ten years. We suffered together in the dark days; surely we will enjoy together in the time of our success. We thank you, Miss Bragg, for your sincere wishes. Boys are coming back. I have to go to work. I will continue this letter next time. I am, truly yours, I-Men. Please give my regards to all my Charleston friends. [8] [From] C.C.Tseng, McClellan Camp. Anniston, Ala. [Addressed] Miss Laura M. Bragg. 38 Chalmers Street, Charleston, S.C.
  • Image 01
    June 28, 28 Camp McClellan Anniston, Ala. Dear Miss Bragg, I received your letter just before we went to the rifle range. We started for the range in the early morning about five o'clock and come back about six in the evening, and spend the night in cleaning the rifle. It is certainly a sweat-ing job. This afternoon I was sent back to camp as kitchin [sic] police and it is, therefore, possible for me to steal a little time to write this letter. [2] I failed in my record fire. Be-cause of two points less than the requir-ed number, I failed to be a marksman. But I still feel satisfied although luck and weather did not favor me. I learned a great deal more about how to fire a rifle than I (accomplished) actually did for the score. We will begin machine gun work next week. I am very glad to tell you that I am appointed to the machine gun instructor of our fire order. This is a great compensation to what I failed in rifle. Mr. An is qualified to be a marksman, still with ten more points than needed. I hope I can make up in machine gun record [3] fire. Last Sunday night I gave a long talk about the present situation, missionary works and Christianity in China in a church in Anniston. This came about because I like to chatter with the boys here from hea-ven to earth and from earth to hea-ven and therefore they rewarded me with that big job which cost me two sweating days for its preparation. The boys here treat us very fri-endly and also with respect, since we have presented ourseves quite faavorably to them and behave as one of them. Col. Cole, commander of the R.O.T.C. asked us to see him [4] last week and made a series of inter-esting questions, "Do you have enough to eat? Do you feel hot in the tent? How do the boys treat you? do you feel satisfied with the officers? If there is anything you don't like, come to see me or Major Miller." We also made a series of simple answers, "Yes, sir." These questions went straight to our hearts and his sincere care for us made us feel quite at home in this camp and among a large crowd of "foreigners." Chia Mei and Wen-Jo have gone to Plattsburg. I will soon write to them when I get a chance. I hope they feel satisfied as we do. [5] I never think that Chia Mei lacks affection for you. He is a typical Chinese boy. He is exactly of my type. The more our respect or affec-tion for somebody, the less will they be expressed in language, because they are too delicate and too scared for words and our heart is the only worthy place for treasuring them. We only express them in looks, in silence, in action and in future deeds. You may think that it is not natur-al, but if it is so we are at least trained that way for several thousand [6] years. Chia-Mei has left Charleston but his heart is always there. I am supposed to be one of his best friends. I know him perfectly. I have to give my thanks and feel grateful to Su-Chun, since he goes home every Sunday to see our "international mother," while we are too far away to fulfill our duty. I received several letters from Miss Lin since I came to camp. She had been sick and is recover-ing. She is now working with Mme.Tso [?] in advancing woman [sic] education in China and organizing country peasant women. Miss Lin is too dear to me. We have passed [7] through many hardships, obstacles and painful experiences together, and we have struggled shoulder by shoulder for ten years. We suffered together in the dark days; surely we will enjoy together in the time of our success. We thank you, Miss Bragg, for your sincere wishes. Boys are coming back. I have to go to work. I will continue this letter next time. I am, truly yours, I-Men. Please give my regards to all my Charleston friends. [8] [From] C.C.Tseng, McClellan Camp. Anniston, Ala. [Addressed] Miss Laura M. Bragg. 38 Chalmers Street, Charleston, S.C.
  • Image 01
    June 28, 28 Camp McClellan Anniston, Ala. Dear Miss Bragg, I received your letter just before we went to the rifle range. We started for the range in the early morning about five o'clock and come back about six in the evening, and spend the night in cleaning the rifle. It is certainly a sweat-ing job. This afternoon I was sent back to camp as kitchin [sic] police and it is, therefore, possible for me to steal a little time to write this letter. [2] I failed in my record fire. Be-cause of two points less than the requir-ed number, I failed to be a marksman. But I still feel satisfied although luck and weather did not favor me. I learned a great deal more about how to fire a rifle than I (accomplished) actually did for the score. We will begin machine gun work next week. I am very glad to tell you that I am appointed to the machine gun instructor of our fire order. This is a great compensation to what I failed in rifle. Mr. An is qualified to be a marksman, still with ten more points than needed. I hope I can make up in machine gun record [3] fire. Last Sunday night I gave a long talk about the present situation, missionary works and Christianity in China in a church in Anniston. This came about because I like to chatter with the boys here from hea-ven to earth and from earth to hea-ven and therefore they rewarded me with that big job which cost me two sweating days for its preparation. The boys here treat us very fri-endly and also with respect, since we have presented ourseves quite faavorably to them and behave as one of them. Col. Cole, commander of the R.O.T.C. asked us to see him [4] last week and made a series of inter-esting questions, "Do you have enough to eat? Do you feel hot in the tent? How do the boys treat you? do you feel satisfied with the officers? If there is anything you don't like, come to see me or Major Miller." We also made a series of simple answers, "Yes, sir." These questions went straight to our hearts and his sincere care for us made us feel quite at home in this camp and among a large crowd of "foreigners." Chia Mei and Wen-Jo have gone to Plattsburg. I will soon write to them when I get a chance. I hope they feel satisfied as we do. [5] I never think that Chia Mei lacks affection for you. He is a typical Chinese boy. He is exactly of my type. The more our respect or affec-tion for somebody, the less will they be expressed in language, because they are too delicate and too scared for words and our heart is the only worthy place for treasuring them. We only express them in looks, in silence, in action and in future deeds. You may think that it is not natur-al, but if it is so we are at least trained that way for several thousand [6] years. Chia-Mei has left Charleston but his heart is always there. I am supposed to be one of his best friends. I know him perfectly. I have to give my thanks and feel grateful to Su-Chun, since he goes home every Sunday to see our "international mother," while we are too far away to fulfill our duty. I received several letters from Miss Lin since I came to camp. She had been sick and is recover-ing. She is now working with Mme.Tso [?] in advancing woman [sic] education in China and organizing country peasant women. Miss Lin is too dear to me. We have passed [7] through many hardships, obstacles and painful experiences together, and we have struggled shoulder by shoulder for ten years. We suffered together in the dark days; surely we will enjoy together in the time of our success. We thank you, Miss Bragg, for your sincere wishes. Boys are coming back. I have to go to work. I will continue this letter next time. I am, truly yours, I-Men. Please give my regards to all my Charleston friends. [8] [From] C.C.Tseng, McClellan Camp. Anniston, Ala. [Addressed] Miss Laura M. Bragg. 38 Chalmers Street, Charleston, S.C.
  • Image 01
    June 28, 28 Camp McClellan Anniston, Ala. Dear Miss Bragg, I received your letter just before we went to the rifle range. We started for the range in the early morning about five o'clock and come back about six in the evening, and spend the night in cleaning the rifle. It is certainly a sweat-ing job. This afternoon I was sent back to camp as kitchin [sic] police and it is, therefore, possible for me to steal a little time to write this letter. [2] I failed in my record fire. Be-cause of two points less than the requir-ed number, I failed to be a marksman. But I still feel satisfied although luck and weather did not favor me. I learned a great deal more about how to fire a rifle than I (accomplished) actually did for the score. We will begin machine gun work next week. I am very glad to tell you that I am appointed to the machine gun instructor of our fire order. This is a great compensation to what I failed in rifle. Mr. An is qualified to be a marksman, still with ten more points than needed. I hope I can make up in machine gun record [3] fire. Last Sunday night I gave a long talk about the present situation, missionary works and Christianity in China in a church in Anniston. This came about because I like to chatter with the boys here from hea-ven to earth and from earth to hea-ven and therefore they rewarded me with that big job which cost me two sweating days for its preparation. The boys here treat us very fri-endly and also with respect, since we have presented ourseves quite faavorably to them and behave as one of them. Col. Cole, commander of the R.O.T.C. asked us to see him [4] last week and made a series of inter-esting questions, "Do you have enough to eat? Do you feel hot in the tent? How do the boys treat you? do you feel satisfied with the officers? If there is anything you don't like, come to see me or Major Miller." We also made a series of simple answers, "Yes, sir." These questions went straight to our hearts and his sincere care for us made us feel quite at home in this camp and among a large crowd of "foreigners." Chia Mei and Wen-Jo have gone to Plattsburg. I will soon write to them when I get a chance. I hope they feel satisfied as we do. [5] I never think that Chia Mei lacks affection for you. He is a typical Chinese boy. He is exactly of my type. The more our respect or affec-tion for somebody, the less will they be expressed in language, because they are too delicate and too scared for words and our heart is the only worthy place for treasuring them. We only express them in looks, in silence, in action and in future deeds. You may think that it is not natur-al, but if it is so we are at least trained that way for several thousand [6] years. Chia-Mei has left Charleston but his heart is always there. I am supposed to be one of his best friends. I know him perfectly. I have to give my thanks and feel grateful to Su-Chun, since he goes home every Sunday to see our "international mother," while we are too far away to fulfill our duty. I received several letters from Miss Lin since I came to camp. She had been sick and is recover-ing. She is now working with Mme.Tso [?] in advancing woman [sic] education in China and organizing country peasant women. Miss Lin is too dear to me. We have passed [7] through many hardships, obstacles and painful experiences together, and we have struggled shoulder by shoulder for ten years. We suffered together in the dark days; surely we will enjoy together in the time of our success. We thank you, Miss Bragg, for your sincere wishes. Boys are coming back. I have to go to work. I will continue this letter next time. I am, truly yours, I-Men. Please give my regards to all my Charleston friends. [8] [From] C.C.Tseng, McClellan Camp. Anniston, Ala. [Addressed] Miss Laura M. Bragg. 38 Chalmers Street, Charleston, S.C.
Title:
Letter from C.C. Tseng to Laura M. Bragg, June 28, 1928
Creator:
Tseng, Ching-Chi
Date:
1928-06-28
Description:
In this seven-page handwritten letter C.C. Tseng disusses life at military camp, marksmanship training, Chia Mei's feelings, Su Chun, and questions made to him by Colonel Cole, R.O.T.C. commander.
Collection:
Laura Bragg Papers
Contributing Institution:
The Citadel Archives & Museum
Media Type:
Manuscripts
Personal or Corporate Subject:
Bragg, Laura M. (Laura Mary), 1881-1978, Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina
Topical Subject:
Military training camps
Geographic Subject:
Camp McClellan (Ala.)
Language:
English
Shelving Locator:
Bragg Box 5 Folder 1-004
Internet Media Type:
image/jpeg
Digitization Specifications:
600 dpi, 24-bit depth, color, Epson Expression 10000XL, Archival masters are tiffs.
Copyright Status Statement:
Copyright © The Citadel Archives and Museum.
Access Information:
For more information contact The Citadel Archives and Museum at Daniel Library, The Citadel, 171 Moultrie Street, Charleston, SC 29409.