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John F. Riley Papers, 1849-1855

John F. Riley Papers, 1849-1855

Collection consists of papers, including a handwritten "Journal" [diary], exercises, and lecture notes written by physician, J.F.R. The diary commences at New Orleans, Louisiana and includes entries about classes, students, and faculty at the medical department of the University of Louisiana. In May 1853 the author became the medical officer on the steamer Falcon and traveled to Panama, New Granada, Havana (includes descriptions of the houses and customs), and New York (with a stop in Charleston, S.C.). In New York he appeared before the Board of Medical Examiners to obtain a permit, then went to Philadelphia for two months until he obtained his results. After obtaining his permit the author proceeded to Washington, then was ordered to report to New Orleans and was assigned (March 1854) to the military asylum at East Pascagoula, Mississippi. When this branch was broken up in 1855 and the inmates were transferred to Harrodsburg, Kentucky, the author was briefly put in charge of the remaining men. Entries for October 1855 describe the author's passage on the Ben Franklin (ship) from New Orleans to Louisville, and the people he encounters.

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Vincent P. Lannie Collection, 1733-1974

Vincent P. Lannie Collection, 1733-1974

The Vincent P. Lannie Collection consists of five separate manuscripts by plantation owner Elizabeth Allston Pringle: (1) Partial draft of a chapter ("Baby Woes") from "Chronicles of Chicora Wood." (2) A story entitled "The Innocents at Home and the Furniture Fiend Abroad" written under her pen name, Patience Pennington, and intended to be the first in a series of "Peaceville Happenings." (3) A story entitled "My Dogs" for a projected series of "Plantation Sketches." (4) An incomplete rough draft of an untitled short story about Pompey Green and his disobedient wife Doll. (5) Miscellaneous notes on owners of plantations on the Pee Dee, Waccamaw and Black Rivers, with the fullest notes on White House Plantation.

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Small-Whaley Family Papers, 1796-1994

Small-Whaley Family Papers, 1796-1994

The Diary of a Voyage to China, 1850-1851, the private diary of Captain Thomas Small, reveals the intense loneliness of command and details the longing he feels for the wife and newborn son he left behind. He comments on marriage, child-rearing, and religion, and frequently expresses his desire to find employment "ashore" to better provide for his family. In addition to these personal entries, he provides rich details of a mid-nineteenth century life at sea. Daily nautical annotations are augmented with comments about the crew, rations, frequent communications with passing ships, and his waning hope in obtaining a profitable cargo of tea in China.

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Charles Fraser Book of Precedents, 1800-1819

Charles Fraser Book of Precedents, 1800-1819

Charles Fraser's Book of Precedents, 1800-1819, was apparently handwritten by Charleston miniaturist Fraser as a reference work for his legal studies. Compiled mostly from 1800 -1807, the book contains copies of writs, pleas and judgments and includes cases adjudicated from 1736-1819, almost all of which were heard in Charleston district courts.

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Thomas J. Tobias Papers, ca. 1790-1970

Thomas J. Tobias Papers, ca. 1790-1970

The Thomas J. Tobias Papers contain six diaries written by three members of the same family, in the mid-19th century. The Joseph Lyons diary (1833-1834), written when he was between the ages of 19-21, contains Lyons' ruminations on his future career, his beliefs on state's rights, some poetry, and his thoughts on his Jewish faith. Joseph Lyons' nephew, David Henry Mordecai, wrote in four diaries between 1849 and 1858, detailing his travels to Cuba and the Florida Keys, in addition to extensive travels through Europe, and his treatment for tuberculosis. After David Henry Mordecai's death from tuberculosis in 1859, his sister Hortensia journalized her travels in Europe with her family and her diary records her thoughts on art and other sightseeing in Italy, Germany, and France.

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Septima P. Clark Papers, ca. 1910-ca. 1990

Septima P. Clark's 1964 black and white passport photo.

This collection contains material relating to the life and work of Septima P. Clark. The biographical papers include tributes, clippings, certificates, awards, family correspondence and transcripts of various oral history interviews in which Clark discusses her parents; husband; growing up and race relations in Charleston, South Carolina; her work in Citizenship Schools; her work at the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, and in the civil rights movement with people like Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Rosa Parks, Stokely Carmichael, Dorothy Cotton, Ella Baker, Jesse Jackson, Andrew Young, Hosea Williams, Ralph David Abernathy and others. There are a few references to the Charleston South Carolina Hospital Worker's strike in 1969. A series on her works includes a photocopy of her autobiography Echo in My Soul, with related papers; various versions of talks and essays on civil rights, race and racism, non-violence, God and religion, American youth, tributes to individuals and other topics.

Her correspondence includes numerous local and state black and white politicians; a partial letter to Ella Gerber regarding Porgy and Bess, a significant series of letters with writer Josephine Carson (Rider), and from Spelman College professor Vincent Harding, with some of his articles. Presidential materials include a photocopy of a Jimmy Carter letter; a letter from Gerald Ford; and an invitation to inauguration of Richard Nixon and Spiro Agnew.

A series documenting her affiliations begins with a her association with Charleston schools, and contains correspondence regarding losing of her job in 1956 as a teacher for being a member of the NAACP; her service (1975-1978) on the Charleston County School Board; and other connections with various educational endeavors. The series also includes papers regarding her association with the Highlander Folk Center; papers regarding her work with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, with material on Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.; papers regarding the Penn Community Center and Clark's relationship with it; publications, program materials and correspondence regarding Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority and local Charleston Chapter, Gamma Xi Omega; materials regarding various women's groups with which she was affiliated; materials regarding various civil rights, African American and political groups and causes for which she worked; a list of grievances regarding the Charleston Hospital Worker's strike, brochures from various African American political campaigns, groups to free jailed African Americans; the US Commission on Civil Rights, State Advisory Committee of SC; Neighborhood Legal Assistance and other similar groups.

Her church papers include materials regarding Old Bethel Methodist Church, Charleston, SC, and other various Methodist groups, and her papers documenting her relationship with arts groups contain a nearly complete script of Sea Island Song by Alice Childress. Other materials documenting Clark's association with social, health care and literary-related agencies include papers regarding the Septima Clark Day Care Center, and papers dealing with the handicapped. Her relationships with various schools cover institutions such as College Seven, University of California-Santa Cruz, Benedict College and Hampton University, including student papers submitted at Hampton regarding Saxon Elementary School, Columbia, SC, and materials documenting unrest at Allen University, Columbia, SC, and at Voorhees College, Denmark, SC. Photographs show Septima Clark, Poinsette and Clark family members, various functions, programs and events participated in by Clark and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, including teaching programs at various spots and the Charleston Hospital Workers' strike.

This collection was digitized and made freely accessible online through the generous support of the National Historical Publications & Records Commission

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Frank Fisher Notes, 1882-1902

Color print of page 1 of Frank Fisher's Notes, 1882-1902.

Frank R. Fisher's notes contain observations, drawings, and photographs relating to scientific studies, particularly astronomical observations made while Fisher was a resident in Charleston, S.C., during the 1880s. Fisher, a cashier at the South Carolina Railroad Company in Charleston, was an amateur scientist and inventor who occasionally worked in consultation with longtime College of Charleston professor Lewis R. Gibbes. Frank Fisher's notes also contain a lengthy analysis of the 1886 Charleston earthquake.

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