Manuscripts

Nathaniel Russel Middleton Papers, 1823-1881

Nathaniel Russel Middleton Papers, 1823-1881

Nathaniel Russel Middleton's writings consist of poems, essays, and addresses about Christianity, the fine arts, philosophical materialism, temperance, secession, fame, the U.S. Constitution, and other subjects, many of which were probably delivered to the students of the College of Charleston during his tenure there as professor and president.

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John C. Calhoun Letters, 1824-1850

John C. Calhoun Letters, 1824-1850

In this collection are 23 letters written by John Caldwell Calhoun between the years 1824 and 1850. The majority of these letters were written during Calhoun’s second term as South Carolina’s U.S. Senator.  Calhoun divulges his political concerns with confidant Henry Workman Conner, who at the time was the president of the Bank of Charleston, over such matters as the Mexican-American War, the Wilmot proviso, abolition and its supporters, Zachary Taylor’s presidential election, and his political beliefs of nullification and concurrent majority.  His concern for his own state of South Carolina, as well as the South, in general, is clearly displayed throughout these personal correspondences.  Also included are two letters written at later dates in reference to this collection.

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Alexander Glennie Journal, 1831-1859

Alexander Glennie Journal, 1831-1859

Journal kept by Alexander Glennie concerning his activities as rector of All Saints (Episcopal) Church, Waccamaw, South Carolina. Includes a list of plantation chapels (Woodbourne, Laurel Hill, Brookgreen, Oaks, Litchfield, Waverly, Midway, True Blue, Hagley, Fairfield, Sandy Knoll, Cedar Grove, and Mount Arena); the constitution (1832) and minutes (1832-1838) of All Saints Sunday School (an auxiliary of the Diocesan Sunday School Society of South Carolina); and a circular.  The bulk of Glennie's journal contains the names of churches and plantations visited and the names of people (both free and enslaved) for whom he performed marriage, baptism, funeral, and other religious ceremonies/sacrament. Occasional summaries of the number of communicants served and financial support received are also included. A printed circular (1831), "Constitution of the Diocesan Sunday Society School of South-Carolina," is attached to the inside front over of the volume.

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Gertrude Sanford Legendre Papers, 1836-2000

Gertrude Sanford Legendre Papers, 1836-2000

Gertrude Sanford Legendre (1902–2000) was an American socialite who served as an OSS operative during World War II. She was also a noted explorer, big-game hunter, environmentalist, and owner of Medway plantation in South Carolina.

The collection includes scrapbooks of Gertrude’s travels and family life, loose photographs ranging in date from the mid to late 19th century to the 21st century (including slides, negatives, and multiple other formats), motion picture film, manuscript material including correspondence and business records, and a small amount of published material.
 

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Esau Jenkins Papers, 1963-2003

Esau Jenkins Papers, 1963-2003

Esau Jenkins (1910-1972) was born and raised on Johns Island, South Carolina. With very little formal education, he became a businessman and civil rights leader. Jenkins founded the Progressive Club in 1948, which encouraged local African Americans to register to vote, through the aid of Citizenship Schools, a topic he was educated in by his attendance at Highlander Folk Center in Tennessee. In 1959, he organized the Citizens' Committee of Charleston County dedicated to the economic, cultural and political improvement of local African Americans.

Printed material, correspondence, photographic materials, and literary productions (1963-2003) document the life and works of Esau Jenkins (1910-1972). Writings holds miscellaneous correspondence and notes and printed versions of his talks and writings. Affiliations contains correspondence, brochures, notes, and other data on variety of organizations he helped found or was a member of, including the Progressive Club, Citizen's Committee of Charleston, Community Organization Credit Union, Political Action Committee of Charleston County, Political Awareness League of Charleston County, and the Highlander Folks Center. Topics mentioned include the 1969 Charleston Hospital Worker's strike, and the protested death of a young African American, Robert Brown, killed by a white policeman in 1970.

This collection was digitized and made freely accessible online through the generous support of the National Historical Publications & Records Commission.

 

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Philip Simmons Collection

Philip Simmons with ironwork

Philip Simmons (1912-2009) was an African American blacksmith and artisan specializing in the craft of ironwork in Charleston, South Carolina. Simmons spent seventy-seven years crafting utilitarian and ornamental ironwork. His work is recognized within the state of South Carolina, nationally, and internationally.  This collection, donated by the Philip Simmons Foundation, holds personal papers with photographs and business related documents from 1977-2007. The bulk of materials feature preparatory graphite drawings (originals and photocopies) of commissioned works and estimates of Simmons' decorative ironwork (1984-2004, and undated).

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Newton Plantation Collection

This collection details the inner workings of Newton Plantation in the 1800s and contains several account and transaction ledgers. Specifically, this collection includes several day books (including the Newton Day Book or the Newton Plantation Day Book) originating between 1854-1872. These books provide records of monetary transactions on the plantation, including accounts payable and accounts receivable.  This collection also includes the Newton Slave List, 1828, which records the names of slaves and their respective occupations on the plantation during that year. Additionally, the collection includes the Newton Plantation Cash Books from 1869-1873, a Stock Keepers and Watchmen book from 1862, and an 1849 Sugar Book, which contains records of sugar, rum, and molasses production on the plantation.

Newton Plantation is located in the parish of Christ Church in southern Barbados, and was first established by Samuel Newton in the 1660s. From the seventeenth to the eighteenth centuries, Newton was a major sugar plantation worked by enslaved people. In addition to the significant documentary record featured in this digital collection, this plantation was also the site of the Newton Burial Ground for enslaved people. Drs. Jerome Handler and Frederick Lange investigated and excavated this site in the 1970s, and their research formed the basis for Plantation Slavery in Barbados, a book published by Harvard University Press in 1978. These scholars estimate that roughly one thousand enslaved people died on Newton Plantation between 1670 and 1833, and they believed that an estimated 570 individuals are interred at the Newton Burial Ground. As part of its mandate, the Barbados Museum and Historical Society (BMHS) acquired the land where the Newton Burial Ground is located in the 1990s, and the museum is committed to the site’s protection and preservation for the people of Barbados and the region.

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South Carolinians at Work

South Carolinians Historical Society- South Carolina at Work

The South Carolina Historical Society's South Carolinians at Work collection is comprised of correspondence and other records, constitutions, and by-laws of organizations in Charleston, South Carolina. The organizations include Charleston Iron Works, American Federation of Musicians Local 502, Mechanics' Union No. 1, Charleston Fire Department, and the Bricklayers, Masons and Plasterers International Union of America. Also included in the collection are several documents of apprenticeship indenture, receipts, and advertisements.

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Isaiah Bennett Papers, ca. 1932-2002

Isaiah Bennett Papers, ca. 1932-2002

The collection contains, primarily, the correspondence of Isaiah Bennett, President of the Charleston Chapter of the A. Philip Randolph Institute. Isaiah Bennett (1926-2002) served as a union representative for tobacco workers at the American Tobacco Company's "Cigar Factory" and as a leader and negotiator of the Charleston Hospital Workers' Strike of 1969. Bennett also founded and was president of the Charleston chapter of the A. Phillip Randolph Institute, an umbrella organization for black trade unions. Topics include Bennett's campaign for Charleston County Council in 1980, primary and secondary source material on the Charleston Hospital Workers' Strike of 1969 and includes correspondence between Bennett and other leaders of the strike, news releases regarding the national 1945 Tobacco Workers' Strike, and correspondence, minutes, and bylaws of the Charleston Chapter of the A. Philip Randolph Institute.

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The Fundamental Constitutions of Carolina, 1669

The Fundamental Constitutions of Carolina, 1669

One of a number of versions, the 1669 Fundamental Constitutions was a theoretical instrument of rule. These documents, attributed to the young philosopher John Locke, provided for a feudal system in the new colony, with colonial nobility carrying hereditary titles such as "cacique" and "landgrave," and the eight proprietors forming the highest level of rule.  It was adopted in March 1669 by the eight Lords Proprietor of the Province of Carolina.

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