Manuscripts

Journal of Charles Cotesworth Pinckney's plantations, 1818-1819

Journal of Charles Cotesworth Pinckney's plantations, 1818-1819

The Charles Cotesworth Pinckney Journal (1818 April 6-May 16, with a few scattered entries in late 1818 and early 1819) consists of journal entries on pages interleaved in Hoff's Agricultural Almanac (1818). The journal records daily activities on Pinckney's plantation. Pinckney not only planted cotton, sweet potatoes, Irish potatoes, corn, and oats, but relied heavily on fish for food. Several pages of the journal contain a list of slaves at "The Crescent," "the old Place," "the Point," and Pinckney Island.

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John F. Riley Papers, 1849-1855

John F. Riley Papers, 1849-1855

Collection consists of papers, including a handwritten "Journal" [diary], exercises, and lecture notes written by physician, J.F.R. The diary commences at New Orleans, Louisiana and includes entries about classes, students, and faculty at the medical department of the University of Louisiana. In May 1853 the author became the medical officer on the steamer Falcon and traveled to Panama, New Granada, Havana (includes descriptions of the houses and customs), and New York (with a stop in Charleston, S.C.). In New York he appeared before the Board of Medical Examiners to obtain a permit, then went to Philadelphia for two months until he obtained his results. After obtaining his permit the author proceeded to Washington, then was ordered to report to New Orleans and was assigned (March 1854) to the military asylum at East Pascagoula, Mississippi. When this branch was broken up in 1855 and the inmates were transferred to Harrodsburg, Kentucky, the author was briefly put in charge of the remaining men. Entries for October 1855 describe the author's passage on the Ben Franklin (ship) from New Orleans to Louisville, and the people he encounters.

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Vincent P. Lannie Collection, 1733-1974

Vincent P. Lannie Collection, 1733-1974

The Vincent P. Lannie Collection consists of five separate manuscripts by plantation owner Elizabeth Allston Pringle: (1) Partial draft of a chapter ("Baby Woes") from "Chronicles of Chicora Wood." (2) A story entitled "The Innocents at Home and the Furniture Fiend Abroad" written under her pen name, Patience Pennington, and intended to be the first in a series of "Peaceville Happenings." (3) A story entitled "My Dogs" for a projected series of "Plantation Sketches." (4) An incomplete rough draft of an untitled short story about Pompey Green and his disobedient wife Doll. (5) Miscellaneous notes on owners of plantations on the Pee Dee, Waccamaw and Black Rivers, with the fullest notes on White House Plantation.

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Small-Whaley Family Papers, 1796-1994

Small-Whaley Family Papers, 1796-1994

The Diary of a Voyage to China, 1850-1851, the private diary of Captain Thomas Small, reveals the intense loneliness of command and details the longing he feels for the wife and newborn son he left behind. He comments on marriage, child-rearing, and religion, and frequently expresses his desire to find employment "ashore" to better provide for his family. In addition to these personal entries, he provides rich details of a mid-nineteenth century life at sea. Daily nautical annotations are augmented with comments about the crew, rations, frequent communications with passing ships, and his waning hope in obtaining a profitable cargo of tea in China.

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Charles Fraser Book of Precedents, 1800-1819

Charles Fraser Book of Precedents, 1800-1819

Charles Fraser's Book of Precedents, 1800-1819, was apparently handwritten by Charleston miniaturist Fraser as a reference work for his legal studies. Compiled mostly from 1800 -1807, the book contains copies of writs, pleas and judgments and includes cases adjudicated from 1736-1819, almost all of which were heard in Charleston district courts.

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Thomas J. Tobias Papers, ca. 1790-1970

Thomas J. Tobias Papers, ca. 1790-1970

The Thomas J. Tobias Papers contain six diaries written by three members of the same family, in the mid-19th century. The Joseph Lyons diary (1833-1834), written when he was between the ages of 19-21, contains Lyons' ruminations on his future career, his beliefs on state's rights, some poetry, and his thoughts on his Jewish faith. Joseph Lyons' nephew, David Henry Mordecai, wrote in four diaries between 1849 and 1858, detailing his travels to Cuba and the Florida Keys, in addition to extensive travels through Europe, and his treatment for tuberculosis. After David Henry Mordecai's death from tuberculosis in 1859, his sister Hortensia journalized her travels in Europe with her family and her diary records her thoughts on art and other sightseeing in Italy, Germany, and France.

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Reverend Alexander Glennie Meteorological Observations, 1834-1880

 Reverend Alexander Glennie Meteorological Observations, 1834-1880

Bound volumes containing charts (graphs and tables) pertaining to weather and the meteorological observations of Alexander Glennie taken in All Saints Parish and at Georgetown, South Carolina.
Glennie's records include thermographic, hygrometric, and barometric readings, as well as the number of inches of rainfall each day. Charts note the wind direction and velocity and include observations about the weather (fine, cloudy, variable, loud thunder, and similar remarks). Selected observations were made three times during the day. Volumes 1-6 (1830-1843, 1844-1849, 1849-1852, 1853-1857, 1858-1862, and 1863-1880) contain daily records for All Saints Parish. Volume 7 (1838-1867) contains monthly averages for All Saints Parish. Volume 8 (1868-1880) contains daily records for Georgetown.

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Burton L. Padoll Papers, 1957-2009

Sermons, addresses, photographs, publications, and other papers of Burton L. Padoll, rabbi and civil rights activist. The bulk of the collection consists of Padoll's typed and handwritten sermons and addresses from his various rabbinates, including at Charleston's Kahal Kadosh Beth Elohim. Topics include the Sabbath and High Holy Days celebrations as well as civil rights and other pertinent issues of the period. The collection also includes photographs of Padoll and his family, newspaper clippings announcing his retirement, and an article about Padoll's civil rights activism in Charleston written by Solomon Breibart in 2009.

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Zionist Organization of America Records - Charleston Chapter

Return letter from Mayor Lockwood to the Zionist Organization of America, 1944

The minutes (1917-1933 with a gap from May 1922-November 1923; and 1940-1944) cover all the special and regular meetings of the organization. Members attending are listed and there are various lists throughout the volume, detailing the approximately 100 or so men and women who belonged. Topics were discussed, at first, in both Yiddish and English. Dues were collected and there are frequent mentions of the need to raise more funds for specific causes, and the need to energize the populations of Charleston and South Carolina for Zionism.

 

There were many debates about which larger organization with which to affiliate, the Zionist Organization of America, or the world organization with the group deciding on the former. The Orthodox Zionist organization, the Mizrahi, is also mentioned and funds were raised for it. Much debate centered on which agencies should be supported with the group working for both Keren Hayesod (The Palestine Foundation Fund), and organizations closer to home, such as the Talmud Torah, or local Hebrew School. Often joining the group meetings are members of the women's organization Hadassah.

 

There are numerous reports of election of officers, and delegates to attend national conventions who report back on activities there. The earlier minutes make distinctions between Charleston's "uptown" and "downtown" Jews, the newer arrivals and those more settled, but by the beginning 1930s, such gradations are not mentioned, as the organization works for, among other things, the founding and prospering of the youth group, Aleph Zadik Aleph.

 

There are members present from all three local congregations, Kahal Kadosh Beth Elohim, Brith Sholom, and Beth Israel, with the latter two predominating. Prominent members and officers included Samuel Rittenberg, Rabbi Jacob S. Raisin, Joseph Hepler, Louis Shimel, Rabbi Menahem Mendel Horowitz, Harry Simonhoff, Joseph Goldman, and others. Later minutes (1940-1944) are typed, and loose, with financial reconciliations, and reports of delegates to national meetings. Included as well is one undated, ca. 1947, note re a day of prayer for Jews in Palestine.

 

With no history available, all that is known of this organization comes from the bound volume and the accompanying papers. The Zionist Organization of America (Charleston, S.C.) was active in 1917 when the minutes begin and continued through the 1940s. With members from the orthodox and reform congregations, its goal was to encourage and promote the creation of a Jewish homeland in Palestine. The organization is known alternately in the minutes as Bnei Zion and the Charleston Zionist Society.

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