College of Charleston

Lawrence Layden Scrapbook, 1941-1945

Lawrence Layden Scrapbook, 1941-1945
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Joe Engel Papers, 1938-2006

Joe Engel Papers, 1938-2006
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Harry Blas and Erika Stockfleth Blas Papers, circa 1910-circa 1980

Harry Blas and Erika Stockfleth Blas Papers, circa 1910-circa 1980
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Francine Ajzensztark Taylor Papers, circa 1913-1985

Francine Ajzensztark Taylor Papers, circa 1913-1985
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Dientje Krant Kalisky Adkins Photographs, 1938-1996

Dientje Krant Kalisky Adkins Photographs, 1938-1996

The Dientje Krant Kalisky Adkins Photographs is a collection of, mostly black and white, family photographs. The most photographed subjects include Dientje Krant, Gabriel DeLeeuw, and Roosje Krant. The last few photographs are color photos from 1950, 1967, and 1996, the latter of the entire family on Dientje's parents 60th wedding anniversary in Charleston, South Carolina. 

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Charles Cross Collection of Buchenwald Concentration Camp Photographs, 1945

Charles Cross Collection of Buchenwald Concentration Camp Photographs, 1945

The Charles Cross Collection of Buchenwald Concentration Camp Photographs, 1945 is a collection of black and white photographs taken shortly after the liberation of Buchenwald Concentration Camp. Photographs include images of liberated inmates, a memorial dedicated ot those who died at Buchenwald, and displays of the living conditions of the concentration camp.

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Roswell T. Logan Journal, 1852-1865

Roswell T. Logan Journal, 1852-1865

Roswell T. Logan's Journal, 1852-1865, begins in 1852 with an address before his Charleston High School debate club, the Philomathic Society. Among the many speeches, poems and essays included in the journal are three essays published in the Charleston College Magazine: "Mohammed and His religion" and "College life" in the April 1855 issue and "Goodbye" in May 1855. Poems include a requiem to Logan's old horse John Randolph and a commentary on the contentious election of 1860 titled "The Presidential canvas of 1860." In his last dated entry, July 11th, 1865, Logan says goodbye to his beloved journal with the poem "Farewell to this Book."

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Journal of Charles Cotesworth Pinckney's plantations, 1818-1819

Journal of Charles Cotesworth Pinckney's plantations, 1818-1819

The Charles Cotesworth Pinckney Journal (1818 April 6-May 16, with a few scattered entries in late 1818 and early 1819) consists of journal entries on pages interleaved in Hoff's Agricultural Almanac (1818). The journal records daily activities on Pinckney's plantation. Pinckney not only planted cotton, sweet potatoes, Irish potatoes, corn, and oats, but relied heavily on fish for food. Several pages of the journal contain a list of slaves at "The Crescent," "the old Place," "the Point," and Pinckney Island.

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John F. Riley Papers, 1849-1855

John F. Riley Papers, 1849-1855

Collection consists of papers, including a handwritten "Journal" [diary], exercises, and lecture notes written by physician, J.F.R. The diary commences at New Orleans, Louisiana and includes entries about classes, students, and faculty at the medical department of the University of Louisiana. In May 1853 the author became the medical officer on the steamer Falcon and traveled to Panama, New Granada, Havana (includes descriptions of the houses and customs), and New York (with a stop in Charleston, S.C.). In New York he appeared before the Board of Medical Examiners to obtain a permit, then went to Philadelphia for two months until he obtained his results. After obtaining his permit the author proceeded to Washington, then was ordered to report to New Orleans and was assigned (March 1854) to the military asylum at East Pascagoula, Mississippi. When this branch was broken up in 1855 and the inmates were transferred to Harrodsburg, Kentucky, the author was briefly put in charge of the remaining men. Entries for October 1855 describe the author's passage on the Ben Franklin (ship) from New Orleans to Louisville, and the people he encounters.

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