• John R. Beaty Letters

    John R. Beaty Letters

  • Samuel Pope, Seamen's Protection Certificate, 1820

    Samuel Pope, Seamen's Protection Certificate, 1820

  • U.S. Engineer Maps of the Waccamaw River, 1903

    U.S. Engineer Maps of the Waccamaw River, 1903

  • Confederate Military Correspondence

    Confederate Military Correspondence

Coastal Carolina University, Horry County Archives Center

Samuel Pope, Seaman's Protection Certificate, 1820

Samuel Pope, Seaman's Protection Certificate, 1820

This document is an example of an American Seaman's Protection Certificate. In 1796, the Fourth U.S. Congress authorized Seamen's Protection Certificates (SPCs) to protect American merchant seamen from impressment into the British Navy. The British believed that they could force British seamen in port or on the high seas into service and it was common for them to impress any English-speaking sailors. The documents basically served as "merchant seamen's passports". The impressment of American seamen into service of the British Navy was one of the causes of the War of1812. This SPC was issued to Samuel Pope on September 1, 1820 by Joseph Storer, Collector for the District of Kennebunk, Maine. Capt. Samuel Pope, who was born in Wells, Maine in 1800/01 is believed to have moved to Horry District, South Carolina in the 1830s, where in 1837 he and a partner, Henry Buck, purchased 432 acres on the Waccamaw River at Murdock Landing where they established "Pope's Mill", a steam powered saw mill. He eventually sold his interest in "Pope's Mill" to Buck, and Murdock Landing later became known as Bucksport. Capt. Pope moved upriver to the village of Conwayborough where he established a shipyard. In 1856 Capt. Samuel Pope was elected mayor, then called "intendent", of "Conwayboro". He died in 1863 and was buried in the old village burial ground beside Kingston Presbyterian Church, of which he was a founder, in what is now known as Conway, South Carolina.

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U.S. Engineer Maps of the Waccamaw River, 1903

U.S. Engineer Maps of the Waccamaw River, 1903

This collection contains five maps of the Waccamaw River in Horry County, S.C. from Conway to Bull Creek dated November 1903. The surveys were performed under the direction of Captain G. P. Howell, Corps of Engineers U.S.A. and Reid Whitford, U.S. Assistant Engineer. The surveyor was William H. Johnstone. These five maps show the soundings and some of the place names along the river. Also shown are proposed "cuts" that would straighten out parts of the river where extreme twists and turns made navigation by larger vessels difficult. The total distance shown by way of the river is approximately 26.5 miles.

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Confederate Military Correspondence

Confederate Military Correspondence

This collection contains correspondence dealing with the Confederate military. Collection highlights include a letter from General P. G. T. Beauregard to South Carolina Governor M. L. Bonham in 1863; a letter from Colonel Edward Manigault to South Carolina Governor F. W. Pickens in 1861; and a letter from Captain T. W. Daggett to South Carolina Governor F. W. Pickens in 1861.

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Atheneum: Yearbook of Coastal Carolina University

Atheneum: Yearbook of Coastal Carolina University

Atheneum, the Coastal Carolina University yearbook, was published from 1969 to 1997. The yearbooks allow us to trace change in the culture and attitudes of students on the CCU campus throughout the years. The 1969 yearbook is considered to be the first volume because previous editions were included as part of Garnet and Black, the University of South Carolina's yearbook. The yearbooks contain information on university administration, student organizations, student life, university sports, student and staff yearbook pictures and much more. This collection is searchable and is scanned in high-resolution, so feel free to find someone specific or just browse through the collection. We hope you enjoy this fascinating look through Coastal Carolina University's past.

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John R. Beaty Letters

John R. Beaty Letters

The John R. Beaty Letters is a collection of thirteen letters dated from August 18, 1860 to February 8, 1862 and four undated letters written in that same time period. Beaty was born in Conwayborough (Conway), South Carolina on August 16, 1827 and died in February, 1865. The first three letters, written in August 1860 to his friend and relative Dr. James Henry Norman, are his colorful descriptions of a trip from Conwayborough to the South Carolina upstate resort of Williamston Spring prior to the secession of South Carolina from the Union on December 20, 1860. The rest of the letters are written to his wife, Melvina (Melly), his daughter, Isabella (Isa) and his son, Edgar (Ned, Edy) during the War Between the States. Those letters describe Confederate military camp life on North Island and Cat Island, located at the mouth of Winyah Bay in Georgetown District, South Carolina, and his inquires about the state of affairs at home in Conwayborough. At the time, Beaty was a 2nd Lieutenant in Company B (Brooks Rifle Guards), 10th South Carolina Infantry Regiment, Manigault’s Brigade. In March, 1862 the regiment was sent to Mississippi and in May, 1862 it was reorganized. John R. Beaty died in February, 1865 at his home in Conwayborough after being severely wounded by friendly-fire received when he and others went out in the night to defend the town from a threatened attack by lawless armed deserters who were raiding citizens throughout Horry and the surrounding districts. 

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